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Affordable housing units for veterans available in Loma Linda

The Housing Authority of the County of San Bernardino and the San Bernardino County Community Development and Housing Agency invites military veterans to apply for spots on the waiting list for 36 brand-new 2- and 3-bedroom apartments at Loma Linda Veterans Village.

Apartments come with refrigerators and dishwashers, while the community includes a club room with kitchen, basketball court, swimming pool, volleyball court, laundry facilities, computer lab and on-site management. Mobility-impaired households will have priority for nine units designed for their needs and hearing/sight-impaired households will have priority for five units designed for their needs.

Income and other restrictions apply. Applicants will be referred from the Housing Authority of the County of San Bernardino waitlist. Once qualified by the Housing Authority, applicants who are offered a unit will receive a Project-Based Voucher rental subsidy. Tenant rent will be up to 30 percent of the total household gross income as determined by the Housing Authority.

Applications are available for download at the Housing Authority of the County of San Bernardino website, http://ww2.hacsb.com/, or for pickup at any Housing Authority office.

Up-to-date information is available by calling 909-992-0931. Click here for more information about Loma Linda Veterans Village.

 

 

San Bernardino County Libraries host Baker’s Book Club

Join the San Bernardino County Library System, San Bernardino City Libraries, Colton City Library, Upland City Library, and the Redlands A.K. Smiley Library as we partner with Baker’s Drive-Thru to promote reading among children and teens throughout San Bernardino County. The Baker’s Book Club program is underway through Saturday, Nov. 17. This program encourages students to read in all communities across the county.

To participate in this program, visit any of the 32 San Bernardino County Branch Libraries, San Bernardino City Branch Libraries, Colton City Library, Upland City Library, or Redlands A.K. Smiley Library to sign up. Participants must be between the ages of 4 and 17, and a parent or guardian will need to sign to acknowledge reading accomplishments. A voucher for a free Baker’s food item will be issued as reading goals are met. Each child and teen may earn a total of three awards and vouchers for the duration of the program.

In support of the Countywide Vision’s Vision2Read literacy campaign, this program will help to improve literacy among children ages 4 to 17, with the help of incentives, by inspiring an excitement to read, providing achievement goals,  and encouraging a reading routine.

The San Bernardino County Library System is a dynamic network of 32 branch libraries that serve a diverse population over a vast geographic area. The County library system strives to provide equal access to information, technology, programs, and services for all people who call San Bernardino County home.

The library plays a key role in the achievement of the Countywide Vision, by contributing to educational, cultural, and historical development of our County community.

For more information on the San Bernardino County Library system, please visit http://www.sbclib.org/ or call (909) 387-2220.

Grand Jury wins statewide excellence in reporting award

The San Bernardino County Grand Jury’s 2016-17 report on the Apple Valley Unified School District Police Department has been recognized by the California Grand Jury Association as the best grand jury investigative report in the state.

The Grand Jury Reporting Award recognizes grand jury reports that bring matters of vital importance to public attention and lead to positive changes within their communities. Seven reports were nominated this year. In addition to evaluating the report’s quality – including clarity, thoroughness and substantiated facts – the Grand Jury Association considers agency responses and media coverage as measures of a report’s effectiveness.

The grand jury found that from January 2014 through December 2016, the Apple Valley Unified School District Police Department ordered more than 700 vehicles towed from public roadways. This number was proportionately higher than that in adjacent school districts during the same time period. All were towed by just one company. An examination of the issued citations revealed that most vehicles were not stopped for hazardous moving violations, but rather for equipment or registration violations that were outside of the department’s authority. During the same period, there was a decline in student-related interactions and on-campus activity by the police.

After the grand jury began its inquiry, the department changed is tow methodology to involve additional companies. The grand jury recommended that illegally obtained funds be returned, restitution be made where appropriate, owners be notified of their rights when subject to tow, the limits of the police authority be made clear and police duties and responsibilities be prioritized.

“The background was particularly thorough – written well, carefully attributed,” one reviewer stated. “The narrative was presented engagingly. Clearly the investigation’s findings resonated … because several policies and procedures were changed. The report also received extensive media coverage, further bringing to light the workings of a local government entity.”

The award was presented on Oct. 1 at the 37th California Grand Jury Association annual conference. Grand Jury Assistant Norma Grosjean, Superior Court administrator Sharon Bragg and 2016-17 grand jury member Ron Zurek accepted the award on behalf of the grand jury.

National emergency alert testing tomorrow, Oct. 3

Tomorrow, Oct. 3, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in coordination with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) plans to conduct the fourth nationwide test of the Emergency Alert System (EAS) and the Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA).

The WEA portion of the test is scheduled to commence at 11:18 a.m. Cell phones that are switched on and within range of an active cell tower should be capable of receiving the test message. Cell phones should only receive the message once.

The EAS portion of the test is scheduled to commence at 11:20 a.m. and will involve broadcast radio and television stations, cable television, and satellite radio and television services.

The test may look like regular, local EAS tests that are familiar to most people, but there will be some differences in what viewers will see and hear. During the test the public will hear a message indicating “this is a test.” The audio message will be the same for radio, television and cable. With this test, television viewers will see the EAS message scrolling across their television screens, however,the printed message may not include the words “this is a test”. If you see the message without the words “this is a test” please do not call 911 as this is only a test. If you have an actual emergency, then call 911. Regular programming will resume at the conclusion of the test.

More information and links to both FEMA and the FCC’s information pages are available at the San Bernardino County Fire website here. This site also provides information on how to prepare for and stay informed about what to do in the event of an actual emergency. That information can also be found here.

Please remember, this is ONLY a test and not an actual emergency.

Project Connect event offers services to the homeless

Homeless and low-income individuals and families can access a variety of supportive services and information during the Project Connect outreach event on Wednesday, Oct. 3, hosted by the San Bernardino County Homeless Partnership and collaborative partners.

The event will provide free medical screenings, legal services, employment services, housing support services, child care information and services, senior services and more.  Additional information regarding other county services and resources will be available.

“The homeless and those at-risk of becoming homeless often lack transportation and access to mainstream services,” said County Office of Homeless Services Chief Tom Hernandez.  “This is what makes the Project Connect event, and other events that bring together providers and those seeking services to one location, so vital to these individuals and the community.”

Project Connect will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 3, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at New Beginnings, Downtown Campus (formerly St. Paul’s United Methodist Church), located at 785 N. Arrowhead Ave. in San Bernardino.

Project Connect outreach events are held periodically throughout San Bernardino County to provide a centralized service delivery location where non-profit medical and social services providers can collaborate to best serve those in need.

For additional information on this or subsequent Project Connect outreach events, contact Deanna Luttrell at (909) 386-8225 or 7-1-1 for TTY users.

The San Bernardino County Homeless Partnership works to develop countywide public and private partnerships and to coordinate services and resources to end homelessness in San Bernardino County. SBCHP is helping to achieve the Countywide Vision by working to create a sustainable system of community health, public safety, and housing. Information on the Countywide Vision, the San Bernardino County Homeless Partnership and the Community Development and Housing Agency can be found at www.sbcounty.gov.

Free workshops on housing rights and responsibilities

The Inland Fair Housing and Mediation Board will conduct a series of workshops on housing rights and responsibilities throughout the month of October at various locations throughout San Bernardino and Riverside counties.

Each workshop will cover federal and state fair housing laws, how to recognize and report discrimination, the protections provided for individuals living with disabilities or families with children, new HUD guidelines on tenants with criminal backgrounds, evictions, deposits, habitability problems, notices and much more.

Workshops in San Bernardino County will include Oct. 9 in Apple Valley, Oct. 10 in Fontana, Oct. 15 in Joshua Tree, Oct. 16 in Needles, Oct. 17 in Victorville, and Oct. 25 in Rancho Cucamonga. Click here for a complete schedule with times and locations in English and Spanish.

To attend, register online here, call 1-800-321-0911, extension 150, or email mmontes@ifhmb.com.

 

 

 

Live sheep shearing and yarn spinning on display

Live sheep shearing and yarn spinning – how wool clothing gets made – has changed little over the centuries and will be on full display at Sheep to Shawl at the San Bernardino County Museum on Saturday, Sept. 29, from noon to 4 p.m.

To make a piece of natural fiber clothing artisans start with the plant or animal to furnish the material from which it is made: a sheep, goat, rabbit, llama, or plant fibers. Natural textiles are based on these fibers, whether fleece, fur, hair, or plant. During Sheep to Shawl, Museum visitors will be able to meet fur and fleece-bearing animals thanks to the University of California Cooperative Extension 4-H club members and Southern California Sheep/Wool.  Members of the local 4-H program will demonstrate how a live sheep is sheared (1 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.) and how the wool is cleaned by removing twigs and less savory bits of debris. Volunteers from local textile groups, and skilled artisans will demonstrate carding wool so the fibers lay straight, spinning them into thread, and weaving the threads into cloth.

Hands-on opportunities to touch fleeces, spin, design, and weave bracelets and potholders will be offered along with demonstrations of spinning and weaving by the Southern California Handweavers Guild and the Crosstwisters lacemaking group.  At 1:30 p.m. youth from the 4-H program will hold a wool fashion show.

Visitors can also walk through the museum’s ethnobotany and native plant gardens to see sources of plant fibers used by Native Americans. Activities are suitable for all ages.

Curator of Education Carolina Zataray said, “this process of construction exists in nearly every article of winter-based clothing we wear, yet most of our visitors know very little of how their sweater or coat was made. We’re excited to work with these partners to show off the skills necessary to go from sheep to shawl.”

Sheep to Shawl and the Museum’s other exciting programs and exhibits reflect the effort by the Board of Supervisors to achieve the Countywide Vision by celebrating arts, culture, and education in the county, creating quality of life for residents and visitors.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at 2024 Orange Tree Lane, at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $10 (adult), $8 (military or senior), $7 (student), and $5 (child aged 5 to 12). Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. Parking is free. For more information, visit www.sbcounty.gov/museum. The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities.

A celebration of life & resiliency for Las Vegas tragedy survivors

The San Bernardino County District Attorney’s Bureau of Victim Services will host two forums next week for victims of last year’s Route 91 Harvest Festival tragedy.

The forums will include a group discussion facilitated by licensed clinical therapists, one-on-one counseling, educational resources, help in navigating one’s own health care services, and assistance with applying for the State of Nevada and California Victim Compensation programs. Services will be provided by the San Bernardino County District Attorney’s Bureau of Victim Services, the San Bernardino County Department of Behavioral Health and The Counseling Team International.

All Services are provided free of charge. No insurance is needed.

The forums will be held from 5 to 9 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 10 in Victorville and on Thursday, Oct. 11 in Ontario. Click here for locations and more details.

For more information, please call the Bureau of Victim Services at (909) 382-3846.

 

 

County wins 5 awards from California State Association of Counties

Innovative programs that improve food safety, develop job prospects for high school students and streamline the way the County’s roads are maintained are among five programs recognized with prestigious Merit Awards by the California State Association of Counties (CSAC).

“These well-deserved awards illustrate the great work being done by County employees putting the public’s hard-earned tax dollars to work improving life in San Bernardino County,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Robert A. Lovingood. “These five programs are examples of how the County is working hard and working smart to create a community where residents and investors can prosper and achieve well-being.”

Each year, CSAC honors best practices in county governments in California. This year, CSAC received 275 entries from counties throughout California. The County of San Bernardino won four CSAC awards in 2017, four in 2016, three in 2015 and 2014, five in 2013, three in 2012, two in 2011 and one in 2010.

The County has won more than 300 state and national awards for innovative and cost-saving programs since 2010, including 42 awards from the National Association of Counties in May.

In CSAC’s Government Finance, Administration and Technology category, County departments won three Merit Awards.

  • The Environmental Health Services Division won for the Elevated Risk Plan program which improved food handling practices at food facilities that had a higher risk of causing food-borne illnesses and helped operators learn to achieve long-term compliance.
  • The County’s Workforce Development Department won for the Generation Go! Work-Based Learning Program which helped 14 high school students complete their medical assistant certification work experience hours at Arrowhead Regional Medical Center in May 2018. The program also prepared 452 students to complete a job readiness class in summer 2018 in order to go on to enroll in a credit-earning work experience course at a community college.
  • The Fleet Management Department won for the In-House Vehicle Title, Registration and Plates program which eliminated delays in obtaining registration, title and license plates from the Department of Motor Vehicles. The County is responsible for more than 6,000 vehicles and pieces of equipment ranging from golf carts to earth movers. Fleet Management staff learned they could become internal DMV registrars with training through the DMV Business Partner Automation Program. San Bernardino County is the first governmental DMV Business Partner in California.

In the Health And Human Services category, the Department of Behavioral Health won a Merit Award for its Video Interpretation program. Behavioral Health partnered with the Health Care Interpreter Network to pilot the use of a real-time video interpretation system which provides an immediate translator of a broad spectrum of languages including American Sign Language in order to improve access to care and services.

In the Housing, Land Use and Infrastructure category, San Bernardino County Department of Public Works won a Merit Award for its Performance Based Pavement Preservation program which improved the way the County maintains more than 2,175 miles of paved roads. The Department of Public Works categorizes its roads, confines projects to remain within a geographical zone and conducts preventative maintenance prior to critical points before road repair costs escalate.

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