Translate:
HomeCo
Home
Countywide Vision
Services A-Z
Services
Visiting
Living
Working
Contacts
Email Subscriptions
E-Subscriptions
Envelope GovDelivery NoticesGet e-mail updates when this information changes.

Administrator

1 2 3 13

Trona Earthquake Recovery

The County will post daily updates and information here. Residents of Trona and other San Bernardino County communities impacted by the July 4 and 5 earthquakes can have questions answered by calling toll-free 1(877) 410-8829

Thursday, July 18, 2019

  • Construction debris bins are available starting Monday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Trona Transfer Station, 13177 Trona Dump Road. Click here for details and guidelines.
  • A Household Hazardous Waste Collection Event will be held Saturday, August 10 and Saturday, Sept. 28 from 8 a.m. to noon at the San Bernardino County Fire Station, 83732 Trona Rd. in Trona. Click here for details.

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

  • Effective Friday, the Local Assistance Center will be closed at Trona High School. A Recovery Center will open at 13207 Jones St. in Trona. Click here for more information.
  • The boil water notice has officially been lifted for the Trona area. It is no longer necessary to boil tap water or to consume bottled water.
  • The Trona Library (cooling center) will be resuming normal operating hours on Thursday, July 18.  Normal operating hours are: Monday – Friday: 11 a.m. – 7 p.m., Thursday: 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., Friday: closed, Saturday: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Sunday: closed
  • The new phone numbers for customers to contact the Searles Domestic Water Company are: 760-382-3776 760-382-8553. No past due fees for the water bills will be assessed this month due to the earthquakes in Trona and surrounding communities.

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

  • The Trona Transfer Station will return to regular operating hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday.
    The dumpsters located at the Trona Library (82805 Mountain View, Trona, CA 93562) and Argus Area (across from Shell Station, 82275 Trona Road, Trona, CA 93562) will be remain available from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. until 7/19/19.
  • Trona residents in need of non-construction clean-up may call Team Rubicon (volunteer organization) to request assistance.
    Please call 310-640-8787 and follow the prompt or email r9info@teamrubiconusa.org. Team Rubicon unites the skills and experiences of military veterans with first responders to rapidly provide relief to communities in need. For more information on Team Rubicon visit http://teamrubiconusa.org
  • Monday, July 15, 2019
  • An update on building inspections in Trona and surrounding San Bernardino County communities.
  • All initial inspections of earthquake damaged structures in Trona and nearby San Bernardino County communities have been completed by damage assessment teams led by the County Fire Marshal, including building inspectors from Land Use Services.  Structures that were not tagged as Yellow or Red, can be assumed to be Green-tagged, with no major damage noted. However, residents are encouraged to call Land Use Services at 760-995-8140 or 909-387-8311 to request a follow-up inspection if they have particular safety concerns, or to re-evaluate the tag status, considering repairs (such as a gas line or other utility repair).
  • Remember: A yellow tag means the occupant may enter briefly to retrieve essential items. A red tag means the building is not safe to enter.
  • If you have a yellow or red tag, call for an inspection appointment to discuss the damage assessment and next steps.
  • Veterans Town Hall
  • A Veterans Town Hall will be held Wednesday, July 17 at the Elks Lodge in Trona. For more information, click here.
  • Sunday, July 14, 2019
  • Trona Earthquakes Rattle, Displace Residents, Many Buildings Deemed Unsafe to Return
  • San Bernardino County Fire Damage Assessment Team, with the assistance of County Building & Safety, and Code Enforcement, and CalOES, has completed its damage assessment of the communities of Trona, Argus, Red Mountain, and Windy Acres following the devastating earthquakes that shook the area on July 4th and 5th.
  • All building inspections have been assessed and completed. A full report is expected to be released within the week and will be sent to state and federal officials for review. FEMA will ultimately determine if the earthquake damage meets the Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act criteria/threshold for assistance, such as low interest loans.
  • If your property has sustained some damage but has not been tagged by County Fire, it is safe to return. Damage reports are used for FEMA and insurance purposes only. The following properties have been determined to be unsafe or unlivable:
  • Residential
  • Red-Tagged: 31
  • Yellow-Tagged: 51
  • Commercial
  • Red-Tagged: 8
  • Yellow-Tagged: 4
  • Underground Storage Fuel Tanks Red-Tagged: 4
  • Tag Definition
  • Red-Tagged – not habitable in current conditions, structure has been severely damaged to the degree that that it is too dangerous to inhabit.
  • Yellow-Tagged – moderately damaged to the degree that its habitability is limited, not suitable for overnight stays, limited occupancy.
  • If you feel your home has become unsafe, you can visit our Local Assistance Center (LAC) at Trona High School daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. or call 877-410-8829 between 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. and safety officials will respond and inspect the structure.  Final day for inspections is Tuesday, July 16.
  • Friday, July 12, 2019
  • At 6:11 a.m., there was a swarm of aftershocks including 4.9 and 3.1 magnitude earthquakes registering 8 kilometers east northeast of Ridgecrest. Damage is still being evaluated.
  • Roundtrip service to the American Red Cross shelter in Ridgecrest has been expanded through Monday. At 9 a.m and 12:30 p.m, the shuttle will depart from the Ridgecrest Red Cross Shelter to Trona High School. At 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. the shuttle will leave Trona High School to the Ridgecrest Red Cross Shelter.
  • The Trona transfer station, 13177 Trona Dump Rd, Searles Valley, will be open to accept household waste from 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday to Saturday. The Transfer Station will also be open this Sunday, July 14, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Trona Library, 82805 Mountain View Street in Trona is also accepting household trash from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Starting Monday, July 15, household trash will be accepted at the Argus Fire Station, 82275 Trona Road from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Thursday, July 11, 2019
  • All water has been restored to Trona. Report water leaks to 760-372-2291. Boil water order still in effect until further notice. For information on what to do during a boil water order, click here.
  • Wednesday, July 10, 2019
  • At 1:09 p.m. a 4.2 magnitude earthquake was registered near Trona. No reports of additional damage or injuries reported at this time.
  • Residents of Trona and other San Bernardino County communities impacted by the July 4 and 5 earthquakes can have questions answered by calling toll-free 1(877) 410-8829
  • 2ND COOLING CENTER OPENS: First Baptist Church of Searles Valley, 84661 Trona Rd., 93562 is open to residents from 8a.m. to 7:30p.m.
  • ROAD CLOSURES: until further notice: Austin St. between Main St. and Jones St. (or Market St.)
    Searles St. between Main St. and Jones St. (or Market St.)
  • Tuesday, July 9, 2019:
  • On Wednesday, July 10, San Bernardino County will open a Local Assistance Center (LAC) at Trona High School located at 83600 Trona Rd. from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The LAC is a one-stop location to access supportive services for residents affected by the earthquakes. Resources are provided free of charge. The following agencies are scheduled to provide resources and/or services at the LAC:
  • County Departments: Assessor/Recorder/Clerk, Aging and Adult Services, Behavioral Health, Public Health, Veterans Affairs, Land Use Services, Preschool Services, Transitional Assistance Department, Water and Sanitation,Workforce Development Department. Others include: Faith Based Organizations, Insurance agencies, Southern California Edison. The LAC will be open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. until further notice. For up to date information, visit this Trona Earthquake Recovery page.
  • Residents of the Trona and Windy Acres areas and the news media are invited to attend a town hall meeting at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, July 10, at Trona High School, 83600 Trona Road, Trona. Elected officials and service experts from San Bernardino County, federal and state governments, and local utility providers will discuss the status of response and recovery efforts related to the July 4 and 5 earthquake swarm. Participants will include the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department, the County Fire Protection District, County Public Health, County Public Works, and other San Bernardino County agencies. In attendance will be State Senator Shannon Grove, County Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman, First District County Supervisor Robert Lovingood, San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon and State Assemblyman Jay Obernolte. The various speakers will address the status of recovery efforts specific to the San Bernardino County communities affected by the earthquakes and services to residents. Residents will have an opportunity to speak and ask questions publicly and privately following the meeting. Participants will also be available to the news media.
  • President Donald Trump declared an emergency for California to allow federal agencies to administer aid to those affected by the earthquakes. The declaration authorizes the Federal Emergency Management Agency to provide disaster relief in San Bernardino and Kern counties.
  • Monday, July 8, 2019:
  • Trona County Library will open as a COOLING CENTER from 10 am. to 6 p.m. Tuesday (tomorrow) to Thursday, July 18. A portable restroom will also be available outside the Library, 82805 Mountain View Street.
  • Portable showers will be available starting at 10 a.m. Tuesday (tomorrow) at Trona High School, 83600 Trona Road. Medical services will also be available at the high school starting Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Trona Post Office is closed until further notice. All residents are directed to go to the Ridgecrest Post Office to conduct all postal needs including picking up and dropping off mail – 101 E. Coso Ave, 93555. Main phone for the Postal Service is 1-800-275-8777.
  • All natural gas has been restored to the Trona area. For residents needing gas restoration, call 1-800-PGE-5000 (1-800-743-5000). People are advised to mention that they are calling for earthquake restoration services.
  • Shuttles are now available for Trona residents to the Kerr McGee Center in Ridgecrest where the American Red Cross has set up a shelter. A once-a-day shuttle will depart at 10 a.m. from Trona High School, 83600 Trona Rd. and return from the American Red Cross Shelter in Ridgecrest at noon. Water continues to be available at Trona High School.
  • Trona residents: To report damage or specific needs please contact the San Bernardino County Emergency Operations Center at 909-356-3998 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.
  • Mental health services continue to be provided through Friday at Trona High School, 83600 Trona Road.
  • Saturday, July 6, 2019:
  • Early Saturday morning, San Bernardino County signed a declaration of local emergency to assist the San Bernardino County communities affected by two days of earthquakes.
  • Under the coordination of the County Office of Emergency Services, County officials and departments have been working around the clock to assess the situation in Trona and provide vital services to residents.
  • There are numerous injuries and damaged residences in Trona. The County is working to determine the number of injured and damaged homes. County public works crews continue to assess and repair the road damage and per SCE, power has been restored.
  • Friday, July 5, 2019:
  • The State Water Resources Control Board Division of Drinking Water, the San Bernardino County Health Department, and the Searles Domestic Water Company are advising residents of Trona to only use boiled tap water or bottled water for drinking and cooking purposes.
    The affected area includes: Westend, South Trona, Argus, and Trona Village.
  • A comfort and care shelter has been opened at the Kerr McGee Community Center, 100 W. California Ave. in Ridgecrest.

County’s Big Bear Alpine Zoo at Moonridge wins Best of Big Bear honor

Readers of the Big Bear Grizzly have chosen the County’s Big Bear Alpine Zoo at Moonridge as the Big Bear Valley’s Best Natural/Cultural Attraction for 2019. What better reason to visit the zoo this weekend?

The Big Bear Alpine Zoo is a rehabilitation facility offering injured, orphaned and imprinted wild animals a safe haven, temporarily while they heal, or permanently, as they are unable to survive on their own. Current residents include very rare snow leopards, black bears, bald eagles, mountain lions, gray wolves, and many more.

The Big Bear Valley Recreation and Park District, a Special District of the County of San Bernardino owns the zoo, the facilities and the animals.

Find out more here.

 

A Message from Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman

Early Saturday morning, San Bernardino County signed a declaration of local emergency to assist the San Bernardino County communities affected by two days of earthquakes.

County Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman praised the efforts of first responders and other personnel in assisting the public after the July 4th/5th Earthquake Swarm.

“We appreciate the outreach and support from the Governor’s office and White House. FEMA has also provided resources to affected areas,” stated Hagman.

Under the coordination of the County Office of Emergency Services, County officials and departments have been working around the clock to assess the situation in Trona and provide vital services to residents.

“Rapid response within 30 minutes from our departments, Sheriff, County Fire, Office of Emergency, Caltrans, ICEMA, Public Health, Building & Safety, County Purchasing and the County Administrative Office ensured that our residents received our full support following this earthquake,” shared Chairman Hagman.

“We appreciate the efforts from everyone working on this incident and are doing all we can to assist those affected,” he continued.

There are numerous injuries and damaged residences in Trona. The County is working to determine the number of injured and damaged homes. County public works crews continue to assess and repair the road damage and per SCE, power has been restored.

It’s time for Children’s Fund’s Annual Backpack & School Supply Drive!

Now through July 12, Children’s Fund is collecting backpacks and school supplies for foster youth and other vulnerable children and teens in our communities. Let’s equip our children with the tools they need to be successful in school!

Visit Children’s Fund’s website to download a flyer or view a list of needed school supplies by grade. Questions? Call Children’s Fund at (909) 379-6035.

Thank you for your generosity!

Board approves balanced, visionary 2019-20 County budget

The Board of Supervisors on Tuesday unanimously adopted a balanced $6.9 billion budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

The budget fully funds increased costs to maintain current public service levels, makes a substantial contribution to capital project needs, and allocates funding to many projects and programs that support the Countywide Vision and the board’s goals and objectives.

“The Board’s longstanding fiscally prudent approach, coupled with continued growth in property and sales tax revenues, has placed the County in a position to take care of immediate needs and strategically invest in the future,” County Chief Executive Officer Gary McBride wrote to the Board.

Examples of funding recommendations include allocations to:

  • Enhance public safety, such as the Sheriff Department’s Hope and START programs),
  • Improve decision-making capabilities through the use of technology, such as Esri GIS licenses and support),
  • Address workload issues, particularly staffing for the District Attorney and Public Defender,
  • Invest in capital projects, such as gully funding the Valley Dispatch Center project.

The budget includes $406.9 million in reserves, $1 billion toward law and justice, $2.3 billion for human services, and $721 million for Arrowhead Regional Medical Center.

S&P Global upgrades County’s credit rating to AA+

Citing prudent budgeting practices by the county and an improving county economy, one of the nation’s top three credit rating agencies today upgraded San Bernardino County‘s credit rating from AA to AA+.

“This is a testament to the great work being done by our budget staff, our department managers and all County employees, who provide the public with a high level of service with efficiency and innovation,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman.

The County requested the credit review by S&P Global as part of a $335.2 million dollar refunding of outstanding debt approved by the Board of Supervisors last month. Based on current market conditions, the County expects the higher rating to help save over $30 million dollars on that refunding alone.

In its notification to the county, S&P Global cited a strengthening local economy as part of the reason for the upgrade, particularly employment growth, a rise in retail activity and rebounding real estate values.

It also praised the County for using “fiscal discipline” in the face of surging tax revenue from the improved economy.

“We view the county’s management as very strong, with strong financial policies and practices,” S&P wrote in its notification to the County. “We view the county’s budgetary flexibility as very strong. … Management reports that stronger tax revenue and continued actions to reduce expenditure growth contributed to a rebound in general fund performance in recent fiscal years.”

Among the specifics S&P Global cited were:

  • Strong budgetary performance, with operating surpluses at the general fund and the total governmental fund levels in fiscal 2018.
  • Very strong debt and contingent liability profile.
  • An analytically robust budget development process that uses trends and forecasts to build assumptions with input from local economists, and a budget document that includes details on assumptions to support decision-making by the Board of Supervisors.
  • Quarterly budget updates to the Board of Supervisors that include details on year-to-date revenue and expenditures.
  • Good debt disclosure online and in annual financial reports as well as a debt policy that is integrated with the strategic plan.

County Project Management employee wins statewide recognition for public service

A county government project manager has received statewide recognition for his exemplary public service.

Brenton Rankin

Brenton Rankin, a project manager with the county’s Real Estate Services Department Project Management Division, has received one of only three Excellence in Service awards given out each year by the California County General Services Association.

“Your demonstrated ability to manage logistically challenging and high-profile projects shows a high level of dedication and responsiveness to your customers’ needs,” the organization said in recognizing Brenton.

Brenton effectively manages a diverse roster of project types and brings a unique skill set to each, such as managing challenging projects within high-security detention facilities, upgrades at the Emergency Operations Center and new fueling stations, while managing and mitigating fiduciary risks and providing outstanding customer service.

One example of Brenton’s accomplishments is the Cafe and Conference Rooms Remodel Project, which converted a long-time restaurant into several multi-purpose conference rooms and a coffee bar within the County Government Center in San Bernardino. The project had the added challenge of having to serve as a temporary meeting place for the Board of Supervisors while the board’s chambers undergo renovation.

Brenton was tasked with keeping all construction efforts, audio/visual upgrades and furnishings on schedule to ensure the timely and seamless transition of the temporary board chambers functions into the temporary space to match the start of the chambers renovation project. Brenton worked closely with the county government leadership team to facilitate the scheduling and logistics of all public hearings, meetings and events.

Brenton is one of approximately 22,000 San Bernardino County government employees who define their job as creating “a county in which those who reside and invest can prosper and achieve well-being.”

 

Supervisors direct funding toward community efforts to end homelessness

An estimated 3,400 homeless individuals and families at imminent risk of homelessness will benefit from more than $6.6 million in state grant funding distributed today by the Board of Supervisors to 15 local agencies throughout the county.

Photo Credit: SCNG

An additional $2.3 million in grant funding will be distributed to seven additional local agencies in the near future.

The funds are a portion of nearly $9.4 million the county received from the $500 million Homeless Emergency Aid Program, or HEAP, block grant funding program created by the state last year.

The county will use more than $6.3 million to support homeless prevention and diversion programs, general homeless services, homeless outreach, reentry services, emergency shelter response, utility assistance, moving assistance, transportation services, document readiness, eviction services and housing search and stability. Almost $1.3 million will go toward rental subsidies. More than $1 million will be set aside specifically to assist homeless youth, and $213,000 will go toward shelter acquisition projects to serve the homeless.

Funds will be provided to the cities of Barstow, Colton, Montclair, Redlands, Rialto and Upland, the Morongo Unified School District, and community organizations based in San Bernardino, Victorville, Twentynine Palms, Apple Valley, Redlands, Hesperia, Fontana and elsewhere collectively serving homeless throughout the entire county.

Ending homelessness in San Bernardino County is a priority for the Board of Supervisors, who created the San Bernardino County Homeless Partnership in 2007. In July 2016, the board launched an initiative to assist homeless veterans and since then has successfully housed 1,096 veterans. Since January 2017, 191 chronically homeless people with mental health issues have been housed.

San Bernardino County’s innovative approaches to address homelessness – which have received accolades at the state and national levels – focus on collaboration, creation of available dwelling units, whole-person healthcare, jobs, and technology.

On April 16, the Board of Supervisors and Gov. Gavin Newsom held a roundtable discussion about the county’s efforts to fight homelessness and solutions to the problem moving forward. Newsom said he was so inspired by the “big ideas” at work in San Bernardino County that he will work with the state Legislature to set aside funding in the state’s upcoming 2019-2020 budget to enhance support for the county’s efforts.

County Fleet Management among the best on the continent – again!

For the 14th time in the past 15 years, San Bernardino County Fleet Management has been named one of the 100 Best Fleets in North America, coming in 17th place this year – up from 23rd last year.

The 100 Best Fleets competition recognizes fleet operations that perform at a high level using industry recognized processes and procedures, key performance indicators and best practices. The 100 Best Fleets results are announced every year at the National Association of Fleet Administrators Institute and Expo conference.

The approximately 100 men and women of San Bernardino County Fleet Management provide acquisition, maintenance, repair, modification, and disposal services for the majority of county vehicles and equipment. Fleet Management’s main garage in San Bernardino includes four shops: automotive, heavy duty, welding/metal fabrication, and generator services, as well as a parts room and fueling station. The department also operates five smaller service centers in Barstow, Victorville, Needles, Rancho Cucamonga and Twentynine Palms and 60 strategically located fueling sites.

Additionally, Fleet Management operates a motor pool, which has ownership and/or maintenance and replacement responsibility for approximately 1,940 vehicles and pieces of equipment assigned to or used by county departments.

County’s homelessness efforts impress new governor

From left, County CEO Gary McBride, Board of Supervisors Vice Chair Josie Gonzales, Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman and Gov. Gavin Newsom listen to presentations outlining the county’s efforts to combat homelessness.

San Bernardino County officials and their community partners impressed California’s new governor this week with the various strategies being employed to combat homelessness in America’s largest county.

Gov. Gavin Newsom said he was so inspired by the “big ideas” at work in San Bernardino County that he will work with the state Legislature to set aside funding in the state’s upcoming 2019-2020 budget to enhance support for the county’s efforts.

“This seems to me to be an extraordinary opportunity,” Gov. Newsom said. “I have the privilege of this moment to convince my legislative colleagues that this is a wise investment.”

“I am going back home re-energized,” he continued. “I want to look to redirect some of that money in a much more robust way. … That’s missing from my budget, but it doesn’t have to be on May 1. We can figure out ways to bolster that effort.”

San Bernardino County’s innovative approaches to address homelessness – which have received accolades at the state and national levels – focus on collaboration, creation of available dwelling units, whole-person healthcare, jobs, and technology. Efforts are coordinated by the county’s Interagency Council on Homelessness, which is chaired by Fifth District Supervisor Josie Gonzales and includes representatives from many cities within the county, and a variety of county departments, non-profit organizations, and other service providers.

During the meeting with Gov. Newsom on April 16, 2019, at Arrowhead Regional Medical Center McKee Family Health Center in San Bernardino, county and private sector partners outlined some of the county’s approaches toward ending homelessness, including:

  • Managed healthcare to ensure newly-housed people achieve and maintain physical and behavioral wellness to help prevent them from reverting to homelessness and relying on more costly emergency room care for their basic needs.
  • The conversion of hotels and motels to provide homes for the homeless. The Housing Authority of San Bernardino County and its private sector partners are in the process of converting motels in San Bernardino and Victorville into housing for homeless people. Tod Lipka, president and CEO of Step Up said there are 75 hotels and motels in the region that could be converted into housing if the state could provide funding for rent vouchers.

“There are wonderful things happening at the local level,” Gov. Newsom said. “We’ll have your back and we’ll be providing an unprecedented amount of resources, and we’re here for the long haul.”

1 2 3 13
Twitter @SBCountyFollow @SBCounty on Twitter!