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County of San Bernardino

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Virulent Newcastle Disease Update: Quarantine Boundaries Modified in Southern California

California State Veterinarian Dr. Annette Jones today modified Southern California’s quarantine area to further restrict bird movement as work continues to eradicate virulent Newcastle disease (VND). The quarantine mandates the reporting of sick birds and prohibits poultry owners from moving birds in all of Los Angeles County, and in large areas of San Bernardino and Riverside counties.

The modified quarantine extends from the northern and southern borders of western Riverside County to the Salton Sea—including the Coachella Valley—and as far east as Yucca Valley in San Bernardino County, with a northern boundary of State Route 58 at the Kern County line. The quarantine language and a map may be found at CDFA’s VND Web site.

The quarantine requires bird owners to allow diagnostic testing, to isolate poultry from other species, to cease exhibitions, to stop the shipping and receiving of birds, and to enhance biosecurity.

“By modifying the quarantine area in Southern California, we are building upon an ongoing effort to eradicate virulent Newcastle disease,” said Dr. Jones. “The primary way that VND spreads is by people moving sick birds. Extending the prohibition of bird movement across a larger area is the next logical step in being able to stop the spread of the virus and to eradicate the disease.”

VND is a nearly-always fatal respiratory infection in poultry. Birds may seem healthy but will die within days of being infected. There is no cure. The virus is also transmitted by people who have VND on their clothes or shoes, and by equipment or vehicles that can transport the disease from place to place.

There are no human health concerns provided that any meat or eggs are cooked properly. People who come in direct contact with the virus may develop conjunctivitis-like symptoms or run a mild fever.

The only way to stop the virus and eradicate the disease is to euthanize birds. This includes all infected birds as well as birds within heavily-infected areas.

Since May 2018, staff from the California Department of Agriculture (CDFA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) have been working in joint incident command to eradicate VND in Southern California. The highly contagious virus has resulted, or will soon result, in the euthanasia of more than one million birds in Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino, and Ventura counties.

Birds from four poultry industry producers in Riverside County and two poultry industry producer in San Bernardino County have also been infected with VND and all birds in those facilities have been or will be euthanized.

For more information about movement restrictions, biosecurity, and testing requirements, please call the Sick Bird Hotline (866) 922-2473 or email SFSPermits@cdfa.ca.gov.

Leading housing policy authority featured at Dome Talks

Rothstein’s book The Color of Law documents the drivers of residential segregation in America

Richard Rothstein, author of The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How our Government Segregated America, is the featured Dome Talks speaker on Thursday, Feb. 28 at the San Bernardino County Museum.

Rothstein, a former New York Times columnist, is a research associate at the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and Haas Institute at the University of California–Berkeley. The Color of Law expands upon and provides a national perspective on his recent work that documents the history of state-sponsored residential segregation, as in his report, “The Making of Ferguson.”

The book examines the common misperception that divisions in communities were primarily the result of individual prejudices, income differences, or the actions of private institutions like banks and real estate agencies. Starting in the 1920s, during a time when millions of African Americans moved in a great historical migration from the south to the north, The Color of Law investigates and exposes the laws and policy decisions — some now forgotten or rescinded — passed by local, state, and federal governments that actually promoted discriminatory patterns that continue to this day.

Museum Director Melissa Russo remarked “the topic of segregation, and how we got there, is a significant historical topic for our region, and a timely one as policies around housing continue to evolve today. By hosting a speaker like Richard Rothstein, the museum can play a unique role in helping to interpret and define this history and how it applies to the Inland Empire, in order to engender conversations and policies that help shape future decisions.”

All Dome Talks evenings open at 6:30 p.m. for a light reception sponsored by the San Bernardino County Museum Association. Rothstein’s talk starts at 7 p.m. and will include sales of his book and signing.

Tickets for the evening are $25 ($18 museum members), subject to availability as the Dome Talks theater has limited seating. Tickets can be purchased online at www.sbcounty.gov/museum or may be purchased at the Museum’s Guest Services Desk.

The San Bernardino County Museum’s exhibits of regional, cultural and natural history and the Museum’s other exciting events and programs reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. Parking for Dome Talks is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Regional Parks now hiring lifeguards and pool managers for summer swim season

From Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day weekend the San Bernardino County Regional Parks opens its swim complexes for families to enjoy. We would like to invite any interested candidates to apply as a Lifeguard or Pool Manager at one of our Regional Parks for the 2019 Summer Season.

The department will be hosting a one-day hiring event on March 2, 2019 where potential same day job offers could be made. If you are unable to attend the event, applications will be accepted online continuously through April.

Regional Parks will be offering lifeguard certification training in March. Candidates who are selected at the hiring event, will be able to obtain certifications paid for by the department.

All applicants are required to have C.P.R. and First Aid certifications, prior to the first day of employment.  Lifeguards will be required to show proof of current Lifeguard Certifications, valid through September 2019. All requirements must be met before the first day of work. Bilingual abilities strongly desired.

The following positions are available for the 2019 Summer Swim Season:

Pool Manager – $ 17.00 hourly (2 at each site)

·         21 years of age or older

·         5 Years of Lifeguard Experience

·         1-2 Years of Supervisory Experience

Senior Lifeguard – $ 14.00 hourly (2 at each site)

  • 18 years of age or older
  • 3 Years of Lifeguard Experience
Returning Lifeguard – $ 13.00 hourly

  • 16 years of age or older
  • 1 or more years Lifeguard Experience with Regional Parks
New Lifeguard – $ 12.50 hourly

·         16 Years of age or older

 

Preferred work location is not guaranteed and will be decided by Park staffing needs.

Please visit www.sbcounty.gov/jobs and apply today!

“Images of Black Culture, Life, & History” at County Museum

Kenneth Gatewood

Twenty-one African American artists featured in show recognizing Black History Month

The San Bernardino County Museum, in partnership with the Southern California Black Chamber of Commerce, Inland Cities, East, presents an exhibit featuring the fine art works of prominent African American artists from throughout Southern California to recognize Black History Month. “Images of Black Culture, Life, & History” opens at the Museum on Feb. 1 and continues through Mar 3.  The Chamber hosts an exhibit reception at the Museum on Thursday, Feb. 7 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Keith Mikell

Guest curated by Charles Bibbs, who also has two works in the show, the artists participating include  Adeola Davies-Ayeloja, Alva, Bernard Hoyes, Christopher J. Wesley, Derrick Dzine, Diana Shannon Young, Emmy Lu, Errol Cook, Keith Mikell, Kenneth Gatewood, Manuelita Brown, Michael Massenburg, Maurice Howard, Nathaniel Bustion, Rosalind McGary, Synthia Saint James, Shaz Taylor, Theresa Shellcroft, Viveca Mays, and Zeal Harris. The show includes paintings, watercolors, collages, ceramics, and quilts.

Curator of visitor engagement and exhibits, David Myers said, “these images are reflective of an array of experiences expressing power, beauty, provocation, hopelessness and hope. Charles Bibbs, with his immense talent and profile in the arts, brought together both established and emerging artists to weave a complex story of the African American experience. We are truly grateful to Charles and the Southern California Black Chamber of Commerce for helping us ensure that our exhibits are representative and reflective of our community both during our Black History Month celebration and all year long.”

The San Bernardino County Museum’s exhibits of regional cultural and natural history and the Museum’s other exciting events and programs reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). EBT card holders and families are admitted for $1. Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. This special exhibit is included with museum general admission. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Black History Art Exhibit at the County Museum

In honor of Black History Month, the Southern California Black Chamber of Commerce, Inland Cities East will be hosting its annual Black Art Exhibit at the San Bernardino County Museum.

This year local renowned artist Charles Bibbs is the curator for the 2019 Black Art Exhibit, which is themed “Images of Black Life, Culture and History.”

The exhibit will run from Friday, Feb. 1 until Sunday, March 3.

A reception will also he held on Thursday, Feb. 7 from 5 to 8 p.m. which will include the artists, local dignitaries along with business and community leaders.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane in Redlands.

Read this flyer for more information on the event.

Code Enforcement increases focus on illegal trucking in Bloomington

San Bernardino County Code Enforcement officers will increase enforcement of illegal trucking operations in the unincorporated area of Bloomington to mitigate environmental hazards and public nuisances in residential areas.

There are more than 100 properties in Bloomington where the number of illegal operations involving truck storage, warehousing hazardous materials on properties, and unpermitted businesses is significantly higher than any other unincorporated area of the County.

“Bloomington is in the midst of designing its future as part of the new Countywide Plan and any illegal operations that currently exist there are not part of the vision,” said Fifth District Supervisor Josie Gonzales whose district includes Bloomington. “The community definitely needs healthy businesses to thrive; businesses choosing to be good actors that comply with local, regional, state, and federal regulations enacted to protect all of our residents. County Code Enforcement will play a key role in ensuring Bloomington’s bright economic future.”

The Board of Supervisors allocated $400,000 in the 2018-19 County budget to address unpermitted truck operations in Bloomington which will allow a Code Enforcement officer to work on the issue full time.

In residential zones of Bloomington, only one tractor-trailer is allowed to be parked as long as the truck and trailer belongs to the owner-operator and is parked in an appropriate area on at least one acre of land.

Evelyn Duke, a longtime resident of Bloomington, lives across the street from a property where trucks were parked illegally before the operation was shut down. She complained about noise and plumes of smoke the trucks would give off when driving onto the property because she saw how it was negatively impacting her elderly neighbors.

“They had eight or nine trucks parked there and we couldn’t open our doors or windows because of the noise and they would leave their trucks idling out there at night,” Duke said. “One of the things that made me most angry was the sound of them changing tires at 10 o’clock at night.”

Code Enforcement currently has several open cases on suspected illegal trucking operations where as many as 20 tractor-trailers are located on one property in a residential zone. A significant number are next to schools. Illegal trucking operations negatively impact air and groundwater quality and increase odor, exposure to hazardous materials and the unsafe operation of trucks on neighborhood streets.

About 2,400 students attend Bloomington High School on Laurel Avenue, a street that has one lane of traffic going each way and several illegal trucking operations in the immediate area. Often right in front of the school, trucks on the narrow street must sit and wait for the oncoming lane to clear of traffic before they can make the left turn from Laurel. This is particularly a problem at crowded school arrival and dismissal times, according to Principal Sandy Torres.

“It does create traffic jams,” Torres said. “It makes it more hectic for our parents when they try to drop off and pick up their kids.”

The increased code enforcement operation has already led to criminal charges being filed against illegal operators who didn’t comply with County codes and other regulations.

A majority of the illegal operations are in areas zoned for single-family residences and must be relocated. A small number of the illegal operations could come into compliance if the owners who are in an appropriate zone applied for a permit to operate or applied for a zone change with Land Use Services.

The County is providing assistance for illegal trucking operators who want to come into compliance and/or relocate their business with the help of a commercial broker. For relocation resources, contact Matthew Mena at the Economic Development Agency at (909) 387-4552. People who need assistance with land use and zoning may contact Ignacio Nunez at Code Enforcement at (909) 948-5086.

Human Trafficking Awareness Walk on Saturday in San Bernardino

The San Bernardino County Coalition Against Sexual Exploitation (CASE) will draw attention to the crime of commercial sexual exploitation and trafficking one step at a time.

The coalition will host its 2019 Human Trafficking Awareness Walk on Jan. 26 in San Bernardino.

Registration for the annual event, now in its ninth year, will begin at 8 a.m. at the Children’s Network office at 825 E. Hospitality Lane in San Bernardino.

There will be speakers at the event at 9 a.m.

Walkers will leave the Children’s Network office at 10 a.m. and head east towards Tippecanoe and back around to the starting point.

Participants can preregister for the free event at https://tinyurl.com/ybds65p9

“Human trafficking and sexual exploitation of children are often thought of as only occurring in foreign countries, but it happens here and we’re all responsible for educating ourselves and others about the realities of trafficking in our own neighborhoods and communities,” said CASE Coordinator, Anne-Michelle Ellis. “Commercial sexual exploitation affects children in all parts of our county– all children are vulnerable.”

The San Bernardino County Coalition Against Sexual Exploitation formed in 2009 to address commercial sexual exploitation of children in the county. It’s a collaborative effort among child-serving county departments, service agencies and community members.

Quarterly CASE outreach & education meetings are the second Tuesday of the month. For locations or more information, contact CASE Coordinator Angel Magallanes at (909) 383-9677 or email her at angel.magallanes@hss.sbcounty.gov.

“We look forward to the community coming together and joining us in creating awareness of this important issue that impacts our community,” said Magallanes. “With each step of the walk, we take a step toward ending human trafficking and modern day slavery.”

The San Bernardino County Coalition Against Sexual Exploitation is helping the community achieve the Countywide Vision by promoting the protection of children and promoting public safety and health. Information on the Countywide Vision can be found at www.sbcounty.gov/vision.

Board of Supervisors endorses Vision2Succeed Initiative

The Board of Supervisors today endorsed Vision2Succeed, a new campaign designed to strengthen the career skills of our local workforce by connecting county residents to opportunities that enhance their qualifications to support existing employers and attract new employers to San Bernardino County.

“A skilled workforce encourages a vibrant economy, and that is why we support Vision2Succeed,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Robert Lovingood. “I encourage our community to get involved in learning experiences and programs that help to propel career growth and lifelong learning. Across the county we have a strong system of schools, colleges and universities as well as training and job resource centers that benefit residents and employers alike.”

A dynamic economy benefits all San Bernardino County residents. The Vision2Succeed.org website is a resource, providing residents with information about career exploration ideas, programs and events focused on workforce and skills development, as well as sharing opportunities to explore and participate in career options such as mentorships, internships and apprenticeships.

“Mentoring programs are a promising approach to enriching the lives of young people, addressing their need for positive adult role models, and providing one-on-one support and advocacy. Through a mentoring relationship, adult volunteers and participating youth make a significant commitment of time and energy to develop relationships devoted to personal, academic, and career development,” said Kathy Turnbull, Network Officer for Children’s Network.

The Board of Supervisors is asking all San Bernardino County residents and businesses to get involved in the launch of Vision2Succeed by posting career-building information on social media. For example, information or personal experiences about becoming a mentor, expanding a business, pursuing a new career or even changing careers. The board is also asking everyone to use the hashtags #Vision2Succeed and #myfirstjob on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram.

As one of the fastest growing population and employment centers in the nation, San Bernardino County is uniquely positioned to help its residents receive the skills they need to prosper in the 21st century economy. According to research conducted for the San Bernardino County Workforce Development Board, the county’s economy is supported by a strong mix of businesses poised to expand over the next decade, with employment expected to grow by 73,097 jobs during that period. This continues a trend of San Bernardino County and the Inland Empire outpacing California and the nation in employment since the first quarter of 2013. In addition, the county has a relatively young population, foundational to bolstering the region’s long term prospects for economic growth.

Fully maximizing that potential requires an ecosystem in which stakeholders work side by side to develop and train a workforce prepared for career opportunities, particularly in high-growth industries. The Countywide Vision project will highlight school districts, colleges and employers, who have implemented comprehensive strategies to meet the employment needs of local business and encouraged development of career pathways for youth.

On Jan.17, the County will release its labor market intelligence report as part of its Workforce Roadmap presentation to the community. This presentation, a Vision2Succeed kickoff event, will help identify the county’s greatest areas of opportunity for job creation and workforce development, prioritize training investment, and support workforce development systems, ensuring our county remains a leading job creator for California.

In June 2011 the Board of Supervisors and the San Bernardino Council of Governments adopted the Countywide Vision in partnership with the community.  The Countywide Vision provides a roadmap for the future of San Bernardino County, including the creation of a healthy and prosperous future for all who live, work and play here. Vision2Succeed is the fourth public campaign of the Countywide Vision Project following the successful Vision4Safety initiative, the Vision2BActive physical activity initiative and the Vision2Read literacy initiative.

A Message from Board Chairman Robert A. Lovingood

Sunday marks the third anniversary of the December 2, 2015 attack in San Bernardino. On that horrific day, 14 people including 13 members of our County family were taken from us in an evil act of terror.

We will always remember the people we loved and cherished and we will continue to support those who are still healing from physical and emotional wounds.

The County Environmental Health Services family and the Board of Supervisors are asking all County employees, their families, and the public to join us wherever you may be for a moment of remembrance at 10:55 a.m. on Sunday, December 2.

At that time, the County will pay tribute to those who were taken from us and the survivors on our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts. We have also arranged to have full-page memorial messages printed in the Sun, Daily Bulletin, Daily Facts and Daily Press newspapers and on their websites on Sunday.

If you fly an American flag at home, we ask that you lower your flag to half-staff on Sunday in honor of those who were taken from us on that tragic day three years ago. We have asked the same of everyone in our county community.

If you are experiencing trauma due to the events of December 2, 2015, resources are available to help you. Please click here for more information.

Please continue to support those who are still hurting and healing and continue to look out for each other.

Sincerely,

Robert A. Lovingood
Chairman of the Board of Supervisors

Sheriff’s Marine Enforcement Unit heroes to be featured Sunday on NBC

Sunday night, after the Sunday Night NFL Game on NBC Channel 4, Corporal Travis Vessells, Deputy Brian Weck, and Deputy William “Billy” Poe of the Colorado River Station’s – Marine Enforcement Unit will be recognized as the “Roggin’s Hero: Heroes of the Night” on Fred Roggin’s show, “The Challenge.”

NBC chose these three individuals from our Sheriff’s Department for their continued efforts in seeking out individuals operating a vessel while under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs.

Our Marine Enforcement Unit annually leads the state in arresting impaired boating operators.

Take time to watch and support them for having a Vision4Safety for San Bernardino County.

 

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