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County Museum

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New Outdoor Gardens open at San Bernardino County Museum

Spend some quality time in the San Bernardino County Museum’s restored native gardens featuring interpretation and stories about these stunning and sometimes surprising plants. The gardens open to the public on Saturday, July 13. The exhibit is fully bilingual with interpretation in English and Spanish. Chia Café Collective will be at the opening presenting native food tasting.

The Desert Garden, a beloved outdoor exhibit at the museum’s entry, features plants that play an essential role in the survival and success of all other local organisms. California is home to thousands of native plant species that are found nowhere else in the world; however, changes in our climate are threatening the survival of many of these species. How do these plants adapt in order to survive?

The Ethnobotany Garden, off the museum’s interior courtyard, highlights local plants historically stewarded by the local tribal community. Many plants are an important source of food, and many of the plants in our region have been traditionally used for their medicinal properties. With the advancement of science and technology, plants still play an active role in how humans heal. Our garden highlights some of these important plants.

Curator of Integrated Science, Jessika Vazquez, spent months researching and developing stories about the Desert Garden, and how these plants impact the regional eco-system. She said, ““Every part of a plant has a role in its own survival and success as well as in our survival and success. We are very happy to be able to showcase the connection between us and our natural resources, in this case plants. It’s especially exciting to be able to share these stories with our Spanish speaking community!”

Tamara Serrao-Leiva, curator of Anthropology, who consulted closely with Morongo’s Malki Museum, said, “The ethnobotany garden is a shared space. Animals, plants, and humans come together here and live in harmony. It is important to remember that our relationship to the land is symbiotic, and our health is integrally tied to the health of the land, whether it’s physically, emotionally, or spiritually.”

The San Bernardino County Museum’s exhibits of regional cultural and natural history and the Museum’s other exciting events and programs reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Pulp Culture: A Juicy Tale in the Orange Empire opens

The San Bernardino County Museum announces the opening of a new exhibit “Pulp Culture: A Juicy Tale in the Orange Empire.” The exhibit traces the growth and development of the citrus industry in the region, and opens to the public on Sunday, May 19.

“Pulp Culture” is a captivating, bilingual journey through one of the most fascinating periods of our history, starting in the 19th century and continuing to the present day. It is a story of industry, migrant workers, fruit pests, and a visual culture that became intrinsically tied to the region’s citrus groves and packing houses. This addition to the museum’s Hall of History features a community voices station, an interactive packing conveyor belt, art celebrating the citrus culture, and other historical artifacts from the time.

Working with a storytelling group, exhibit curators David Myers, Jennifer Dickerson, Jessika Vazquez, and Tamara Serrao-Leiva, were able to weave a multidisciplinary narrative drawing on diverse cultural history and science. The story advisors are experts in their fields and included Steven Moreno-Terrill and Megan Suster, from California Citrus State Historic Park; educators Tom and Lily Rivera; members of the Cultural Resources Management Department at San Manuel Band of Mission Indians; and Genevieve Preston, from San Bernardino County Archives.

David Myers, Curator of Visitor Engagement & Exhibits said “It is our team’s intention to always try to develop complete stories that are reflective and representative of our entire community. Pulp Culture was designed around this idea, that people who worked in, and developed the citrus industry and culture should have the opportunity to tell their own history. In this exhibit, visitors can listen to the memories of people who were employed in the citrus industry and who contributed to the shared citrus culture, and can record their own personal citrus stories in our community voices station.” 

The San Bernardino County Museum’s exhibits of regional cultural and natural history and the Museum’s other exciting events and programs reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Train Days Rolls into County Museums

San Bernardino County Museum and Victor Valley Museum will host Train Clubs

Calling locomotive lovers of all ages! Train Days is rolling back into the San Bernardino County Museums in Redlands and Apple Valley, April 6 to 14. This popular annual event features intricate, operating model trains, a riding train, and family programming.

At the San Bernardino County Museum in Redlands, the event opens with an “Off the Rails” dance party for families from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Model train layouts will be running throughout the museum and a trackless train will be available for ticketed rides on the weekends. Train clubs participating include the ZoCal Z-scale Group, N-Land Pacific Modular Club, Green River Junction Railroad, and the Orange County N’Gineers who will be leading instructions on module building for visitors. Rail safety education organization Operation Lifesaver will be providing safety information.

At Victor Valley Museum, model train layouts will fill the museum for the weeklong event by returning local train clubs Antelope Valley N’ Scalers and Sun City Train Club. Featured are daily train activities and crafts for families, and a “chugging” photo booth station. A trackless train will be available for ticketed rides on the weekends. Event partners include Mojave National Preserve: Kelso Depot and Route 66 Mother Road Museum both sharing High Desert railroad history and its role within the community, and rail safety education organization Operation Lifesaver.

Train Days and the County Museum’s other exciting events and exhibits reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). EBT cardholders are $1. Children under 5 and Museum Association members are admitted free.

The Victor Valley Museum is in Apple Valley at 11873 Apple Valley Road. This branch museum is open Wednesdays through Sundays; admission is $5 (adult), $4 (military or senior), and $2.50 (student or child),

EBT cardholders are $1.Children under 5 and Museum Association members are admitted free.

Train Days is included with museum admission. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum/. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Leading housing policy authority featured at Dome Talks

Rothstein’s book The Color of Law documents the drivers of residential segregation in America

Richard Rothstein, author of The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How our Government Segregated America, is the featured Dome Talks speaker on Thursday, Feb. 28 at the San Bernardino County Museum.

Rothstein, a former New York Times columnist, is a research associate at the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and Haas Institute at the University of California–Berkeley. The Color of Law expands upon and provides a national perspective on his recent work that documents the history of state-sponsored residential segregation, as in his report, “The Making of Ferguson.”

The book examines the common misperception that divisions in communities were primarily the result of individual prejudices, income differences, or the actions of private institutions like banks and real estate agencies. Starting in the 1920s, during a time when millions of African Americans moved in a great historical migration from the south to the north, The Color of Law investigates and exposes the laws and policy decisions — some now forgotten or rescinded — passed by local, state, and federal governments that actually promoted discriminatory patterns that continue to this day.

Museum Director Melissa Russo remarked “the topic of segregation, and how we got there, is a significant historical topic for our region, and a timely one as policies around housing continue to evolve today. By hosting a speaker like Richard Rothstein, the museum can play a unique role in helping to interpret and define this history and how it applies to the Inland Empire, in order to engender conversations and policies that help shape future decisions.”

All Dome Talks evenings open at 6:30 p.m. for a light reception sponsored by the San Bernardino County Museum Association. Rothstein’s talk starts at 7 p.m. and will include sales of his book and signing.

Tickets for the evening are $25 ($18 museum members), subject to availability as the Dome Talks theater has limited seating. Tickets can be purchased online at www.sbcounty.gov/museum or may be purchased at the Museum’s Guest Services Desk.

The San Bernardino County Museum’s exhibits of regional, cultural and natural history and the Museum’s other exciting events and programs reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. Parking for Dome Talks is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

“Images of Black Culture, Life, & History” at County Museum

Kenneth Gatewood

Twenty-one African American artists featured in show recognizing Black History Month

The San Bernardino County Museum, in partnership with the Southern California Black Chamber of Commerce, Inland Cities, East, presents an exhibit featuring the fine art works of prominent African American artists from throughout Southern California to recognize Black History Month. “Images of Black Culture, Life, & History” opens at the Museum on Feb. 1 and continues through Mar 3.  The Chamber hosts an exhibit reception at the Museum on Thursday, Feb. 7 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Keith Mikell

Guest curated by Charles Bibbs, who also has two works in the show, the artists participating include  Adeola Davies-Ayeloja, Alva, Bernard Hoyes, Christopher J. Wesley, Derrick Dzine, Diana Shannon Young, Emmy Lu, Errol Cook, Keith Mikell, Kenneth Gatewood, Manuelita Brown, Michael Massenburg, Maurice Howard, Nathaniel Bustion, Rosalind McGary, Synthia Saint James, Shaz Taylor, Theresa Shellcroft, Viveca Mays, and Zeal Harris. The show includes paintings, watercolors, collages, ceramics, and quilts.

Curator of visitor engagement and exhibits, David Myers said, “these images are reflective of an array of experiences expressing power, beauty, provocation, hopelessness and hope. Charles Bibbs, with his immense talent and profile in the arts, brought together both established and emerging artists to weave a complex story of the African American experience. We are truly grateful to Charles and the Southern California Black Chamber of Commerce for helping us ensure that our exhibits are representative and reflective of our community both during our Black History Month celebration and all year long.”

The San Bernardino County Museum’s exhibits of regional cultural and natural history and the Museum’s other exciting events and programs reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). EBT card holders and families are admitted for $1. Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. This special exhibit is included with museum general admission. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Black History Art Exhibit at the County Museum

In honor of Black History Month, the Southern California Black Chamber of Commerce, Inland Cities East will be hosting its annual Black Art Exhibit at the San Bernardino County Museum.

This year local renowned artist Charles Bibbs is the curator for the 2019 Black Art Exhibit, which is themed “Images of Black Life, Culture and History.”

The exhibit will run from Friday, Feb. 1 until Sunday, March 3.

A reception will also he held on Thursday, Feb. 7 from 5 to 8 p.m. which will include the artists, local dignitaries along with business and community leaders.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane in Redlands.

Read this flyer for more information on the event.

County Museum announces 2019 Dome Talks Speaker Series

The San Bernardino County Museum announces the speakers confirmed for the 2019 Dome Talks series. The lineup of national authors and thought leaders address timely, serious, quirky, and critical issues. These evening discussions are scheduled monthly from January through June. Full Series Passes, which include a ticket for each evening, are now on sale. Individual tickets go on sale beginning Dec. 14.

Museum Director Melissa Russo remarked “Dome Talks has been a tremendous success bringing notable speakers to the San Bernardino County Museum. This upcoming third season of fascinating individuals promises discussions that will be stimulating, entertaining, and hopefully deeply thought provoking.”

Dome Talks commences on the evening of Jan. 17, with Kirk W. Johnson, author of The Feather Thief: Beauty, Obsession, and the Natural History Heist of the Century, his investigation into the true crime story of the theft of 299 rare bird skins from a British natural history museum. Johnson brilliantly traces a narrative from the 19th century to present day about exotic bird exploration, ornithological research, the obscure and quirky world of Victorian fly-tying, and rare bird trafficking.

On Feb. 28, Richard Rothstein, discusses his book The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of how Our Government Segregated America. Rothstein, a former New York Times columnist, is a research associate at the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and Haas Institute at the University of California–Berkeley. The Color of Law expands upon and provides a national perspective on his recent work that documents the history of state-sponsored residential segregation, as in his report, “The Making of Ferguson.”

On Mar. 28, Heather David, cultural historian and advocate for the preservation of mid-century modern architecture, art, and signage, speaks about her book Motel California. The story of the rapid rise and subsequent decline of the individually owned mom-and-pop motel in The Golden State, Motel California is a celebration of sparkling blue pools, flashing neon signs, automatic ice machines and bleached white towels. It is an exploration of theme-based marketing and a documentation of American culture at perhaps what was the most prosperous time in United States history.

On Apr. 25, Francis French, co-author of  Falling to Earth: An Apollo 15 Astronaut’s Journey to the Moon, discusses his career co-writing four bestselling space history books and  interviews with astronauts Wally Schirra, Gordon Cooper, Scott Carpenter, Pavel Popovich, and Al Worden. Currently the Director of Education at the San Diego Air & Space Museum,  French is a regular presence on PBS, The Discovery Channel, History Channel and Science Channel.

Rue Mapp speaks on May 30 about the organization she founded, Outdoor Afro, a nonprofit social community reconnecting African Americans with natural spaces through outdoor recreational activities. The evening is co-sponsored by the Girl Scouts of San Gorgonio and San Bernardino County Regional Parks. Through Outdoor Afro, Mapp shares opportunities to build a broader community and leadership in nature. Her important work has generated widespread national recognition including The Root 100 most influential African Americans in the country, the Outdoor Industry Inspiration Award, the National Wildlife Federation Communication award, and Family Circle Magazine selected Rue as one of America’s 20 Most Influential Moms.

June 20 is the final speaker in the series, Danna Staaf, author of Squid Empire: The Rise and Fall of the Cephalopods, an epic adventure spanning hundreds of millions of years, from the marine life of the primordial ocean to the calamari on tonight’s menu. The Inquisitive Biologist’s review noted “This, ladies and gentlemen, is how you write a good popular academic book.” Anyone who enjoys the undersea world—along with those obsessed with all things prehistoric—will be interested in the sometimes enormous, often bizarre creatures that ruled the seas long before the first dinosaurs.

All Dome Talks evenings open at 6:30 p.m. for a light reception sponsored by the San Bernardino County Museum Association. Presentations start at 7 p.m. and include book sale and signing where applicable. Books are available for sale in the Museum store starting in November.

Full Series Passes are on sale for $130 ($105 museum members) and include all six evenings. Tickets for individual evenings will go on sale December 14 for $25 each evening ($18 museum members, no discount applies for May 30) and are subject to availability as the Dome Talks theater has limited seating. Tickets can be purchased online at www.sbcounty.gov/museum or may be purchased at the Museum’s Guest Services Desk. Advance ticket purchase is strongly encouraged as walkups are not guaranteed. No refunds can be made for ticket purchases, but unused tickets may be donated to the nonprofit San Bernardino County Museum Association in advance of the date.

The San Bernardino County Museum’s exhibits of regional cultural and natural history and the Museum’s other exciting events and programs, including Dome Talks reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Live sheep shearing and yarn spinning on display

Live sheep shearing and yarn spinning – how wool clothing gets made – has changed little over the centuries and will be on full display at Sheep to Shawl at the San Bernardino County Museum on Saturday, Sept. 29, from noon to 4 p.m.

To make a piece of natural fiber clothing artisans start with the plant or animal to furnish the material from which it is made: a sheep, goat, rabbit, llama, or plant fibers. Natural textiles are based on these fibers, whether fleece, fur, hair, or plant. During Sheep to Shawl, Museum visitors will be able to meet fur and fleece-bearing animals thanks to the University of California Cooperative Extension 4-H club members and Southern California Sheep/Wool.  Members of the local 4-H program will demonstrate how a live sheep is sheared (1 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.) and how the wool is cleaned by removing twigs and less savory bits of debris. Volunteers from local textile groups, and skilled artisans will demonstrate carding wool so the fibers lay straight, spinning them into thread, and weaving the threads into cloth.

Hands-on opportunities to touch fleeces, spin, design, and weave bracelets and potholders will be offered along with demonstrations of spinning and weaving by the Southern California Handweavers Guild and the Crosstwisters lacemaking group.  At 1:30 p.m. youth from the 4-H program will hold a wool fashion show.

Visitors can also walk through the museum’s ethnobotany and native plant gardens to see sources of plant fibers used by Native Americans. Activities are suitable for all ages.

Curator of Education Carolina Zataray said, “this process of construction exists in nearly every article of winter-based clothing we wear, yet most of our visitors know very little of how their sweater or coat was made. We’re excited to work with these partners to show off the skills necessary to go from sheep to shawl.”

Sheep to Shawl and the Museum’s other exciting programs and exhibits reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Summer movie series opens at the Victor Valley Museum

“Wrinkle in Time” first in the summer lineup

Join us for popcorn and movies this summer! The Victor Valley Museum’s summer movie series starts on Sunday, July 29, with a screening of the 2018 film “Wrinkle in Time.” The film will start at noon, and the movie and refreshments are included with museum general admission.

“Wrinkle in Time,” released into theaters in 2018, tells the story of Meg, her brother, and her friend who search for Meg’s scientist father across the universe, with the help of three magical beings. This PG-rated fantasy adventure film is based on the book by Madeleine L’Engle. The New York Times said, “‘A Wrinkle in Time’ is demonstratively generous, encouraging and large-spirited. Though it is full of bright colors and passages of visual dazzle, it trusts words more than images, spelling out messages about love, courage and self-acceptance.”

On August 10, the series continues with “The Cowboy and the Senorita,” the 1941 classic B western that marks the first appearance of Roy Rogers and Dale Evans together on the silver screen. “Paddington 2” will screen on Saturday, August 25.

Summer movies at the Victor Valley Museum and the County Museum’s other exciting events and exhibits reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.”

The Victor Valley Museum is a branch of the San Bernardino County Museum located at 11873 Apple Valley Road in Apple Valley. The museum is open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $5 (adult), $4 (senior or military), and $2.50 (student. EBT cardholders are $1. Children under 5 and San Bernardino County Museum Association members are free. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

Big Trucks & Engineering Focus of Museum Public Works Day

The San Bernardino County Museum hosts the popular annual Public Works Day on Saturday, June 2, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The day features a wide variety of hands-on activities related to engineering and science, in partnership with the San Bernardino County Department of Public Works.

Started by the American Public Works Association in 1960, National Public Works Week is a celebration of the tens of thousands of men and women in North America who provide and maintain the infrastructure and services collectively known as public works.

“’The theme for the 2018 National Public Works Week, ‘The Power of Public Works,’ gives voice to the impact the many facets of public works have on modern civilization,” said Kevin Blakeslee, director of County Public Works. “From providing clean water to disposing of solid waste, to building roads and bridges and removing snow on roadways, to the construction of dams, channels and levees to control flooding, or devising emergency management strategies to meet natural or manmade disasters, public works services play a significant role in a society’s quality of life. The Department of Public Works expresses its sincere thanks to the County Museum for hosting this event that will provide some fun, hands-on education to our residents as to how the Department of Public Works serves them.”

“Our Public Works Day continues to be a popular event,” said Museum Director Melissa Russo. “The big trucks and equipment are an obvious draw, and it’s a great opportunity for the public to learn what these regional projects involve, and how quality of life in our county is dependent on the thoughtfulness and quality of these infrastructure developments.”

Activities and demonstrations at the museum are especially designed to engage children and families with hands-on learning: create a glider, conduct experiments, explore with a storm drain robot, find yourself with the County Surveyor, learn to keep storm drains clean with Environmental Management, and recycle with Solid Waste Management, have your photo taken in a giant snow blower.

Hands-on learning activities related to science and technology and the County Museum’s other exciting events and exhibits reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). EBT cardholders are admitted for $1. Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. All activities are included with museum admission. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

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