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Your input needed: Morongo Basin Strategic Plan for Culture and the Arts

San Bernardino County has commissioned the creation of a Morongo Basin Strategic Plan for Culture and the Arts. This project represents an extraordinary opportunity for the communities in the Morongo Basin to advance their culture and arts, while strengthening the economic impact of these treasured resources.

The Cultural Planning Group, a Southern California consulting firm specializing in the field of arts and culture with experience working with communities across the country to create cultural plans, has been selected to guide the project under the County Land Use Services Department.

The goal of the Strategic Plan is to capitalize on existing resources to make the Morongo Basin’s culture and arts sector stronger, more accessible, and more sustainable. This plan will be implemented by community partners and intends to create connections to integrate culture and arts into other areas – including education, economic development, youth activities, human services, parks, and open spaces.

The County needs the entire community of local artists, leaders, businesses, and residents to provide input into what they would like to see in the plan.  The broader the perspective, the greater the support across all community sectors. The plan will assist Morongo Basin communities to articulate their vision for culture and the arts, leading to plans for activities that can fulfill that vision.

“The Morongo Basin is known for its artistic and creative way of life which continues to attract residents, businesses and tourists to this region,” said San Bernardino County Third District Supervisor James Ramos. “We hope the community will help us build this roadmap to continue to promote and celebrate the Morongo Basin as an artistic hub.”

Access to the Community Survey can be found via their online engagement website:

The Strategic Plan for Culture and the Arts is expected to be complete in mid-2018.

Retired County Supervisor Bob Hammock passes away

Former San Bernardino County Supervisor and former San Bernardino City Councilman Robert L. Hammock passed away on December 12 following a long battle with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. He was 77.

Mr. Hammock was born on November 20, 1940, in Lenwood shortly after his parents migrated to California from Eagle Pass, Texas. In 1944 his family moved to Rialto. Mr. Hammock attended San Bernardino High School, San Bernardino Valley College and Cal Poly Pomona, where he majored in aeronautical engineering. He worked in the title business from 1962 to 1969, and as a civil engineering technician from 1969 until 1976, when he was elected to the Board of Supervisors.

He served on the Board of Supervisors from 1976 through 1992, serving twice as Chairman of the Board. Prior to that, Mr. Hammock served for eight years as a member of the San Bernardino City Council.

Mr. Hammock served as president of what is now known as the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority and San Bernardino Council of Governments, and co-chaired the earliest efforts to redevelop the former Norton Air Force Base in San Bernardino. He was also a candidate for Congress in 1990 and 1992.

He also served on the San Bernardino County Criminal Justice Planning Committee and the governing board of the South Coast Air Quality Management District.

Mr. Hammock was actively involved in many civic activities including the Arrowhead United Way, California Jay-Cees, March of Dimes, Boy Scouts, and many others. He served on numerous Boards and Commissions. During the Vietnam War he conceived and directed “Newspapers for Viet Nam”, a program in which Sunday editions of the San Bernardino Sun-Telegram were mailed to U.S. soldiers serving in Vietnam.

Following his retirement from the Board of Supervisors, Mr. Hammock launched a successful government advocacy firm, Empire Consulting. He enjoyed golf, traveling, and spending time with his family.

Mr. Hammock is survived by his wife, Barbara, sister Linda Butler, brother Kenneth Hammock; children Kathy Martin, Patricia Runzel, and Ralph Hammock and their mother Anita Nix; five grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

Services for Mr. Hammock are private. Mr. Hammock’s family suggested that those who wish to honor and remember the former Supervisor consider supporting the American Cancer Society or the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.

A Message from Board of Supervisors Chairman Robert Lovingood

Fourteen beautiful souls were taken from us and countless others were forever scarred on December 2, 2015.

Although two years have gone by since the terrorist attack at the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, each day we think about those who are no longer with us, those who are still healing physically and emotionally, and the impact this horrific tragedy has had on our San Bernardino County community.

The grief, the anger and the fear remain. We are still unable to grasp what drives this brand of evil.

On that terrible day, the world reached out to San Bernardino County, offered support, thoughts and prayers. The county community wrapped its arms around our County Government family and comforted us through some very dark times.

On December 2 of this year, we will pay special remembrance to those who are no longer with us – husbands, wives, mothers, fathers, sons, daughters, sisters, brothers, neighbors and co-workers – and honor those who suffer still.

On this second anniversary, the County Environmental Health Services family and the Board of Supervisors are asking the public to join us wherever you may be in a moment of remembrance at 10:55 a.m. on Saturday, December 2. At that time the county will pay tribute to those who were taken from us and the survivors on our Twitter and Facebook platforms, and respectively.

If you fly an American flag at home or business, we ask that you lower your flag to half-staff on Saturday in honor of the lives taken and the lives shattered on that day two years ago.

And we ask that you continue to pray for those who are still healing, and show love and appreciation to your families, friends, and neighbors.

Finally, I am pleased to report that a great deal of progress has been made in creating a permanent December 2 memorial. Under the guidance of a memorial committee headed by Fifth District Supervisor Josie Gonzales and including members of the Environmental Health family, the county is close to selecting a consultant with experience in public arts and memorials to guide and facilitate our search for an artist to design the memorial.

After the tragedy of December 2, I and the other members of the Board of Supervisors vowed to stand together and help our county emerge stronger than ever before. We continue to hold each other up while offering assistance to the growing number of communities across our country who fall victim to this kind of violence and terror. We will never forget. We are SB Strong.

Many continue to struggle from the events of December 2, 2015. Avenues of assistance are available:


  • The SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline is available to help and support for any distress that you or someone you care about may be feeling related to any disaster, including violence. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746. Available 24/7. Spanish speakers text Hablanos to 66746.


  • The County Department of Behavioral Health Community Crisis Response Team is a community-based mobile crisis response team for those experiencing a psychiatric emergency. Available 24/7. East Valley: (909) 421-9233, High Desert: (760) 956-2345, West Valley: (909) 458-1517, and Morongo Basin: (760) 499-4429.


  • The County Department of Behavioral Health Access Unit provides connections to behavioral health crisis services to all of San Bernardino County as well as member services and access to behavioral health services for all beneficiaries of San Bernardino County Medi-Cal. Available 24/7. (888) 743-1478 or (909) 386-8256.

Board selects County CFO Gary McBride as next County CEO

County Chief Financial Officer Gary McBride, a lifelong San Bernardino County resident who has spent his entire 23-year professional career working his way through the county government organization, earning knowledge and trust along the way, was appointed

today by the Board of Supervisors to serve as the county’s next chief executive officer effective Nov. 25.

Board members praised McBride’s dedication to the county organization and the community, his commitment to innovation in the cause of public service, and his ability to grasp and translate into lay terms complex issues and provide sound, trustworthy advice.

Board members also praised Interim CEO Dena M. Smith for leading the organization during the past seven months since the retirement of former CEO Greg Devereaux. Smith, who plans to retire and was not a candidate for the CEO position, will stay on board to assist in McBride’s transition.

“You don’t get this far in your career without the support of a great family,” McBride, 46, told the board today. “Thank you for the confidence from the board. We have some great things headed our way, a lot of opportunities, and I am excited to share in the future with all five of you.”

The board conducted an exhaustive seven-month recruitment and interview process prior to appointing McBride as CEO. The board conducted more than 34 interviews over the course of 12 meetings with candidates from within county government, other public agencies and the private sector.

“Gary’s integrity, strong financial background and experience with the county made him the stand-out candidate for Chief Executive Officer of San Bernardino County,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Robert A. Lovingood. “I have trusted his advice in the past and look forward to working with him as we pursue the opportunities ahead.”

“Gary McBride has provided outstanding leadership and skillful financial management for over four years as Chief Financial Officer for the County of San Bernardino,” said Board of Supervisors Vice Chairman Curt Hagman. “I have benefitted from his wise counsel, innovative management style and commitment to accept nothing but the best from himself and all those around him. Gary will make an outstanding CEO and I look forward to working with him and my Board colleagues in making San Bernardino County the best run county government in America.”

“We went through an extensively thorough process of interviewing a number of uniquely qualified individuals,” said Fifth District Supervisor Josie Gonzales. “It was through each supervisor’s individual path of discovery that my colleagues and I came together to select the individual who would best help us realize our hopes and projects to better serve our residents. It is imperative that we, as a county family, view ourselves as visionaries and a flagship for implementing new ideas. Mr. McBride embodies the kind of talent that exists within our family.”

“Gary is incredibly smart and thoughtful, and he is eager to explore new ideas,” said Second District Supervisor Janice Rutherford. “He has a passion for this organization and a genuine, deep commitment to the County team that will serve him well in this new leadership role.”

“I am confident Mr. McBride, with his abundant wealth of institutional knowledge, will excel our county towards greater heights and into new horizons,” said Third District Supervisor James Ramos. “I proudly join the Board of Supervisors as we wish him great success and look forward to working with him to strengthen our county.”

The chief executive officer is county government’s top non-elected position. The CEO works closely with the Board of Supervisors to develop the board’s goals and objectives and administers and coordinates the operations of county government in accordance with the policies established by the board.

McBride holds a bachelor’s degree in economics, graduating with departmental honors, and a master’s degree in public administration, earning the program’s Outstanding Graduate Student of the Year award, from Cal State San Bernardino. Last year he was named to the university’s College of Social and Behavioral Sciences Hall of Fame. McBride has also participated in the Leadership Decision Making course offered through Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government Executive Education program.

McBride has guest lectured for Cal State San Bernardino, set up an economics scholarship fund for CSUSB students, serves on the CSUSB Economics Department’s scholarship committee, and serves on the Advisory Board of the CSUSB Department of Public Administration.

McBride began his career with the county in 1994 as a fiscal clerk in Human Services. He was promoted to staff analyst in Public Health in 1996, administrative analyst in the County Administrative Office in 2000, Public Health division chief in 2002, deputy executive officer in the County Administrative Office in 2006, and county chief financial officer in 2013.

As CFO, McBride is responsible for the development of budget recommendations, monitoring and forecasting the county’s $5.2 billion annual budget as well as its $1 billion in outstanding debt. In his capacity as CFO he also serves as chairman and board member of a number of oversight and advisory boards and corporations. Under his leadership, the county has received several Distinguished Budget Presentation Awards from the Government Finance Officers Association. Recently, as a result of his work as chairman of the committee set up to restructure the county’s retirement savings plan, the county received a national award for the comprehensive restructuring of its savings plan.

McBride served on the founding board of the Animals Are First Fund, a nonprofit corporation dedicated to supporting animal care and control and animal rescue groups throughout the county.

He also serves as treasurer of the Los Angeles Region of Destination Imagination, a nonprofit organization that conducts an annual international problem-solving and critical thinking competition with a focus on science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics.  He is also the assistant manager of his son’s Destination Imagination team, which has won the world championship tournament, conducted at the University of Tennessee, in three of the past five years against competition from around the world.

Board names Michelle Blakemore to top legal post

Michelle Blakemore, a trusted and respected attorney who has served the County for 28 years, was appointed County Counsel by the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday.

Blakemore joined the Office of County Counsel in 1989 as a Deputy County Counsel and was promoted to Principal Assistant County Counsel in January 2009. In December 2010, she was named to her current position as Chief Assistant County Counsel.

The Office of County Counsel provides civil legal services to the Board of Supervisors, the County Administrative Office, County departments, commissions, special districts and school districts. County Counsel also provides legal services to various joint powers authorities.

“Michelle has been very effective as Chief Assistant County Counsel,” said Robert A. Lovingood, Chairman of the Board of Supervisors. “Her appointment as County Counsel is well deserved and I know the public will be well served by her integrity, commitment and experience in the law.”

The County departments Blakemore has served over the years include Purchasing, Community Development and Housing, the Economic Development Agency, the Redevelopment Agency, Special Districts and the Administrative Office. Blakemore has a strong background in municipal finance, public law and real property transactions.

Curt Hagman, Vice Chairman of the Board of Supervisors, said Blakemore’s experience with the County has been marked by unquestioned integrity, hard work and legal brilliance.

“She is extremely knowledgeable and a skillful legal strategist,” Hagman said. “Michelle is an up-through-the-ranks success story, and I am proud to support her as our new County Counsel. My colleagues and I will be depending on her for guidance in navigating complex legal issues facing San Bernardino County and I know she will be a tremendous asset for us.”

“Michelle is a consummate legal professional, and her breadth of knowledge about the County will be extremely important as we work through complex legal challenges in the years to come,” said Second District Supervisor Janice Rutherford.

Fifth District Supervisor Josie Gonzales said Blakemore is the perfect choice to lead the Office of County Counsel.

“Her appointment is an excellent example of how succession planning should be exercised, leading to a smoother transition for the department and the legal advisement for our County,” Gonzales said.  “As a Board we came together on this selection to promote a dedicated, hard-working member of our County family. I am extremely pleased with the process and our choosing Michelle to lead our legal team.”

Blakemore graduated cum laude from the University of Southern California, majoring in public affairs with a concentration in public policy. She earned her juris doctorate at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Law. Blakemore began her career in Los Angeles as a public finance attorney specializing in utility, airport and healthcare financing and then on to Philadelphia, where she specialized in hospital financing. Before joining the County, Blakemore spent three years working for an Orange County law firm representing schools.

“With over two decades of serving our county as a legal professional, Ms. Blakemore has my trust and respect to lead us as our new County Counsel,” said Third District Supervisor James Ramos. “We are privileged to have a team of a knowledgeable and experienced individuals providing us with sound legal advice.  I extend my congratulations to Ms. Blakemore and I look forward to working with her in the future.”

Blakemore will lead a staff of about 100 employees, including 53 attorneys. Blakemore begins the job on Nov. 25 following the retirement of County Counsel Jean-Rene Basle.

County wins 40 awards from National Association of Counties

San Bernardino County programs ending veteran homelessness, advancing literacy, and saving citrus trees are among 40 groundbreaking initiatives that won 2017 Achievement Awards from the National Association of Counties (NACo).

The Public Defender and the Department of Behavioral Health also won a Best in Category Achievement Award for the Everyone SWIMS program which addresses the continuing problem of unnecessary hospitalization and incarceration of individuals with psychological distress and mental disorders. Everyone SWIMS stands for Self-sufficient, Well-being, In-house, Mental health services and the program helps increase access to outpatient and crisis stabilization services to the indigent population facing criminal charges.

“The County continues to be a national leader because we are always thinking of new and different ways to improve lives and save taxpayer dollars,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Robert A. Lovingood. “I am proud of our employees for providing top-notch services and professionalism to our county residents.”

Since 2010, San Bernardino County has garnered 242 awards from NACo, an organization that honors innovative, effective county government programs that enhance services for residents.

Nationally, awards are given in 18 different categories that reflect the vast, comprehensive services counties provide. The categories include children and youth, criminal justice, county administration, information technology, health, civic engagement and many more.

The Board of Supervisors will recognize and honor the people and departments responsible for the winning programs and services below at an upcoming public meeting:

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State examines county’s handling of Dec. 2 workers’ comp cases

An investigation by the state into the county’s handling of workers’ compensation cases related to the Dec. 2, 2015 terrorist attack in San Bernardino found that treatment denials have been rare, indicates delays have been caused chiefly by doctors failing to submit information needed to approve treatments, and credits the county with establishing a model for dealing with incidents of this nature by hiring nurse case SB Strong Logo 1managers to facilitate treatment requests.

“The Board of Supervisors has shared the frustration expressed by many of the survivors when delays and denials have occurred,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Robert A. Lovingood.

“No workers’ compensation program anywhere in the country has ever been called upon to serve such a large number of seriously injured and traumatized survivors of a terror attack,” Chairman Lovingood said. “This has been unchartered territory for the county, for the doctors, and most certainly for the survivors. But the state’s investigation shows the county has worked hard and effectively to ensure safe, and complete care for the employees injured during this horrific attack. This has been the county’s priority since that fateful day.”

Click here to view the report.

The numbers contained in the report bear out that denials, although frustrating when they occur, were the exception rather than the rule.

There have been a total of 2,146 requests for treatment from health care providers serving the 58 survivors being treated through workers’ compensation. 2,000 of those 2,146 requests for surgeries, prescriptions, physical therapy, counseling, and other medical treatments were approved. Among the 144 treatments that were denied, 68 appeals were filed by 11 employees. Only nine of the denials, representing less than one half of 1 percent of the total number of requests, were overturned on appeal.

Delays are more difficult to define and measure. However, the state’s investigation found a significant number of cases involving “a provider’s failure to provide an adequate clinical rationale or appropriate documentation to justify requests for extended or new prescriptions, extended or alternative therapies, or special equipment that veered away from standard medical treatment guidelines and limits.“

A lack of adequate information would have rendered the county unable to approve a treatment in a timely manner. In some cases, employees complained to the county about not having treatments approved before the county had even received requests from their providers.

“Often because (employees’) doctors had failed to document or fully explain their requests, employees who were still suffering and expected their doctors’ recommendations to be followed were frustrated by the denials,” said George Parisotto, Acting Administrative Director for the state Division of Workers’ Compensation, in a letter accompanying the report.

“The fact that several requests were denied and then authorized upon further review suggests that better communication by providers to the County’s claims administrators and better documentation at the time requests were first submitted might have reduced the number of UR (utilization review) denials and IMR (independent medical review) requests,” the report stated.

The report also pointed out:

–Because the county employees who were injured that day were on the job, “the County’s employees were both entitled and required to seek compensation from the County through California’s workers’ compensation system,” which is designed to prevent employers from interfering in the treatment of injured workers.

–“Workers’ compensation is, by design, very detailed and formulaic in specifying what compensation is due for specific types of injuries.” State fee schedules govern what must be paid for specific treatments. Any deviation has to be justified by the patient’s doctor. This is significant because in some cases treatments were denied because what the doctors wanted to charge far exceeded the state fee schedule.

–“Similar to Medicare and private health insurance plans”, workers’ compensation requires employers to have a utilization review program. “A decision to deny or modify a request can only be made by a licensed physician with expertise in the clinical issues raised,” the report stated.

Board invites applications for West Valley Water District Board appointment

The Board of Supervisors invites residents of the West Valley Water District to apply for an appointment to the district’s Board of Directors.

The November election created a vacancy on the five-member water board. The remaining water board members were unable to reach a maxresdefaultconsensus on who to appoint to the vacant seat and asked the Board of Supervisors to make the appointment, which the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday agreed to do at its March 7 meeting.

The West Valley Water District provides drinking water to customers in portions of Rialto, Colton, Fontana, Bloomington and other unincorporated areas of San Bernardino County, and a portion of Jurupa Valley in Riverside County. District boundaries and other information about the district are available here.

Water district residents are invited to apply for consideration to be appointed to the open seat by 5 p.m. on Feb. 24. The Board of Supervisors created a special advisory committee consisting of Second District Supervisor Janice Rutherford and Fifth District Supervisor Josie Gonzales to interview the applicants and recommend an appointment to the full Board of Supervisors.

The person appointed by the Board of Supervisors to the water board on March 7 will have the option of running for election to the remainder of the seat’s full four-year term in the Nov. 7 election. The term for the vacant water board seat expires on Dec. 6, 2019.

The application and other information about the appointment are available here.

Application forms are also available at:

Clerk of the Board of Supervisors/County Government Center/385 N. Arrowhead Ave. – 2nd Floor/San Bernardino, CA 92415-0130

West Valley Water District/855 West Base Line Road/Rialto, CA 92376

Applications must be received physically or electronically by the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors no later than 5 p.m. on Feb. 24. Physical receipt must be at the above San Bernardino address of the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors. Electronic receipt must be at Applications that fail to comply with this procedure cannot be considered.

Additional information is available by calling the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors at (909) 387-3841.

Board appoints Dena Smith interim CEO, launches recruitment

Dena M. Smith, the County’s Chief Operating Officer, will serve as Interim Chief Executive Officer beginning on April 1 while a nationwide recruitment is conducted for a new CEO, the Board of Supervisors unanimously decided in closed session today.

dena-smith-web“The Board has the utmost confidence in Dena’s ability to carry out Board policy and lead the County organization as we conduct our due diligence to ensure we make the best choice for our next CEO,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Robert Lovingood. “The Board has directed County Human Resources to hire a recruitment firm and open the recruitment to internal and external candidates.”

Chief Executive Officer Greg Devereaux, who has served as CEO for seven years, will continue to serve the County in an advisory capacity per the terms of his 10-year contract. Earlier this month Mr. Devereaux announced his decision to retire as CEO and step into the role of advisor.

“I thank the Board and the County for a wonderful opportunity to be here and serve,” Mr. Devereaux said today following the Board’s announcement.

Ms. Smith has been with the County since 1999, serving first as Chief Learning Officer then as Clerk of the Board and Director of Land Use Services. She was promoted to Deputy Executive Officer in 2011 and to Chief Operating Officer last year. As COO, Ms. Smith is the principal assistant to the CEO for operational and administrative issues. She assists in the implementation of policies and directives from the Board of Supervisors and oversees the Government Relations, Legislative Affairs, Public Information and Special Projects Units of the County Administrative Office.

Ms. Smith will be the first African-American and only the second woman to serve the County as its chief executive or chief administrator on an interim or permanent basis.

“The faith placed in me by the Board of Supervisors is truly humbling, and the opportunity to follow in the footsteps of someone as effective and as successful as Greg Devereaux is an honor,” Ms. Smith said. “It will be a pleasure to serve this Board, and to work with and lead the talented, hard-working people that make our County a great organization.”

Born and raised in the Bronx, New York, Ms. Smith earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology from Fairfield University in Fairfield, Conn., and then relocated to California, where she earned her master’s degree in psychobiology from UC Irvine.

Ms. Smith has worked for more than 30 years in San Bernardino County. In 1984, she joined the San Bernardino Public Employees Association where she worked for 10 years representing public employees in labor negotiations, grievances and disciplinary appeals. In 1994, she went to the San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools as the Human Resources Program Manager managing credentials, benefits and training. She also oversaw the establishment and operation of the Educational Resource Centers in Rancho Cucamonga and Apple Valley.

Her various roles with the County have given her valuable experience in various aspects of County Government and in coping with management challenges. She was the first person to hold the titles of Chief Learning Officer and Chief Operating Officer, positions in which she defined new functions for the County.

Devereaux announces retirement as CEO & move into advisory role

After nearly 40 years in public service, 25 of those years in the Inland Empire, Greg Devereaux announced today that he will retire from his role as San Bernardino County Chief Executive Officer by the end of the current fiscal year. Mr. Devereaux joined County Government in February 2010 after successful tenures as city manager in Fontana and Ontario.

“I wish to thank the Board of Supervisors, all of the County’s employees and the entire community for the opportunity to serve in this capacity,” Mr. Devereaux said. “It has been a great privilege.”

The Board of Supervisors will discuss the transition and Mr. Devereaux’s replacement as CEO in closed session on Tuesday.devereauxgregory-02_5x7-300-2

Under the terms of his contract, Mr. Devereaux will continue to work with the County for the next three years advising the Board and his successor on programs and matters affecting the County. He will also retain and expand his involvement in various academic endeavors and provide consultation to various local and regional government agencies.

“I will probably remain as busy as I am now. But I will have more flexibility than I do as CEO to devote needed attention to my family,” said Mr. Devereaux, who turned 65 this past summer.

The Board hired Mr. Devereaux as County Government faced significant organizational and fiscal challenges. He has worked with the Board to redefine how San Bernardino County government operates, creating practices and processes that emphasize accountability, transparency and fiscal responsibility.

“I was hoping to work with Greg throughout my chairmanship,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Robert Lovingood. “Greg’s knowledge and ability to work with the Board to address the County’s challenges will be missed. He is well respected in the local government and business communities.”

“Greg Devereaux is a man of integrity and intelligence who has served the people of this county admirably,” said Second District Supervisor Janice Rutherford. “His fiscal discipline and eagerness to tear down unproductive bureaucratic silos have allowed the county to return to its core functions as well as lead regional conversations about education, the economy and much more. As a Board member, I will miss his daily presence and as a friend, I wish him and his family the very best.”

“Greg’s contacts in Sacramento and Washington and throughout Southern California and his knowledge of government have served the Board and the County well,” said Board of Supervisors Vice Chairman Curt Hagman. “Greg played a key role working with me and other local leaders to return Ontario International Airport to local control. As the newest member of the Board, I had been looking forward to working with Greg as CEO throughout my time on the Board. I am glad he will still be available to us in an advisory role.”

“Greg has been a trusted and knowledgeable advisor through the years and he has worked effectively to help the Board of Supervisors achieve its goals,” said Third District Supervisor James Ramos. “During good times and times of difficulty, we have worked together as a team to move forward in San Bernardino County in service to our residents and future generations.”

“When we hired Greg, we wanted to take the County in a new, positive direction. Greg understood what we meant by that and he worked very hard under sometimes difficult circumstances to help us achieve our vision of an ethical, responsive, compassionate, and effective County organization,” said Fifth District Supervisor Josie Gonzales. “I am committed to ensuring we continue in this positive direction.”

“Since my appointment to Sheriff in 2012, it has been a privilege to work with Greg Devereaux,” said Sheriff John McMahon. “Greg is a strong supporter of public safety and he worked with the Board of Supervisors to increase the Sheriff’s Department’s budget to meet the unique challenges we face daily.  This has allowed us to grow as an organization, renovate existing facilities, acquire a much-needed crime lab and aviation facility. During the December 2 terrorist attack, Greg demonstrated outstanding leadership by ensuring the resources we needed were available to deal with the initial response and the aftermath of the tragic event. I appreciate all of Greg’s support and wish him best of luck in his future endeavors.”

At the time he was hired, Mr. Devereaux became the ninth permanent or interim county chief executive in 12 years. His initial contract called for him to serve for five years, but the Board extended that time and next month he will pass seven years in the role, making him the longest serving county chief executive in more than 20 years.

Read more here.


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