Mental Health Services Act

In November 2004, California voters passed Proposition 63, which imposed a 1% tax on adjusted annual income over $1,000,000 to adopt the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) (effective January 1, 2005). According to the MHSA, the intent of the funding is “to reduce the long-term adverse impact on individuals, families and state and local budgets resulting from untreated serious mental illness…” In addition, local mental health delivery systems have been charged to “create a state-of-the-art, culturally competent system that promotes recovery/wellness for adults and older adults with serious mental illness and resilience for children and youth with serious emotional disorders and their families.” The MHSA identifies five (5) primary program components for funding that are locally developed via a Community Program Planning (CPP) process that is now integrated into a Three-Year Program and Expenditures Plan (Plan). An update to the Plan is required on an annual basis. The components include:

 

Since its inception in 2005, MHSA funded programs have provided enhancements to the public behavioral health system of care that promote wellness, recovery, and resilience and include the values of cultural competency, community-based collaboration, and meaningful inclusion of clients and family members in all aspects of behavioral health planning and services. 2015 marked the development and implementation of the MHSA Three-Year Integrated Plan, allowing the department the opportunity to focus on a cohesive system of behavioral health services and care.

The Annual update is the opportunity for the Department to highlight the accomplishments of the previous fiscal year, engage the community in stakeholder-informed decisions, and update the current fiscal year Three-Year Integrated Plan.

To get more information regarding the Mental Health Services Act (Proposition 63), view the MHSA law as amended in 2012 or visit the MHSA webpage on California Department of Mental Health website.