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Public Works

Big Trucks & Engineering Focus of Museum Public Works Day

The San Bernardino County Museum hosts the popular annual Public Works Day on Saturday, June 2, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The day features a wide variety of hands-on activities related to engineering and science, in partnership with the San Bernardino County Department of Public Works.

Started by the American Public Works Association in 1960, National Public Works Week is a celebration of the tens of thousands of men and women in North America who provide and maintain the infrastructure and services collectively known as public works.

“’The theme for the 2018 National Public Works Week, ‘The Power of Public Works,’ gives voice to the impact the many facets of public works have on modern civilization,” said Kevin Blakeslee, director of County Public Works. “From providing clean water to disposing of solid waste, to building roads and bridges and removing snow on roadways, to the construction of dams, channels and levees to control flooding, or devising emergency management strategies to meet natural or manmade disasters, public works services play a significant role in a society’s quality of life. The Department of Public Works expresses its sincere thanks to the County Museum for hosting this event that will provide some fun, hands-on education to our residents as to how the Department of Public Works serves them.”

“Our Public Works Day continues to be a popular event,” said Museum Director Melissa Russo. “The big trucks and equipment are an obvious draw, and it’s a great opportunity for the public to learn what these regional projects involve, and how quality of life in our county is dependent on the thoughtfulness and quality of these infrastructure developments.”

Activities and demonstrations at the museum are especially designed to engage children and families with hands-on learning: create a glider, conduct experiments, explore with a storm drain robot, find yourself with the County Surveyor, learn to keep storm drains clean with Environmental Management, and recycle with Solid Waste Management, have your photo taken in a giant snow blower.

Hands-on learning activities related to science and technology and the County Museum’s other exciting events and exhibits reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). EBT cardholders are admitted for $1. Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. All activities are included with museum admission. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Lucerne Valley-Camp Rock Transfer Station available to Lucerne residents

The County of San Bernardino Department of Public Works Solid Waste Management Division is reminding residents of Lucerne about our Transfer Station in Lucerne for residential trash.

Lucerne Valley Camp Rock Transfer Station is at 27805 Squaw Bush Road in Lucerne Valley. Operational hours are Wednesday through Monday 8a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (Closed Tuesdays).  This disposal site is for county unincorporated residents only.  Each residential property owner in the unincorporated area is sent a Land Use punch card annually and this must be presented when using the facility.

Household hazardous materials cannot be brought to any San Bernardino County disposal site.  For information on Household Hazardous Waste, including disposal locations, please refer to 1-800-OILYCAT or http://www.sbcfire.org/ofm/hhw/HouseholdHazardousWaste.aspx.

For further information about Solid Waste Management please visit our website at;

http://cms.sbcounty.gov/dpw/SolidWasteManagement.aspx or call 909-386-8701.

Public Works to conduct road surface project in Lake Arrowhead

public works bannerThe County of San Bernardino Department of Public Works will be starting a surface seal project on various roads in the Lake Arrowhead area from June 20 through August 20. This work will be similar to the work done two years ago on Lake Gregory Drive.

Motorists can expect delays of five to 15 minutes because the project will be a moving operation with a pilot car, which will guide traffic through the work zone to allow access to businesses and homes. Flagmen will be stationed to allow one-way traffic..

The project will be a two-step process. The first step is application of a chip seal to provide a better wear surface. This approach is used on roadways two to three years after they have been resurfaced to protect the new resurface. The concept is similar to applying a wood sealer to a wooden deck to extend the life. The chip seal involves spreading oil onto the roadway to seal it and applying gravel chips that provide the wearing surface.

The second step consists of applying a “fog” seal over the newly chipped surface. This seal improves the bonding of the material to the roadway and improves appearance.

Chip seals are used because they are the most cost-effective treatment to preserve the roadway surface and to protect it from harmful oxidation from the sun and weather. The County typically applies a chip seal to roadways to protect the new surface by sealing it, providing a protective layer while rejuvenating dry and weathered asphalt pavement. Recently revised procedures in the chip seal process that include additional quality control measures, smaller chip size and the application of a fog seal coat have resulted in an improved product.

Public Works plays a key role in the achievement of the Countywide Vision, by maintaining the infrastructure of our roads.

Additional roads will be receiving a surface seal project. For more information see our website under Public Notices at http://cms.sbcounty.gov/dpw/Home.aspx. For further questions please contact the Department of Public Works Operations Division at (909) 387-8063.

County preparing for El Niño storms

Elder Creek at BaselineClearing flood control channels, stockpiling sandbags and holding public outreach meetings in flood-prone areas are just a few things County departments are doing to prepare for El Niño storms this fall and winter.

The Board of Supervisors heard a special presentation today from County staff about what is being done throughout the county to prepare for El Niño.

“The County is doing everything possible to be prepared for heavy rains,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman James Ramos. “Protecting the public is our highest priority. But we are urging the public to do everything they can to protect themselves, their families and their homes. Surviving El Niño will be a team effort.”

The County Office of Emergency Services is working in conjunction with the Department of Public Works, the Sheriff’s Department, County Fire, and Special Districts – along with local, regional and state partners – to make sure all safety issues throughout the county are being addressed. Risks of flooding and mudslides are higher in areas that have recently experienced wildfires.

Flood control channels and culvert crossings are being cleared in anticipation of heavy rains and advance teams are advising homeless encampments to relocate.  More than 200,000 sandbags are being stockpiled and inmate hand crews have been trained in sandbagging, flood fight techniques and debris removal.  Additional weather stations were added throughout the county and the real-time rain gauge alert system is being updated. Sheriff’s deputies and County firefighters are practicing procedures for swift water rescue training.

Public outreach meetings have been held in Lake Arrowhead, Yucaipa and Victorville to update residents on the latest El Niño forecast and what County departments are doing to prepare. Residents were also offered flood preparation materials. More public meetings will be held at 5:30 p.m. on Nov. 9 at the Yucca Valley Community Center, 57090 Twentynine Palms Highway in Yucca Valley and at 5:30 p.m. on Nov. 12 at the Victoria Gardens Cultural Center, 12505 Cultural Center Drive in Rancho Cucamonga. A meeting time and date for the San Antonio Heights/Mt. Baldy area will be announced soon.

An El Niño resources web page for residents to obtain information on storm preparation is available at http://www.sbcounty.gov/main/elnino.asp.

County portion of Santa Ana River Trail receives $3.4 million in funding

SANTA ANA RIVER TRAILThe California Coastal Conservancy Board on Thursday approved $3.4 million for construction of a portion of the Santa Ana River Trail in San Bernardino County.

Once completed, the Santa Ana River Trail will be about 100 miles long and will connect the Inland Empire from the crest of the San Bernardino Mountains to the Pacific Ocean near Huntington Beach. Once complete, it will be one of the longest urban recreation river parkways in the United States.

The $3.4 million will be used for the construction of Phase 3 of the trail from Waterman Avenue in San Bernardino to California Street in Redlands. This trail segment consists of a paved bikeway – a shared use path that is physically separated from any street or highway and may be used by pedestrians, skaters, wheelchair users, and other non-motorized users.

The funding is part of the Proposition 84 bond that allotted $45 million to the Santa Ana River Trail, giving each county $10 million towards their segment of the trail. The California Coastal Conservancy Board is the administrator of these grant funds.

Once accepted by the Board of Supervisors, the County can begin working on construction documents, permits and then construction of the next 3.8 miles of the trail. After completion of Phase 3, there will still be 11 miles of the trail to compete which could take approximately four more years.

To view a map of the Phase 3 segment, click here.

Portion of National Trails Highway reopens following floods

Public traveling on NTH againThe San Bernardino County Department of Public Works reopened National Trails Highway from Crucero Road to Amboy Road in Ludlow today at 2 p.m.
Severe thunderstorms blasted the Mojave Desert September 7 and 8 triggering flash floods throughout the desert regions. Closure of I-95, I-40, National Trails Highway (Route 66), Needles Highway, and various other desert roads occurred due to washouts and bridge damage.
The most extensive damage was along National Trails Highway where approximately 40 bridges were damaged along with major portions of the roadway.
Public Works crews have been working diligently to make these repairs. For the most up to date information on road closures we have a web page located here.

Forest Falls grateful for Public Works support

 

Dozens of Forest Falls residents took the time to thank County Public Works road crews in writing for cleaning up their community following a powerful storm that sent a river of mud and boulders through the heart of their mountain village.

Forest Falls letter

On Sunday, August 3, a thunderstorm parked itself just upstream of Forest Falls and dumped almost five inches of rain in less than an hour. A terrifying torrent of water, mud, boulders, and uprooted trees came roaring down into the community, closing Valley of the Falls Drive, Prospect Drive, and other roads, stranding many residents. The incident prompted an emergency proclamation by the Board of Supervisors.

20140804_092940Within a day, County Public Works had cleared roadways enough for residents to gain access to a shelter that had been established at the community center. Within two days, Valley of the Falls Drive and Prospect Drive were re-opened to the public. Unfortunately, Forest Falls is no stranger to these types of disasters.

The community’s unique canyon geography and the tendency of summer thunderstorms to stall upstream make sudden debris flows an all-to-common occurrence. Undeterred, residents have come to take these incidents in stride, and are grateful for the quick and consistent support they receive from numerous County agencies, including the Department of Public Works.

Public Works continues to improve National Trails Highway

#32 WORK IN PROGRESS.jpg 6 #32 WORK IN PROGRESS.jpg 7Publi#32 WORK IN PROGRESS.jpg 2c Works crews continue working hard to get National Trails Highway reopened after incurring damage from the September 2014 storms.

The storms in September damaged sections of National Trails Highway from Hector Road to Amboy. The most extensive damage was along National Trails Highway where approximately 40 bridges were damaged along with major portions of the roadway.  Sections between Hector Road to Crucero Road (Newberry Springs/Ludlow area), Crucero Road to Amboy Road, and Cadiz Road to Mountain Springs Road at Interstate 40 have been closed pending roadway repairs, shoulder repairs and bridge evaluations.

Public Works crews reopened the first stretch of the road, Hector Road to Crucero Road, in November. The photos above are on National Trails Highway, three miles east of Ludlow. The crews are anticipating opening this next section from Ludlow to Amboy sometime in January 2015.

Section of National Trails Highway to reopen

nationaltrailshighwayPublic Works is planning on reopening the section of National Trails Highway from Hector Road to Crucero Road, in the Newberry Springs/Ludlow area, by Friday, November 7.

Severe thunderstorms blasted the Mojave Desert September 7 and 8 triggering flash floods throughout the desert regions.  Closure of I-95, I-40, National Trails Highway (Route 66), Needles Highway, and various other desert roads occurred due to washouts and bridge damage.

The most extensive damage was along National Trails Highway where approximately 40 bridges were damaged along with major portions of the roadway.  Sections between Hector Road to Crucero Road (Newberry Springs/Ludlow, area), Crucero Road to Amboy Road, and Cadiz Road to Mountain Springs Road at I-40 have been closed pending roadway repairs, shoulder repairs and bridge evaluations.

Public Works crews have been working diligently to make these repairs.  This is the first stretch of the road to be reopened since the storms occurred.

It is anticipated the section of roadway between Crucero Road and Amboy Road will be open by the end of December 2014 and the section between Cadiz Road and Mountain Springs Road at I-40 by the end of January 2015.  All of these timeframes could vary depending on the weather.

For further questions please contact the Department of Public Works Operations Division at (909) 387-8063.

Severe storms damage roads and bridges in Mojave Desert

desertflooding1 desertflooding2Severe thunderstorm activity hit the Mojave Desert on Sunday, Sept. 7 and Monday, Sept. 8 triggering flash flood warnings throughout the region.

Because of washouts and bridge damage, Interstate 95, Interstate 40, National Trails Highway, Needles Highway, and various other desert roads were closed. The damaged roads and bridges are located in the communities of Helendale, Silver Lakes, Barstow, Newberry Springs, Ludlow, Amboy and Essex.

The Department of Public Works estimates $1.4 million in damage consisting of debris cleanup, shoulder washouts, bridge damage and roadway asphalt damage. The most extensive damage was along National Trials Highway where currently the sections between Fort Cady Road to Amboy Road, and Cadiz Road to Mountain Springs Road/Interstate 40 are closed pending roadway repairs and bridge evaluations.

 

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