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County Museum

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Artist Bernard Hoyes works open at the County Museum

San Bernardino County Museum is pleased to present a show of works by artist Bernard Hoyes.  “Spirit of the Land Through Climate Change,” an exhibition of large scale watercolors, speaks to the artist’s experience with the ecological life of the desert. The show opens Sunday, Nov. 17 and runs through March 8, 2020. The exhibit opens with a reception on Nov. 17, from 3:30 to 5 p.m.

Hoyes, an artist working in multiple disciplines including performance, painting, watercolor and murals, is a Coachella Valley resident, Jamaican born, African-American, and is primarily recognized as a contemporary painter. His work evolves from a highly intuitive space, capturing spiritual realms on canvas in radiant and brilliant essence. He inspires the viewer to transcend into new dimensions, and regardless of the genre, all of his work has an undercurrent of spirituality. The works in this show reveal a controlled recession of details, plane after plane, allowing the observer to wander into the picture space for a vicarious experience of nature.

Raised into a family rooted in Jamaica’s revivalist church, Hoyes memories of religion and rituals have influenced his artistic productivity throughout his life. His celebration of traditional African religion and spirituality continues to find universal appeal. His work has exhibited at the Museum of African American Art in Los Angeles, Riverside Art Museum, Mission Inn Museum, Palm Springs Art Museum, and others. His mural projects include a large-scale work on the exterior wall Church of St. Paul’s in downtown Palm Springs, and most recently a mural in Kingston, Jamaica as part of the Kingston Creative’s #PaintTheCity project, to revitalize the downtown. His works are in the private collections of Oprah Winfrey, Natalie Cole, Steve Harvey, Helene Galen, Keenan Ivory Wayans and the National Urban League, amongst others.

The San Bernardino County Museum’s exhibits of regional cultural and natural history and the Museum’s other exciting events and programs reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. The exhibit and the exhibit opening reception are included with general admission. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Cosmic Astronomy Nights in November

Telescope viewing at San Bernardino County Museum and Victor Valley Museum

The final two “Cosmic Nights,” of 2019 take place at San Bernardino County Museum on Saturday, Nov. 2 from 8 to 10 p.m., in partnership with the San Bernardino Valley Amateur Astronomers (SBVAA), and in the high desert at Victor Valley Museum, Saturday, Nov. 16, from 8 to 9:30 p.m. in partnership with High Desert Astronomical Society (HiDAS).

The two evenings feature telescope viewing, an opportunity to discuss astronomy with the telescope operators, and visitors are also encouraged to bring binoculars or set up their own telescopes.

On the evening of Nov. 2, Saturn and the Moon can be viewed closely together, a “conjunction” which is an astronomical event when two or more bodies share the same right ascension.

On both dates, Nov. 2 and Nov. 16, there is the possibility of meteor sightings, a result of the Northern Taurid Meteor Showers from late October through early December. Meteors are most visible closer to midnight, but once the sun sets, with patience, these meteors can be visible.

The events take place outdoors, weather permitting, and guests are advised to wear comfortable clothing and shoes. Guests are welcome to set up portable lawn chairs and blankets for extended viewing. Museum galleries will be open during the event and regular admission applies. Tickets are available in advance online by visiting http://www.sbcounty.gov/museum, or may be purchased at the door.

The San Bernardino Valley Amateur Astronomers (SBVAA) organized in 1958 to help amateur astronomers in the San Bernardino Valley area increase their knowledge and excitement in astronomy and spread that knowledge to the community.

The High Desert Astronomical Society is based at the Luz Observatory in Apple Valley.. They were formed to provide trained, volunteer astronomers to operate and maintain the Center’s astronomical equipment

The San Bernardino County Museum’s exhibits of regional, cultural and natural history and the Museum’s other exciting events and programs reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cosmic Nights is included in general admission: $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

The Victor Valley Museum is a branch of the San Bernardino County Museum located at 11873 Apple Valley Road in Apple Valley. The museum is open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cosmic Nights is included in general admission: $5 (adult), $4 (senior or military), and $2.50 (student. EBT cardholders are $1. Children under 5 and San Bernardino County Museum Association members are free. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

African American experience subject at Victor Valley Museum

Hardy Brown II

The Victor Valley Museum is proud to host a remarkable conversation featuring Richard Allen Collins Diggs and Hardy Brown II, two historians with powerful stories about different aspects of the African American experience. The presentation takes place this Saturday, Oct. 19, 3 to 5 p.m. at the Victor Valley Museum, 11873 Apple Valley Rd, Apple Valley.

The emergence of a family bible in 1985 led Richard Diggs to the discovery of 150 years of documents — birth, marriage and death records — to piece together the pre- and post-slave experiences of the Collins family, from Africa to the Americas. Beginning in 1618, Diggs recounts the remarkable family trajectory including the first people to be taken as indentured servants until 1720 when they were forced into chattel slavery. The Collins family bible is on display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C.

The Collins Bible

Hardy Brown II is the Executive Director of the Black Voice Foundation and Curator of Footsteps to You: Chattel Slavery, Objects from the Gore Collection. This award-winning exhibit tells the story of chattel slavery in America through the objects collected by Jerry Gore, a historian whose lifelong goal was to expose the horrors of slavery so that visitors to his hometown of Maysville, Kentucky could appreciate the daily perils experienced by enslaved people as well as the strength it required to fight for their freedom. The collection is now owned and stewarded by the Black Voice Foundation, and will be exhibited at Victor Valley Museum thought December 22.

Event ticket includes a reception of light hors d’oeuvres and tour of the exhibit Footsteps to You: Chattel Slavery.

The Victor Valley Museum and the County Museum’s other exciting events and exhibits reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating the arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The Victor Valley Museum is a branch of the San Bernardino County Museum located at 11873 Apple Valley Road in Apple Valley. Regular museum days and hours are Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission to the talk is included with general admission: $5 (adult), $4 (senior or military), and $2.50 (student), EBT cardholders are $1. Children under 5 and the San Bernardino County Museum Association members are free. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Grizzly Bear exhibit opens at the County Museum

Grizzly specimen, collection of the San Bernardino County Museum. Donor: John C. Belcher

Over the centuries, the relationship that Californians have had with the grizzly bear is one of dualities – expressed in fear and fascination. Although extinct in the state since the early 20th century, the grizzly has long been a central character in California’s history. Illuminating the story of the grizzly is the exhibition “Bear In Mind: The Story of the California Grizzly” which is open at the San Bernardino County Museum through Nov 24.

Scientists estimate that 10,000 grizzlies once lived in California, perhaps the densest population of brown bears on the continent. The California grizzly possessed characteristics that we hold dear: independence, adaptability, resourcefulness, intelligence, and strong maternal care. However, through increased human settlement, loss of habitat, and hunting, nature and development clashed, and the seeming incompatibility resulted in misguided, intolerant, and violent means of eradicating the animal in the state. By the early 1900s the California grizzly had vanished and could only be seen on the state flag. Although the loss of the California grizzly was a tragic lesson, we are not too late to save other threatened and endangered species.

Today, California grizzly bears only exist in our imaginations as symbols of things desired and things lost.  Since the mid-1800s, the grizzly has been used as an icon, advertiser and entertainer, making the image of the bear a familiar one to most people. Little physical evidence remains of the grizzly bears that once roamed California. It is through stories, artifacts, striking images, and hands-on activities that the “Bear In Mind” exhibition provides an in-depth look at the history and science of one of California’s most revered and feared animals.

After viewing this special exhibit, viewers are invited to visit the museum’s permanent Hall of Biodiversity, which includes other animals that are endangered, now extinct, or thrive in our region. Many of the museum’s mammal collection were a donation from John C. Belcher, and a beautifully preserved, significant grizzly specimen from that collection of North American mammals is prominently featured at the entry to the Bear in Mind exhibit.

The “Bear In Mind: The Story of the California Grizzly” exhibition is based on the Heyday Books publication, Bear in Mind: The California Grizzly by Susan Snyder, as well as The Bancroft Library exhibition of the same name.

The “Bear In Mind: The Story of the California Grizzly” exhibition is produced and toured by Exhibit Envoy. The exhibition was developed in concert with The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley and Heyday Books. Exhibit Envoy collaborates with California institutions to create and tour smaller, affordable, high quality exhibitions that enhance civic engagement and human understanding. This exhibition was supported by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation with additional funds from the Bank of the West.

The San Bernardino County Museum’s exhibits of regional cultural and natural history and the Museum’s other exciting events and programs reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. Parking is free. For more information, visit http://www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Prepare for the Great California ShakeOut at the Museum

Annual event features ways to prepare for earthquakes and other natural disasters

Every October, California stages the “Great California ShakeOut,” an opportunity to practice knowledge and skills to handle earthquakes calmly. October 17, 2019 marks the fifth annual statewide event, and the San Bernardino County Museum wants to help residents prepare to “Drop, Cover, and Hold on,” in case of an actual earthquake or natural disaster. Join museum partners on Sunday, Oct. 6, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. for the annual Prepare for the Great California ShakeOut.

The event features the very popular San Bernardino County Office of Emergency Services earthquake simulator, so visitors can experience the strength of an earthquake. Emergency preparedness demos will be given throughout the afternoon. Participating partners include San Bernardino County Office of Emergency Services, Redlands CERT (Community Emergency Response Team), and Red Cross of San Bernardino. LifeStream of San Bernardino will be accepting blood donations. Participants will also get to experiment with tabletop demonstrations about the science of earthquakes and test their knowledge by making their own fault art with clay.

“Earthquakes are on their own schedule, and they can occur at any time wherever we work, live, or travel within the region and beyond,” said Museum Director, Melissa Russo. “Everyone, everywhere should know how to protect themselves from an earthquake. We hope this museum event is an annual reminder to our visitors about the need to prepare.”

The San Bernardino County Museum’s exhibits of regional, cultural and natural history and the Museum’s other exciting events and programs reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Prepare for the Great California ShakeOut is included with general admission: $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. Parking is free. For more information, visit http://www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

New Outdoor Gardens open at San Bernardino County Museum

Spend some quality time in the San Bernardino County Museum’s restored native gardens featuring interpretation and stories about these stunning and sometimes surprising plants. The gardens open to the public on Saturday, July 13. The exhibit is fully bilingual with interpretation in English and Spanish. Chia Café Collective will be at the opening presenting native food tasting.

The Desert Garden, a beloved outdoor exhibit at the museum’s entry, features plants that play an essential role in the survival and success of all other local organisms. California is home to thousands of native plant species that are found nowhere else in the world; however, changes in our climate are threatening the survival of many of these species. How do these plants adapt in order to survive?

The Ethnobotany Garden, off the museum’s interior courtyard, highlights local plants historically stewarded by the local tribal community. Many plants are an important source of food, and many of the plants in our region have been traditionally used for their medicinal properties. With the advancement of science and technology, plants still play an active role in how humans heal. Our garden highlights some of these important plants.

Curator of Integrated Science, Jessika Vazquez, spent months researching and developing stories about the Desert Garden, and how these plants impact the regional eco-system. She said, ““Every part of a plant has a role in its own survival and success as well as in our survival and success. We are very happy to be able to showcase the connection between us and our natural resources, in this case plants. It’s especially exciting to be able to share these stories with our Spanish speaking community!”

Tamara Serrao-Leiva, curator of Anthropology, who consulted closely with Morongo’s Malki Museum, said, “The ethnobotany garden is a shared space. Animals, plants, and humans come together here and live in harmony. It is important to remember that our relationship to the land is symbiotic, and our health is integrally tied to the health of the land, whether it’s physically, emotionally, or spiritually.”

The San Bernardino County Museum’s exhibits of regional cultural and natural history and the Museum’s other exciting events and programs reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Pulp Culture: A Juicy Tale in the Orange Empire opens

The San Bernardino County Museum announces the opening of a new exhibit “Pulp Culture: A Juicy Tale in the Orange Empire.” The exhibit traces the growth and development of the citrus industry in the region, and opens to the public on Sunday, May 19.

“Pulp Culture” is a captivating, bilingual journey through one of the most fascinating periods of our history, starting in the 19th century and continuing to the present day. It is a story of industry, migrant workers, fruit pests, and a visual culture that became intrinsically tied to the region’s citrus groves and packing houses. This addition to the museum’s Hall of History features a community voices station, an interactive packing conveyor belt, art celebrating the citrus culture, and other historical artifacts from the time.

Working with a storytelling group, exhibit curators David Myers, Jennifer Dickerson, Jessika Vazquez, and Tamara Serrao-Leiva, were able to weave a multidisciplinary narrative drawing on diverse cultural history and science. The story advisors are experts in their fields and included Steven Moreno-Terrill and Megan Suster, from California Citrus State Historic Park; educators Tom and Lily Rivera; members of the Cultural Resources Management Department at San Manuel Band of Mission Indians; and Genevieve Preston, from San Bernardino County Archives.

David Myers, Curator of Visitor Engagement & Exhibits said “It is our team’s intention to always try to develop complete stories that are reflective and representative of our entire community. Pulp Culture was designed around this idea, that people who worked in, and developed the citrus industry and culture should have the opportunity to tell their own history. In this exhibit, visitors can listen to the memories of people who were employed in the citrus industry and who contributed to the shared citrus culture, and can record their own personal citrus stories in our community voices station.” 

The San Bernardino County Museum’s exhibits of regional cultural and natural history and the Museum’s other exciting events and programs reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Train Days Rolls into County Museums

San Bernardino County Museum and Victor Valley Museum will host Train Clubs

Calling locomotive lovers of all ages! Train Days is rolling back into the San Bernardino County Museums in Redlands and Apple Valley, April 6 to 14. This popular annual event features intricate, operating model trains, a riding train, and family programming.

At the San Bernardino County Museum in Redlands, the event opens with an “Off the Rails” dance party for families from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Model train layouts will be running throughout the museum and a trackless train will be available for ticketed rides on the weekends. Train clubs participating include the ZoCal Z-scale Group, N-Land Pacific Modular Club, Green River Junction Railroad, and the Orange County N’Gineers who will be leading instructions on module building for visitors. Rail safety education organization Operation Lifesaver will be providing safety information.

At Victor Valley Museum, model train layouts will fill the museum for the weeklong event by returning local train clubs Antelope Valley N’ Scalers and Sun City Train Club. Featured are daily train activities and crafts for families, and a “chugging” photo booth station. A trackless train will be available for ticketed rides on the weekends. Event partners include Mojave National Preserve: Kelso Depot and Route 66 Mother Road Museum both sharing High Desert railroad history and its role within the community, and rail safety education organization Operation Lifesaver.

Train Days and the County Museum’s other exciting events and exhibits reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). EBT cardholders are $1. Children under 5 and Museum Association members are admitted free.

The Victor Valley Museum is in Apple Valley at 11873 Apple Valley Road. This branch museum is open Wednesdays through Sundays; admission is $5 (adult), $4 (military or senior), and $2.50 (student or child),

EBT cardholders are $1.Children under 5 and Museum Association members are admitted free.

Train Days is included with museum admission. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum/. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Leading housing policy authority featured at Dome Talks

Rothstein’s book The Color of Law documents the drivers of residential segregation in America

Richard Rothstein, author of The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How our Government Segregated America, is the featured Dome Talks speaker on Thursday, Feb. 28 at the San Bernardino County Museum.

Rothstein, a former New York Times columnist, is a research associate at the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and Haas Institute at the University of California–Berkeley. The Color of Law expands upon and provides a national perspective on his recent work that documents the history of state-sponsored residential segregation, as in his report, “The Making of Ferguson.”

The book examines the common misperception that divisions in communities were primarily the result of individual prejudices, income differences, or the actions of private institutions like banks and real estate agencies. Starting in the 1920s, during a time when millions of African Americans moved in a great historical migration from the south to the north, The Color of Law investigates and exposes the laws and policy decisions — some now forgotten or rescinded — passed by local, state, and federal governments that actually promoted discriminatory patterns that continue to this day.

Museum Director Melissa Russo remarked “the topic of segregation, and how we got there, is a significant historical topic for our region, and a timely one as policies around housing continue to evolve today. By hosting a speaker like Richard Rothstein, the museum can play a unique role in helping to interpret and define this history and how it applies to the Inland Empire, in order to engender conversations and policies that help shape future decisions.”

All Dome Talks evenings open at 6:30 p.m. for a light reception sponsored by the San Bernardino County Museum Association. Rothstein’s talk starts at 7 p.m. and will include sales of his book and signing.

Tickets for the evening are $25 ($18 museum members), subject to availability as the Dome Talks theater has limited seating. Tickets can be purchased online at www.sbcounty.gov/museum or may be purchased at the Museum’s Guest Services Desk.

The San Bernardino County Museum’s exhibits of regional, cultural and natural history and the Museum’s other exciting events and programs reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. Parking for Dome Talks is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

“Images of Black Culture, Life, & History” at County Museum

Kenneth Gatewood

Twenty-one African American artists featured in show recognizing Black History Month

The San Bernardino County Museum, in partnership with the Southern California Black Chamber of Commerce, Inland Cities, East, presents an exhibit featuring the fine art works of prominent African American artists from throughout Southern California to recognize Black History Month. “Images of Black Culture, Life, & History” opens at the Museum on Feb. 1 and continues through Mar 3.  The Chamber hosts an exhibit reception at the Museum on Thursday, Feb. 7 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Keith Mikell

Guest curated by Charles Bibbs, who also has two works in the show, the artists participating include  Adeola Davies-Ayeloja, Alva, Bernard Hoyes, Christopher J. Wesley, Derrick Dzine, Diana Shannon Young, Emmy Lu, Errol Cook, Keith Mikell, Kenneth Gatewood, Manuelita Brown, Michael Massenburg, Maurice Howard, Nathaniel Bustion, Rosalind McGary, Synthia Saint James, Shaz Taylor, Theresa Shellcroft, Viveca Mays, and Zeal Harris. The show includes paintings, watercolors, collages, ceramics, and quilts.

Curator of visitor engagement and exhibits, David Myers said, “these images are reflective of an array of experiences expressing power, beauty, provocation, hopelessness and hope. Charles Bibbs, with his immense talent and profile in the arts, brought together both established and emerging artists to weave a complex story of the African American experience. We are truly grateful to Charles and the Southern California Black Chamber of Commerce for helping us ensure that our exhibits are representative and reflective of our community both during our Black History Month celebration and all year long.”

The San Bernardino County Museum’s exhibits of regional cultural and natural history and the Museum’s other exciting events and programs reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). EBT card holders and families are admitted for $1. Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. This special exhibit is included with museum general admission. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

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