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Administrator

Supervisor Joe Baca, Jr. Hosting SheRoes of the 5th District

In recognition of Women’s History Month, San Bernardino County Fifth District Supervisor Joe Baca, Jr. will honor phenomenal unsung women from his district at the upcoming virtual event “SheRoes of the Fifth District” on March 18 at 6 p.m.

The women were selected from throughout the community for their accomplishments in their respective fields and for their dedication to improving the lives of others. The recipients are:

  • Farah Mohamed of Rialto, founder of Smile America Abdi Foundation
  • Kenesha Boyd of San Bernardino, co-founder of the VRP
  • Joyce Washington of Fontana, retiree and community leader
  • Amanda Maldonado-Arroyo of San Bernardino, branch manager at Wells Fargo and community activist
  • Angela McClain of Bloomington, founder of The Olive Branch Development & Empowerment Services
  • Nellie Cortez of Colton, retiree and long-time community activist

“The women who were selected for this recognition are selfless community advocates who inspire us every day and work tirelessly to improve the lives of those in our community. It is an honor to recognize them for their commitment and leadership,” Supervisor Baca said.

This event will be broadcast via Facebook Live @supervisorbacajr and YouTube Live at https://tinyurl.com/bacajr. Please visit https://fb.me/e/CwhJG3aL to RSVP. For more information, please call Supervisor Baca’s office at (909) 387-4565.

The Fifth District includes the cities of Colton, Fontana, Rialto, and San Bernardino, and the unincorporated communities of Arrowhead Farms, Bloomington, Devore, El Rancho Verde, Little Third, Rosena Ranch, and Muscoy.

State’s first case of P.1 coronavirus variant appears in San Bernardino

A San Bernardino resident is the first California case of the P.1 “Brazilian” variant of the novel coronavirus. County health officials urge residents to be as vigilant as ever about wearing masks, social distancing, avoiding contact with people outside of their households, and getting tested often to prevent the transmissions of all variants, along with getting vaccinated as soon as they are eligible.

The California Department of Public Health alerted the county to the case on March 13 after it was detected in a positive test sample collected on March 2.  The variant was detected by Fulgent Genetics (FLGT) using Fulgent’s next-generation sequencing-based COVID-19 test. County contact tracers have been in contact with the resident, a man in his 40s, since March 3. He reported experiencing symptoms and that he is self-isolating at home. County health officials are continuing to investigate how the resident might have been exposed to the variant. He has not been vaccinated.

“We are taking immediate and aggressive action to contact trace and contain the virus and working with the CDPH in expanding whole genomic sequencing to identify more cases,” said County Health Officer Dr. Michael S. Sequeira. “Slowing the spread of the disease and minimizing the spread of all variants is doable with contact tracing, strategic quarantine with masking and social distancing, and most importantly vaccination.”

The P.1 variant, discovered in Brazil in January, is believed to be more contagious than the most-common strain of the virus. There is no evidence yet that the variant leads to harsher cases of COVID-19. It is not yet clear whether the variant is more resistant to vaccines.

“The Johnson & Johnson vaccine was tested in Brazil, where it showed 0% mortality and 85% success in preventing hospitalizations and severe infections,” Sequeira said.

Safe practices are more important than ever now that the State has moved the county from the highly restrictive purple tier of the State Blueprint for a Safer Economy to the less-restrictive red tier. The county’s key coronavirus metrics are moving quickly toward qualifying the county for even more-lenient orange tier.

“If we can contain this and continue vaccinating, we will continue to move forward,” Dr. Sequeira said. “If we complete the vaccination effort, at maximum pace and urgency, we will contain and virtually eliminate this and other variants.”

Board approves Starlink test to explore satellite internet

Starlink and San Bernardino County were seemingly made for each other.

The low-flying satellite constellation that will one day cover the globe, a product of engineer and entrepreneur Elon Musk’s SpaceX, was designed to provide fast, reliable internet connectivity to underserved areas of the planet. Places far away from the closest landline, Wi-Fi, and cellular services many people in urban and suburban areas take for granted. Places like some of the most remote areas of San Bernardino County.

That’s why the Board of Supervisors today approved an agreement with Starlink to test a beta version of Starlink. If the test goes well, the county could begin using Starlink to provide connectivity to remote Sheriff’s deputies and other county personnel serving the public in remote areas.

“Starlink holds the promise of making high-speed internet available to students, home businesses, seniors, and other county residents who have never imagined service could be possible in their communities,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman, a constant and consistent champion for identifying and employing cutting-edge technology to improve government services.

Much larger than all of Switzerland as well as nine U.S. states, at 20,105 square miles San Bernardino County is by far the largest county in the country (Alaska has four that are larger, but they’re called “boroughs”). As a result, many small desert communities are an hour’s drive away or further from their nearest neighbor, and considerably out or range for most technologies.

Connecting these communities to information from the world around them has long been a priority for the county. For instance, there are places in San Bernardino County that can’t be reached by television signals beamed from Los Angeles. For decades, the county has operated mountain-top relay stations to grab those faraway TV signals and throw them across sparsely populated desert valleys.

Starlink is a constellation of small satellites in low Earth orbit that work in combination with ground receivers.  Because Starlink satellites are closer to Earth than traditional satellites, signals get to their destinations more quickly than those from other higher-flying satellite internet services.  Starlink is offering beta testing of this satellite-based internet service while it continues a planned expansion to achieve near-global coverage in 2021.

If the county’s beta test is successful, the county would be uniquely positioned to take advantage of this service for the many remote and infrastructure-challenged areas throughout the county.

“The county has a duty to those we serve to think outside of the box and not do things just because that’s the way we’ve always done them,” Hagman said. “By applying new technologies we can maximize the quality and efficiency of our serves and improve the lives of our residents.”

San Bernardino County to become first Southern California Topgolf location

The Board of Supervisors has placed San Bernardino County at the top of the leaderboard toward becoming the first Southern California home of Topgolf, an internationally renowned technology-enabled entertainment experience.

“Topgolf will be an outstanding entertainment asset that will attract people from all over Southern California to San Bernardino County,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman, whose Fourth District includes the future Topgolf site on county-owned land in Ontario. “The Topgolf concept appeals to all ages, and everyone will benefit from the revenue that will be directed toward the betterment of the county’s Regional Parks system.”

The county and Topgolf, a hugely popular sports and entertainment attraction with locations around the globe, entered into a 20-year lease agreement in 2019. Delayed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the deal is now set to go forward with construction activities beginning this month and completion anticipated for early 2022. The development is on 13.7 acres of undeveloped county-owned land adjacent to Cucamonga-Guasti Regional Park at the corner of Archibald Avenue and Fourth Street in the City of Ontario.

The agreement will bring in more than $625,000 a year to support the county’s system of regional parks.

Topgolf plans to build a nearly 600,000-square foot facility at the county site, which will be similar in size and scope to other multi-level Topgolf venues. The new location will feature 102 hitting bays on three floors, plus a full-service restaurant and bar and event space for corporate and social events.  The venue also plans to incorporate a mini-golf component at a later date for all to enjoy.

In addition to the jobs that will be created during construction, Topgolf will hire more than 400 employees once the venue is completed and operational.

Chairman Hagman came up with the idea of using the land for a golf-related attraction and shared that with the County Real Estate Services Department, which approached Topgolf.

“The County Real Estate Services Department deserves a lot of praise and credit for reaching out to Topgolf with the idea of making county-owned land the company’s first Southern California location,” Chairman Hagman said.

“Topgolf chose the County of San Bernardino due to its convenient regional location to the Inland Empire, strong retail performance, and large and growing population base,” said Chris Callaway, Chief Development Officer with Topgolf.  “Being positioned just north of I-10 and west of I-15 enables our Topgolf venue to connect with and entertain many communities and businesses throughout the region.”

“San Bernardino County has been great to work with and has been very business-friendly. Throughout the deal process, they solved issues as we progressed in finalizing the transaction, and we look forward to continuing our strong partnership together,” Callaway added.

The Topgolf concept is built on a foundation of community, inclusivity and fun, and is truly a game for everyone.  The technology-driven experience is centered on guests hitting patented, microchipped golf balls into targets on the outfield while playing classic Topgolf games. Guests can also enjoy a chef-driven food and beverage menu in their outdoor hitting bays while safely enjoying the outdoor fun. What started as a simple idea to enhance the game of golf has now evolved into a best-in-class hospitality entertainment venue centered on a game that is accessible and appealing to all, regardless of skill or ability. The dynamic atmosphere, engaging staff, and innovative games combine to provide a truly unique experience.

Over the course of the initial 20-year ground lease, once construction is completed and Topgolf is open for business, the county will receive more than $625,000 in annual revenue, benefiting the San Bernardino County Regional Parks system, https://parks.sbcounty.gov/, which includes nine regional parks throughout the county and several other recreational attractions.

The County Real Estate Services Department first approached Topgolf more than four years ago. Given the location of the land coupled with the socio-economic demographics of the area and recreational use restrictions, the county believed that Topgolf was an ideal fit for the site and developed a strategy to attract the company.

Part of the county’s initial outreach strategy to Topgolf included the county retaining the services of JLL Retail Group in Ontario. On the county’s behalf, JLL made contact with Topgolf’s brokerage representatives from The Retail Connection out of Dallas, Texas. Those connections facilitated the county’s introduction to Topgolf, which led to initial discussions and negotiations for Topgolf to lease the land from the county. This strategic initiative by the county resulted in the ground lease deal with Topgolf that was approved by the Board of Supervisors on April 30, 2019.

 

January 6, 2021 Update

The County Update publishes once a week on Wednesdays and also as needed to share important news and resources in our battle against COVID-19. We remain here for you. #SBCountyTogether

In today’s Update:

  • New tool helps you know how long to quarantine
  • Vaccination roadmap update: County moves into Tier 2 of Phase 1A
  • Three weeks later: how are those first vaccinated doing?
  • County testing facilities keep expanded hours to handle demand
  • Sheriff COVID-19 cases update

County Introduces Coronavirus Quarantine and Isolation Calculator

San Bernardino County has added a new enhancement to its COVID-19 website: a Quarantine and Isolation Calculator that enables people to determine how long they should self-isolate after testing positive for the disease, being sick with COVID-19, or being exposed to someone with COVID-19.

By using this convenient tool, anyone can determine the date when his or her isolation may end after entering the date when either 1) symptoms first manifested; 2) a specimen was collected (i.e., a test was conducted); or 3) the person was potentially exposed to the disease.

The tool offers four different calculation options:

  • For those who have tested positive and have symptoms of COVID-19;
  • For those who have tested positive but manifest no symptoms of the disease;
  • For those who have been in close contact with an infected individual but show no symptoms;
  • For those who previously tested positive (by calculating their susceptibility to reinfection).

“This is a simple, easy-to-use tool that will give people confidence in their efforts to protect others,” said County Director of Public Health, Corwin Porter. “It will allow them to determine exactly how long they need to isolate to ensure they don’t spread the disease to family, friends, colleagues or anyone else.”

County Moves into Tier 2 of Phase 1A

This week, the County of San Bernardino is moving into the second tier of Phase 1A of its vaccination roadmap, which means doses are being distributed to caregivers with In Home Support Services (IHSS), intermediate care centers, and public and community health centers, including facilities for mental health.

Tier 2 of Phase 1A also sees the first vaccines going to urgent care facilities and primary care physicians that are able to receive and handle the vaccines, which is less than 25% of all state physicians at this time.

The County has been very successful in its distribution of the vaccine to frontline health care workers and medical first responders that are in Tier 1 of Phase 1A. To date, nearly 25,000 doses have gone to our hospital workers; approximately 600 to dialysis centers; and just under 900 doses to medical first responders (paramedics and EMTs).

Finishing out Tier 1, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) is coordinating the distribution of vaccines to staff at skilled nursing and assisted living facilities through partnerships with Walgreens and CVS.

To learn more about the vaccine roadmap and to read Frequently Asked Questions, visit the County’s vaccine webpage.

County’s First Vaccine Recipients Share Thoughts on Side Effects

First Responders urge others to get shots when available

The first local recipients of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine — all of whom are high-risk health care workers at  Arrowhead Regional Medical Center (ARMC) — are delivering a consistent message to County residents: adverse reactions from the medicine are minimal , and virtually everyone should take advantage of the vaccine when given the opportunity.

“I feel great, with absolutely no side effects,” said Dr. Carol Lee, program director for the Department of Emergency Medicine’s residency program. “I found it less painful than the routine flu vaccination I get every year,” she added.

Dr. Lee says her experience is common. “I’ve spoken to a lot of people about the vaccinations and I personally don’t know anyone who has suffered severe side effects — or any type of side effect, for that matter. Millions of doses have been given worldwide, and the incidence of side effects is extremely low,” she noted.

Dr. Danny Fernandez, an emergency room physician in his second year of residency, had a similar experience.

“I feel as fine as I did before [getting the shot],” he said. “This is similar to other vaccines we take, and [getting vaccinated] is an easy process — not something to be feared,” said Dr. Fernandez, who considered it “an honor to be among the first recipients” of the vaccine.

Several of the doctors who first received the vaccine share their observations in this video.

Dr. Eman Ahmad, a family practice physician who specializes in geriatrics (the area of medicine focusing on the elderly) experienced some slight tenderness at the injection site on her arm but otherwise suffered no side effects.

“I’ve never had any adverse reactions from any of the vaccines I’ve received,” she said, and claimed the shot was comparable to the flu vaccine, though “perhaps with fewer symptoms.” She is encouraging everyone who doesn’t have specific contraindications (e.g., history of severe allergic reactions) to get the vaccine.

“We need to save as many lives as possible,” she said. “If we are able to vaccinate as many people in the community as possible … we’ll have immunity and help decrease the spread of the virus, [while reducing] mortality and morbidity.”

Dr. Nidal Rafeedi, who has been treating patients for more than two decades, is currently assistant director of respiratory care. Dr. Rafeedi, who “considers himself fortunate” to be one of the first to be vaccinated, has also avoided side effects from the vaccination.

“I feel fantastic. I’ve had no effects at all, other than a little soreness — just like I normally get from a flu shot. I’m sleeping well and have had no fever.”

Dr. Rafeedi was diagnosed with leukemia as a child, and as a result underwent radiation and chemotherapy. That experience, he said, has led him to “trust medicine” — and he urged others to do so as well.

“[The vaccine] is something that will end the pandemic, so I’m asking the community to trust medicine, and to trust science. Let’s end this so that we can celebrate together with a great summer.”

All of the doctors agreed that residents should continue following the preventative measures health experts have promoted the past several months: avoid unnecessary contact with individuals outside your household. Maintain social distancing. Wear a mask when in the vicinity of others. And wash your hands thoroughly and regularly.

And all agreed with Dr. Lee, who said County residents should not hesitate when offered the medication: “So please: go get vaccinated when it’s your turn.”

Testing Facilities Expanded Hours

County testing facilities are expanding their hours to accommodate an increased demand for testing. Some County locations will be open as late as 8 p.m. and on Saturdays. A list of testing sites and extended hours can be found here.

“Getting tested is both painless and cost free,” said County Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman, “and for those with an appointment, it’s quick, easy and convenient. So please, schedule an appointment at your earliest convenience.”

Sheriff Update on Inmates and Employees Testing Positive for COVID-19

A total of 803 County jail inmates have tested positive for COVID-19. Many of the inmates are only experiencing minor symptoms of the virus. The infected inmates are in isolation, being monitored around the clock, and are being provided with medical treatment. A total of 723 inmates have recovered from the illness.

A total of 811 department employees have tested positive for COVID-19 and are self-isolating at home; 674 employees have recovered from the virus. Other employees are expected to return to work in the next few weeks. It is unknown when or where the employees were infected with the virus. The department continues to encourage all department members to heed the warnings of health officials.

Latest Stats

214,813 Confirmed Cases             (up 0.7% from the previous day)

1,454 Deaths                                    (up 0.3% from the previous day)

1,756,012 Tests                               (up 0.3% from the previous day)

Current Southern California ICU Capacity: 0% (Goal to lift State Stay-at-Home Order: 15%)

For more statistics from the COVID-19 Surveillance Dashboard, click the desktop or mobile tab on the County’s sbcovid19.com website.

For all COVID-19 related information, including case statistics, FAQs, guidelines and resources, visit the County’s COVID-19 webpage at http://sbcovid19.com/.  Residents of San Bernardino County may also call the COVID-19 helpline at (909) 387-3911 for general information and resources about the virus. The phone line is NOT for medical calls and is available Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. If you have questions about social services, please call 211.

La Actualización del Condado se publica una vez a la semana los miércoles, y también según sea necesario, con el fin de compartir noticias y recursos importantes en nuestra batalla contra COVID-19. Nos quedamos aquí para ti. #SBCountyTogether

Para las estadísticas más recientes y enlaces importantes, desplácese hasta la parte inferior de la actualización de hoy.

En la actualización de hoy:

  • La nueva herramienta le ayuda a determinar el tiempo o fecha en que su cuarentena y aislamiento puede terminar.
  • Actualización de la asignación de vacunas: El condado pasa al nivel 2 de la Fase 1A
  • Tres semanas después: ¿Cómo están los primeros vacunados?
  • Los Sitios de pruebas del condado continúan ampliando sus horas para satisfacer una mayor demanda de pruebas.
  • Actualización de casos de COVID-19 del Sheriff

El Condado introduce la calculadora de cuarentena y aislamiento de coronavirus

El Condado de San Bernardino ha añadido a su sitio web de COVID-19 una calculadora de cuarentena y aislamiento: Quarantine and Isolation Calculator que permite a las personas puedan determinar cuánto tiempo deben auto-aislar después de tener una prueba positiva de Covid19, estar enfermo con COVID-19, o estar expuesto a alguien con COVID-19.

Usando esta herramienta conveniente, cualquier persona puede determinar la fecha en que su aislamiento puede terminar después de ingresar la fecha en la que 1) los síntomas se manifestaron por primera vez; 2) se recolectó una muestra (es decir, se realizó una prueba); o 3) la persona estuvo potencialmente expuesta a la enfermedad.

La herramienta ofrece cuatro opciones diferentes para calcular:

  • Para aquellos que han resultado positivos y tienen síntomas de COVID-19
  • Para aquellos que han resultado positivos pero no manifiestan síntomas de la enfermedad.
  • Para aquellos que han estado en contacto cercano con un individuo infectado pero no muestran síntomas;
  • Para aquellos que previamente han resultado positivos (calculando su susceptibilidad a la reinfección).

“Esta es una herramienta simple y fácil de usar que le dará a la gente confianza en sus esfuerzos para proteger a los demás”, dijo El Director de Salud Pública del Condado, Corwin Porter. “Les permitirá determinar exactamente cuánto tiempo necesitan aislar para asegurarse de que no transmiten la enfermedad a familiares, amigos, colegas o cualquier otra persona”.

El condado se mueve al nivel 2 de la fase 1A

Esta semana, el Condado de San Bernardino está pasando al segundo nivel de la fase 1A de la vacunación, lo que significa que las dosis se están distribuyendo a los cuidadores con los Servicios de Apoyo el Hogar (IHSS), centros de atención intermedia, y centros de salud públicos y comunitarios, incluyendo instalaciones para la salud mental.

El nivel 2 de la Fase 1A también anticipa que las primeras vacunas serán repartidas a centros de atención urgente y médicos de atención primaria que son capaces de recibir y manejar las vacunas, que es menos del 25% de todos los médicos estatales en este momento.

El Condado ha tenido mucho éxito en su distribución de la vacuna a los trabajadores de atención médica de primera línea y a los primeros respondedores médicos que están en el nivel 1 de la fase 1A. Hasta la fecha, casi 25,000 dosis han ido a nuestros trabajadores hospitalarios; aproximadamente 600 a los centros de diálisis; y poco menos de 900 dosis a los primeros intervinientes médicos (paramédicos y EMT).

Finalizando el nivel 1, el Centro para el Control de Enfermedades (CDC) está coordinando la distribución de vacunas al personal de enfermería especializada y centros de vida asistida a través de asociaciones con Walgreens y CVS.

Para obtener más información sobre las fases de asignación de la vacuna y para leer las preguntas más frecuentes, visite la página web de vacunas del condado  visit the County’s vaccine webpage..

Los primeros recipientes de la vacuna en condado comparten sus pensamientos sobre los efectos secundarios

Los Primeros Respondedores urgen a otros a recibir vacunas cuando estén disponibles


Los primeros recipientes locales de la vacuna Pfizer-BioNTech —todos son trabajadores de salud de alto riesgo en Arrowhead Regional Medical Center (ARMC)  (ARMC)— están enviando un mensaje consistente a los residentes del condado: las reacciones adversas del medicamento son mínimas y prácticamente todos deben aprovechar la vacuna cuando se les da la oportunidad.

“Me siento muy bien, sin absolutamente ningún efecto secundario”, dijo la Dra. Carol Lee, directora del programa del programa de residencia del Departamento de Medicina de Emergencia. “Me pareció menos doloroso que la vacunación antigripal de rutina que recibo cada año”, agregó.

La Dra. Lee dice que su experiencia es común. “He hablado con mucha gente sobre las vacunas y personalmente no conozco a nadie que haya sufrido efectos secundarios graves, o cualquier tipo de efecto secundario, por lo demás. Se han administrado millones de dosis en todo el mundo, y la incidencia de efectos secundarios es extremadamente baja”, señaló.

El Dr. Danny Fernandez, un médico de la sala de emergencias en su segundo año de residencia, tuvo una experiencia similar.

“Me siento tan bien como antes de [recibir la vacuna]”, dijo. “Esto es similar a otras vacunas que tomamos, y [vacunarse] es un proceso fácil, no algo que hay que temer”, dijo el Dr. Fernández, quien consideró que era “un honor estar entre los primeros recipientes” de la vacuna.

Varios de los médicos que recibieron la vacuna por primera vez comparten sus observaciones en este video.

La Dra. Eman Ahmad, una médica de práctica de la familia que se especializa en la geriatría (el área de medicina que se concentra en los ancianos) experimentó un poco de sensibilidad en el sitio de la inyección en su brazo, pero de otro modo no sufrió efectos secundarios.

“Nunca he tenido ninguna reacción adversa de ninguna de las vacunas que he recibido”, dijo, y afirmó que la inyección era comparable a la vacuna contra la gripe, aunque “quizás con menos síntomas”. Está animando a todas las personas que no tienen contraindicaciones específicas (por ejemplo, antecedentes de reacciones alérgicas graves)  que se vacunen.

“Necesitamos salvar tantas vidas como sea posible”, dijo. “Si somos capaces de vacunar a tantas personas en la comunidad como sea posible … tendremos inmunidad y ayudaremos a disminuir la propagación del virus, [mientras se reduce] la mortalidad y la morbilidad”.

El Dr. Nidal Rafeedi, que ha estado tratando a los pacientes durante más de dos décadas, es el subdirector de atención respiratoria. El Dr. Rafeedi, que “se considera afortunado” de ser uno de los primeros en vacunarse, también ha evitado los efectos secundarios de la vacunación.

“Me siento fantástico. No he tenido ningún efecto, aparte de un poco de dolor, al igual que normalmente me da una vacuna contra la gripe. Estoy durmiendo bien y no he tenido fiebre”.

El Dr. Rafeedi fue diagnosticado con leucemia cuando era niño, y como resultado se sometió a radiación y quimioterapia. Esa experiencia, dijo, lo ha llevado a “confiar en la medicina”, e instó a otros a hacerlo también.

“[La vacuna] es algo que pondrá fin a la pandemia, así que le pido a la comunidad que confíe en la medicina y que confíe en la ciencia. Terminemos esto para que podamos celebrar juntos un gran verano”.

Todos los médicos estuvieron de acuerdo en que los residentes deben continuar siguiendo las medidas preventivas que los expertos en salud han promovido los últimos meses: evitar el contacto innecesario con personas fuera de su hogar. Mantener el distanciamiento social. Use una máscara cuando esté cerca de los demás. Y lávese bien las manos y regularmente.

Y todos estuvieron de acuerdo con el Dr. Lee, quien dijo que los residentes del Condado no deberían dudar cuando  el medicamento sea  ofrecido: “Así que por favor: Vaya a vacunarse cuando sea su turno”.

Sitios de pruebas amplían las horas

Los Sitios de pruebas del condado están ampliando sus horas para satisfacer una mayor demanda de pruebas. Algunas ubicaciones del condado estarán abiertas hasta las 8 p.m. y los sábados. Puede encontrar una lista de sitios de pruebas y horarios extendidos aquí.

“Hacerse la prueba no es doloroso y es gratuito”, dijo el Presidente de la Junta de supervisores del Condado, Curt Hagman, “y para aquellos con cita, es rápido, fácil y conveniente. Así que por favor, programe una cita tan pronto como le sea posible.”

Actualización del Sheriff sobre presos y empleados que han resultado positivos de COVID-19

Un total de 803 presos en las cárceles del condado han resultado positivos de COVID-19. Muchos de los presos sólo están experimentando síntomas menores del virus. Los presos infectados están aislados, siendo vigilados las 24 horas del día y reciben tratamiento médico. Un total de 723 presos se han recuperado de la enfermedad.

Un total de 811 empleados del departamento han resultado positivos de COVID-19 y se autoaislan en casa; 674 empleados se han recuperado del virus. Se espera que los otros empleados regresen a trabajar en las próximas semanas. No se sabe cuándo o dónde se infectaron los empleados con el virus. El departamento sigue alentando a todos los miembros del departamento a que presten atención a las advertencias de los funcionarios de salud.

Estadísticas más recientes

214,813 Casos Confirmados         (un 0.7% desde el día anterior)

1,454 Muertes                                 (un 0.3% desde el día anterior)

1,756,012 Pruebas                          (un 0.3% desde el día anterior)

Capacidad actual de las unidades de cuidados intensivos (UCI) del sur de California: 0 % (objetivo para levantar el pedido de permanencia en casa del estado: el 15 %)

Para obtener más estadísticas del Tablero de Vigilancia COVID-19, haga clic en la pestaña de escritorio o móvil en sbcovid19.com sitio web del Condado.

Para toda la información relacionada con COVID-19, incluyendo estadísticas de casos, preguntas frecuentes, pautas y recursos, visite la página web de COVID-19 del Condado en http://sbcovid19.com/.  Los residentes del Condado de San Bernardino también pueden llamar a la línea de ayuda COVID-19 al (909) 387-3911 para obtener información general y recursos sobre el virus. La línea telefónica NO es para llamadas médicas y está disponible de lunes a viernes, de 9 a.m.a 5 p.m. Si tiene preguntas sobre servicios sociales, llame al 211.

 

Board re-elects Hagman as Chair; appoints Rowe as Vice Chair

Supervisor Curt Hagman has been unanimously re-elected by his Board of Supervisors colleagues to serve a second two-year term as Board Chairman. The Board unanimously elected Supervisor Dawn Rowe to serve as Vice Chair. The appointments took effect immediately.

Chairman Curt Hagman

Citing Chairman Hagman’s able and accomplished leadership of the County during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the Board on Tuesday, Jan. 5, also unanimously waived for the first time a 50-year-old County policy precluding chairs from serving two consecutive terms.

“Our Chairman has done an exemplary job during COVID,” Vice Chair Rowe said in proposing the policy waiver. “During a pandemic is not the time to change leadership.”

Rowe pointed to Chairman Hagman’s long-standing relationships with international business groups, which have resulted in the county being able to secure shipments of personal protective equipment and other supplies for the county, cities, and local businesses.

Vice Chair Dawn Rowe

She also pointed to his development of the COVID-Compliant Business Partnership Program, which has provided cash grants to more than 5,000 county businesses, and the establishment of the Skilled Nursing Facility Task Force during his watch.

“The one thing you have to be very, very careful of when you’re in the middle of a crisis and you have a leader who is handling the situation and everything is well in hand is changing leadership unless you have a very good reason,” said First District Supervisor Paul Cook, a retired Marine Corps Colonel.

“Maintaining leadership will help keep our County on course as we continue working to protect public health and support our communities during the ongoing pandemic,” Second District Supervisor Janice Rutherford said. “Since she joined the Board in 2018, Supervisor Rowe has proven her mettle when it comes to dealing with the many challenges facing our County, and I have no doubt she will be an excellent Vice-Chair.”

“Chairman Hagman, during the short period of time I’ve gotten to know him on the Board, has done a great job,” said Fifth District Supervisor Joe Baca, Jr., who was elected in November and took office last month.

“I would like to thank my colleagues for their vote of confidence and we will keep working as a team with county employees and our residents to deal with what 2021 brings,” Chairman Hagman said. “Hopefully it’s not as eventful as 2020.”

The Board Chair presides over Board of Supervisors meetings, works with the County executive leadership to set the Board’s agenda, and acts as the Board’s executive agent and representative.

December 23, 2020 Update

The County Update publishes each Wednesday and also as needed, to share important news and resources in our battle against COVID-19 and to keep our economy running. We remain here for you. #SBCountyTogether

For latest COVID-19 statistics and important links, scroll to the bottom of today’s Update

In today’s Update:

  • County making progress delivering vaccines to all frontline health care workers
  • Getting help for your illness or injury during the pandemic
  • Public Health Officer shares video message on Moderna
  • Sheriff COVID-19 cases update

              Happy Holidays to the residents and businesses of San Bernardino County!

 County Making Steady Progress in Vaccinating Frontline Health Care Workers

San Bernardino County is progressing smoothly in its efforts to widely administer FDA-approved COVID-19 vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, with an initial focus on high-risk health workers treating patients on the front lines of the pandemic

This video shows just a small sampling of the many health care workers receiving the vaccines in medical centers throughout the county.

“We have already provided initial doses to literally thousands of health care workers throughout the county,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman. “Our top priority is getting the vaccines to doctors, nurses, paramedics, and our other heroes working in hospitals and emergency medical facilities. We expect virtually all of our 112,000 health care providers to receive their first doses within the next few weeks.”

Both vaccines require two doses, 21 days apart for the Pfizer vaccine and 28 days for Moderna, and both have shown to be at least 94% effective at preventing symptomatic cases.

“We are receiving additional supplies of the vaccines every week, and have established a sophisticated system to ensure doses are properly stored and distributed to our partners as quickly and as efficiently as possible,” said Hagman.

The following hospitals and medical centers are vaccinating frontline health care workers:

Arrowhead Regional Medical Center

Ballard Rehabilitation Hospital

Barstow Community Hospital

Bear Valley Medical Center

Canyon Ridge Hospital

Kindred Hospital (Ontario, Rancho)

Chino Valley Medical Center

Colorado River Medical Center

Community Hospital of San Bernardino

Desert Valley Hospital

Hi-Desert Medical Center

Kaiser Permanente (Fontana, Ontario)

Loma Linda Medical Center

Loma Linda University Behavioral Health Medical Center

Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital

Montclair Hospital Medical Center

Mountains Community Hospital

Patton State Hospital

Redlands Community Hospital

San Antonio Regional Hospital

St. Bernardine Medical Center

St. Mary Medical Center – Apple Valley

Totally Kids Rehabilitation Hospital

Victor Valley Global Medical Center

Getting Help for Your Illness or Injury during the Pandemic

With the coronavirus tightening its grip on the hospital and emergency medical systems, people are often left wondering how to best seek treatment when they become sick or injured. For many, all they know are ambulances and hospital emergency departments. However, those last-resort options represent but a fraction of the full health care system available to the public.

“San Bernardino is similar to other counties throughout the region in its approach to providing health care to its residents and visitors,” said Tom Marshall, Deputy Chief of the San Bernardino County Fire Protection District and Incident Commander of San Bernardino County All-Hazard Incident Management Team #1 (XBO IMT).  Primary care providers, physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants are the front line for life-long health care.

“These providers develop relationships with their patients through annual check-ups and management of chronic health conditions. They are also an excellent source for emerging illnesses or minor injuries,” Marshall said. Primary care providers represent the highest concentration of health care providers in the system.

When illnesses or injuries occur outside of normal business hours (or if a patient is traveling), urgent care facilities and health clinics are staffed and equipped to handle these same illnesses and often provide advanced care such as X-rays and wound treatment. While not as robust as the primary care system, the extended hours of urgent care facilities, many of which are open 24 hours a day, are a strong support network for the primary care providers. There are more urgent care beds and providers than emergency department beds in the region.

When your best choice is the ER

For patients with life-threatening illnesses or complex injuries, the emergency department is the destination of choice. This subset of patients can require the assistance of numerous health care workers. Treating one seriously ill or badly injured patient often involves multiple nurses and physicians.  Representing the smallest component of the health care system, the emergency department is often the first to be overwhelmed with patients who can treated elsewhere, resulting in wait times that can last several hours.

When the intensive care unit of a hospital is at capacity, the overflow goes to the emergency department (ED) due to the training and capabilities of the ED staff. This also creates a shortage of available beds in the ED. ICU patients held in the ED often require the dedication of an ED nurse who would otherwise be able to manage three patients at once. This lack of beds and staffing creates a backup in the system that cannot be undone as additional patients continue to arrive by ambulance and private vehicle.

Ambulances that arrive at an emergency department with no open beds are forced to wait. This decreases the number of ambulances available for additional 911 calls.

“Many agencies have a standard of arriving on scene of a 911 call in under 10 minutes,” said Nathan Cooke, deputy chief of the Chino Valley Fire District and Deputy Incident Commander of the XBO IMT. “However, the effects of a hospital system stretched to its limits creates a trickle-down effect that threatens the stability of the 911 emergency medical system.”

Consider alternative options

We can find the best care for ourselves and our loved ones by utilizing the full capacity of the health care system. Contact your primary medical provider or nurse advice line for routine medical concerns or to discuss your symptoms. If it’s an urgent situation such as the need for a prescription refill or a minor laceration that may need to be sutured, urgent cares stand ready to help.

Recently, paramedics and EMT’s in San Bernardino County who respond to 911 calls and determine that a patient is stable and not suffering from any life-threatening or life disabling event began educating and referring patients into these alternate avenues of the healthcare system.

“This has resulted in the mutual benefits of ensuring patients receive appropriate care for their current complaint, decreasing the workload of the emergency departments and keeping ambulances available for the critically ill and injured,” Chief Marshall said.

Calling 911 for advice is never appropriate nor shall call-takers provide advice during the call. Seeking ambulance transport to an emergency department for a COVID test or in hopes of receiving the COVID vaccine is likewise inappropriate and serves only to further stress a system that is at its limit.

No one wants to be sick, especially around the holiday season.  With the triple threat of colds, flu, and COVID-19, your safest actions remain frequent hand washing, sanitizing commonly touched surfaces, limiting contact with others to essential activities, and wearing a mask when social distancing cannot be maintained. We are all in this together. Help us help you.

For more information and current recommendations, please go to www.sbcovid19.gov.

The XBO IMT is an “All-Hazard” incident management team comprised of members from fire agencies throughout San Bernardino County along with the San Bernardino County Sheriff.  Tasked with providing on-scene incident management support during incidents or events that exceed a jurisdiction’s or agency’s capability or capacity, XBO IMT applies its knowledge and expertise to support large fires that extend beyond the initial attack phase, mass gathering events such as major sports events and concerts, and mass casualty incidents. Incident management teams provide the five functions of Command, Operations, Planning, Logistics and Finance and operate under a delegation of authority from the local jurisdiction.

County Public Health Officer Shares Importance of Moderna Vaccine

Dr. Michael Sequeira, public health officer for San Bernardino County, shared his personal views on the importance of the Moderna vaccine in this short video. He also gives some insights into the unique advantages of handling this vaccine.

Sheriff Update on Inmates and Employees Testing Positive for COVID-19

A total of 747 County jail inmates have tested positive for COVID-19. Many of the inmates are only experiencing minor symptoms of the virus. The infected inmates are in isolation, being monitored around the clock, and are being provided with medical treatment. A total of 651 inmates have recovered from the illness.

A total of 686 department employees have tested positive for COVID-19 and are self-isolating at home; 489 employees have recovered from the virus. Other employees are expected to return to work in the next few weeks. It is unknown when or where the employees were infected with the virus. The department continues to encourage all department members to heed the warnings of health officials.

Latest Stats

170,855 Confirmed Cases             (up 1.5% from the previous day)
1,407 Deaths                                     (up 1.4% from the previous day)
1,526,935 Tests                                (up 1.5% from the previous day)

Current Southern California ICU Capacity: 0% (Goal to lift State Stay-at-Home Order: 15%)

For more statistics from the COVID-19 Surveillance Dashboard, click the desktop or mobile tab on the County’s sbcovid19.com website.

For all COVID-19 related information, including case statistics, FAQs, guidelines and resources, visit the County’s COVID-19 webpage at http://sbcovid19.com/.  Residents of San Bernardino County may also call the COVID-19 helpline at (909) 387-3911 for general information and resources about the virus. The phone line is NOT for medical calls and is available Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. If you have questions about social services, please call 211.

Actualización del 23 de diciembre de 2020

La Actualización del Condado se publica una vez a la semana los miércoles, y también según sea necesario, con el fin de compartir noticias y recursos importantes en nuestra batalla contra COVID-19. Nos quedamos aquí para ti. #SBCountyTogether

Para las estadísticas más recientes y enlaces importantes, desplácese hasta la parte inferior de la actualización de hoy.

En la actualización de hoy:

  • El condado progresa en la administración de vacunas a todos los trabajadores de la salud de primera línea
  • Obtener ayuda para su enfermedad o lesión durante la pandemia
  • Oficial de Salud Pública comparte video mensaje en Moderna
  • Actualización de casos del Sheriff COVID-19

¡Felices fiestas a los residentes y negocios del condado de San Bernardino!

                                                                         

El Condado haciendo progresos constantes en la vacunación de los trabajadores de atención médica de primera línea

El condado de San Bernardino está progresando sin problemas en sus esfuerzos por administrar ampliamente las vacunas COVID-19 aprobadas por la FDA de Pfizer-BioNTech y Moderna, con un enfoque inicial en los trabajadores de salud de alto riesgo que tratan a los pacientes en la primera línea de la pandemia.

Este video muestra sólo una pequeña muestra de los muchos trabajadores de la salud que reciben las vacunas en centros médicos en todo el condado.

“Ya hemos proporcionado dosis iniciales a literalmente miles de trabajadores de la salud en todo el condado”, dijo el presidente de la Junta de Supervisores, Curt Hagman. “Nuestra máxima prioridad es llevar las vacunas a médicos, enfermeras, paramédicos y a nuestros otros héroes que trabajan en hospitales e instalaciones médicas de emergencia. Esperamos que prácticamente todos nuestros 112.000 proveedores de atención médica reciban sus primeras dosis en las próximas semanas”.

Ambas vacunas requieren dos dosis, 21 días de diferencia para la vacuna Pfizer y 28 días para Moderna, y ambas han demostrado ser al menos un 94% eficaces para prevenir casos sintomáticos.

“Estamos recibiendo suministros adicionales de las vacunas cada semana, y hemos establecido un sistema sofisticado para garantizar que las dosis se almacenen y distribuyan adecuadamente a nuestros socios de la manera más rápida y eficiente posible”, dijo Hagman.

Los siguientes hospitales y centros médicos están vacunando a los trabajadores de la salud de primera línea:

Arrowhead Regional Medical Center

Ballard Rehabilitation Hospital

Barstow Community Hospital

Bear Valley Medical Center

Canyon Ridge Hospital

Kindred Hospital (Ontario, Rancho)

Chino Valley Medical Center

Colorado River Medical Center

Community Hospital of San Bernardino

Desert Valley Hospital

Hi-Desert Medical Center

Kaiser Permanente (Fontana, Ontario)

Loma Linda Medical Center

Loma Linda University Behavioral Health Medical Center

Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital

Montclair Hospital Medical Center

Mountains Community Hospital

Patton State Hospital

Redlands Community Hospital

San Antonio Regional Hospital

St. Bernardine Medical Center

St. Mary Medical Center – Apple Valley

Totally Kids Rehabilitation Hospital

Victor Valley Global Medical Center

Obtener ayuda para su enfermedad o lesión durante la pandemia

Con el coronavirus apretando su control sobre el hospital y los sistemas médicos de emergencia, las personas a menudo se quedan preguntándose cómo buscar mejor tratamiento cuando se enferman o se lesionan. Para muchos, todo lo que saben son ambulancias y departamentos de emergencia de hospitales. Sin embargo, esas opciones de último recurso representan sólo una fracción del sistema completo de atención médica disponible para el público.

“San Bernardino es similar a otros condados de la región en su enfoque para proporcionar atención médica a sus residentes y visitantes”, dijo Tom Marshall, Jefe Adjunto del Distrito de Protección contra Incendios del Condado de San Bernardino y Comandante de Incidentes del Condado de San Bernardino #1 (XBO IMT).  Los proveedores de atención primaria, los médicos, los profesionales de enfermería y los asistentes médicos son la primera línea para la atención médica de por vida.

“Estos proveedores desarrollan relaciones con sus pacientes a través de chequeos anuales y el manejo de enfermedades crónicas. También son una excelente fuente de enfermedades emergentes o lesiones menores”, dijo Marshall. Los proveedores de atención primaria representan la concentración más alta de proveedores de atención médica en el sistema.

Cuando las enfermedades o lesiones ocurren fuera del horario comercial normal (o si un paciente está viajando), los centros de atención de urgencia y las clínicas de salud están dotados de personal y están equipados para manejar estas mismas enfermedades y a menudo proporcionan atención avanzada como radiografías y tratamiento de heridas. Aunque no son tan sólidas como el sistema de atención primaria, las horas extendidas de los centros de atención urgente, muchas de las cuales están abiertas las 24 horas del día, son una sólida red de apoyo para los proveedores de atención primaria. Hay más camas y proveedores de atención urgente que camas en las salas de emergencias en la región.

Cuando su mejor opción es la Sala de Emergencias

Para pacientes con enfermedades potencialmente mortales o lesiones complejas, el departamento de emergencias es el destino de elección. Este subconjunto de pacientes puede requerir la asistencia de numerosos trabajadores de la salud. Tratar a un paciente gravemente enfermo o gravemente lesionado a menudo involucra a múltiples enfermeras y médicos.  Representando el componente más pequeño del sistema de atención médica, el departamento de emergencias es a menudo el primero en ser abrumado con los pacientes que pueden tratar en otro lugar, lo que resulta en tiempos de espera que pueden durar varias horas.

Cuando la unidad de cuidados intensivos de un hospital está en capacidad, el desbordamiento va al departamento de emergencias (ED) debido a la capacitación y las capacidades del personal del ED. Esto también crea una escasez de camas disponibles en la ED. Los pacientes de la UCI que se encuentran en la ED a menudo requieren la dedicación de una enfermera de ED que de otro modo sería capaz de manejar a tres pacientes a la vez. Esta falta de camas y personal crea una copia de seguridad en el sistema que no se puede deshacer a medida que los pacientes adicionales continúan llegando en ambulancia y vehículo privado.

Las ambulancias que llegan a un servicio de urgencias sin camas abiertas se ven obligadas a esperar. Esto disminuye el número de ambulancias disponibles para llamadas adicionales al 911.

“Muchas agencias tienen un estándar para llegar a la escena de una llamada al 911 en menos de 10 minutos”, dijo Nathan Cooke, subjefe del Distrito de Bomberos del Valle de Chino y Comandante Adjunto de Incidentes de la XBO IMT. “Sin embargo, los efectos de un sistema hospitalario estirados hasta sus límites crean un efecto de goteo que amenaza la estabilidad del sistema médico de emergencia 911”.

Considere opciones alternativas

Podemos encontrar la mejor atención para nosotros y nuestros seres queridos utilizando toda la capacidad del sistema de atención médica. Comuníquese con su proveedor médico primario o línea de asesoramiento de enfermeras para problemas médicos de rutina o para analizar sus síntomas. Si se trata de una situación urgente, como la necesidad de una recarga de recetas o una laceración menor que puede necesitar ser suturada, las atencións urgentes están listas para ayudar.

Recientemente, los paramédicos y EMT en el condado de San Bernardino que responden a las llamadas al 911 y determinan que un paciente está estable y no sufre ningún evento potencialmente mortal o de inhabilitación para la vida comenzó a educar y derivar a los pacientes en estas vías alternativas del sistema de salud.

“Esto ha dado lugar a los beneficios mutuos de garantizar que los pacientes reciban la atención adecuada para su queja actual, disminuyendo la carga de trabajo de los servicios de emergencia y manteniendo las ambulancias disponibles para los enfermos críticos y heridos”, dijo el Jefe Adjunto Marshall.

Llamar al 911 para recibir asesoramiento nunca es apropiado ni los que llaman proporcionarán consejos durante la llamada. Buscar transporte en ambulancia a un servicio de urgencias para una prueba COVID o con la esperanza de recibir la vacuna COVID es igualmente inapropiado y sólo sirve para enfatizar aún más un sistema que está en su límite.

Nadie quiere estar enfermo, especialmente durante la temporada de vacaciones.  Con la triple amenaza de resfriados, gripe y COVID-19, sus acciones más seguras siguen siendo el lavado frecuente de manos, desinfectando las superficies comúnmente tocadas, limitando el contacto con los demás a actividades esenciales y usando una cobertua facial cuando no se puede mantener el distanciamiento social. Estamos todos juntos en esto. Ayúdanos a ayudarte.

Oficial de Salud Pública del Condado comparte la importancia de la vacuna Moderna

El Dr. Michael Sequeira, oficial de salud pública del Condado de San Bernardino, compartió sus puntos de vista personales sobre la importancia de la vacuna Moderna en este breve video. También da algunas ideas sobre las ventajas únicas de manejar esta vacuna.

Actualización del Sheriff sobre presos y empleados que dan positivo para COVID-19

Un total de 747 presos del condado han dado positivo por COVID-19. Muchos de los presos sólo están experimentando síntomas menores del virus. Los presos infectados están aislados, siendo monitoreados durante todo el día, y están recibiendo tratamiento médico. Un total de 651 presos se han recuperado de la enfermedad.

Un total de 686 empleados del departamento han dado positivo en COVID-19 y se autoaislan en casa; 489 empleados se han recuperado del virus. Se espera que otros empleados vuelvan al trabajo en las próximas semanas. Se desconoce cuándo o dónde los empleados fueron infectados con el virus. El departamento sigue animando a todos los miembros del departamento a que atened las advertencias de los funcionarios de salud.

Estadísticas más recientes

170,855 Casos Confirmados         (un 1,5% más del día anterior)

1,407 Muertes                                 (un 1,4% más del día anterior)

1,526,935 Probados                       (un 1,5% más del día anterior)

Capacidad actual de la UCI del sur de California: 0% (Objetivo de levantar la orden de estadía en el hogar del estado: 15%)

Para obtener más estadísticas del Panel de Vigilancia COVID-19, haga clic en la pestaña de escritorio o móvil en el sbcovid19.com sitio web del Condado.

Para toda la información relacionada con COVID-19, incluyendo estadísticas de casos, preguntas frecuentes, pautas y recursos, visite la página web de COVID-19 del Condado en http://sbcovid19.com/.  Los residentes del Condado de San Bernardino también pueden llamar a la línea de ayuda COVID-19 al (909) 387-3911 para obtener información general y recursos sobre el virus. La línea telefónica NO es para llamadas médicas y está disponible de lunes a viernes, de 9 a.m. a 5 p.m. Si tiene preguntas sobre servicios sociales, llame al 211.

 

December 21, 2020 Update – Special Edition

The County Update publishes each Wednesday and also as needed, to share important news and resources in our battle against COVID-19 and to keep our economy running. We remain here for you. #SBCountyTogether

For latest COVID-19 statistics and important links, scroll to the bottom of today’s Update

In today’s Update:

  • County receives shipment of Moderna vaccine

Moderna Vaccine Shipped to San Bernardino County

San Bernardino County was among the first in the state today to receive the recently approved Moderna vaccine. The 21,650 doses received by the County today are being shipped to health care partners throughout the county and will be administered to frontline health care workers beginning immediately.

Moderna joins Pfizer as the only vaccines approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use to fight COVID-19. Thousands of health care professionals in the county have received the vaccine, and with more shipments expected weekly, it is the hope of public health officials that there will be enough vaccines for all frontline hospital workers by end of this week.

“For several months, San Bernardino County has been working aggressively with the state and our countywide health system to craft a plan for shipping, storage and distribution of vaccines once they became available,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman. “This preparation put us in an excellent position to get doses to these frontline heroes. It is our hope that we will have given the first dose to all of our frontline health care workers by the first or second week of January.”

Both vaccines require two doses, 21 days apart for the Pfizer vaccine and 28 days for Moderna, and both have shown to be at least 94% effective at preventing symptomatic cases.

Latest Stats

163,945 Confirmed Cases             (up 4% from the previous day)
1,375 Deaths                                     (up 3.6% from the previous day)
1,494,409 Tests                                (up 2.7% from the previous day)

Current Southern California ICU Capacity: 0% (Goal to lift State Stay-at-Home Order: 15%)

For more statistics from the COVID-19 Surveillance Dashboard, click the desktop or mobile tab on the County’s sbcovid19.com website.

For all COVID-19 related information, including case statistics, FAQs, guidelines and resources, visit the County’s COVID-19 webpage at http://sbcovid19.com/.  Residents of San Bernardino County may also call the COVID-19 helpline at (909) 387-3911 for general information and resources about the virus. The phone line is NOT for medical calls and is available Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. If you have questions about social services, please call 211.

Actualización del 21 de diciembre de 2020

Edición especial

La Actualización del Condado se publica una vez a la semana los miércoles, y también según sea necesario, con el fin de compartir noticias y recursos importantes en nuestra batalla contra COVID-19. Nos quedamos aquí para ti. #SBCountyTogether

Para las estadísticas más recientes y enlaces importantes, desplácese hasta la parte inferior de la actualización de hoy.

En la actualización de hoy:

  • El condado recibe envío de la vacuna Moderna

Vacuna Moderna enviada al condado de San Bernardino

El condado de San Bernardino fue uno de los primeros en el estado hoy en recibir la vacuna Moderna recientemente aprobada. Las 21,650 dosis recibidas por el Condado hoy en día están siendo enviadas a socios de atención médica en todo el condado y serán administradas a los trabajadores de atención médica de primera línea a partir de inmediato.

Moderna se une a Pfizer como las únicas vacunas aprobadas por la Administración de Alimentos y Medicamentos para su uso para luchar contra COVID-19. Miles de profesionales de la salud en el condado han recibido la vacuna, y con más envíos esperados semanalmente, es la esperanza de los funcionarios de salud pública que habrá suficientes vacunas para todos los trabajadores de los hospitales de primera línea para finales de esta semana.

“Durante varios meses, el Condado de San Bernardino ha estado trabajando agresivamente con el estado y nuestro sistema de salud en todo el condado para elaborar un plan para el envío, almacenamiento y distribución de vacunas una vez que estén disponibles”, dijo el presidente de la Junta de Supervisores, Curt Hagman. “Esta preparación nos puso en una excelente posición para conseguir dosis a estos héroes de primera línea. Esperamos que hayamos dado la primera dosis a todos nuestros trabajadores sanitarios de primera línea antes de la primera o segunda semana de enero”.

Ambas vacunas requieren dos dosis, 21 días de diferencia para la vacuna Pfizer y 28 días para Moderna, y ambas han demostrado ser al menos un 94% eficaces para prevenir casos sintomáticos.

Estadísticas más recientes

163,945 Casos Confirmados      (un 4 % más del día anterior)

1,375 Muertes                           (un 3,6% más del día anterior)

1,494,409 Probados                  (un 2,7% más del día anterior)

Capacidad actual de la UCI del sur de California: 0% (Objetivo de levantar el orden de estadía en el hogar del estado: 15%)

Para obtener más estadísticas del Tablero de Vigilancia COVID-19, haga clic en la pestaña de escritorio o móvil en sbcovid19.com sitio web del Condado.

Para toda la información relacionada con COVID-19, incluyendo estadísticas de casos, preguntas frecuentes, pautas y recursos, visite la página web de COVID-19 del Condado en http://sbcovid19.com/.  Los residentes del Condado de San Bernardino también pueden llamar a la línea de ayuda COVID-19 al (909) 387-3911 para obtener información general y recursos sobre el virus. La línea telefónica NO es para llamadas médicas y está disponible de lunes a viernes, de 9 a.m. a 5 p.m. Si tiene preguntas sobre servicios sociales, llame al 211.

 

 

 

County petitions Supreme Court for local control of COVID-19 measures

San Bernardino County has filed an action directly in the California Supreme Court asking the court to find that the governor’s stay-at-home orders exceed the authority found in the California Emergency Services Act. The county seeks to exercise local control in response to the COVID-19 pandemic rather than be restrained by the state’s regional approach that treats San Bernardino County the same as significantly different counties such as Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and San Diego.

“The governor is not permitted to act as both the executive and legislative branch for nine months under the California Emergency Services Act,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman. “If it is concluded that the act allows him to do so, the act is unconstitutional as it permits the delegation of the Legislature’s powers to the executive branch in violation of the California Constitution.”

San Bernardino County has worked tirelessly on behalf of county residents and businesses urging the state to recognize that the county’s size and geographic diversity should allow for fewer restrictions in communities with lower COVID-19 metrics than the county as a whole.

“The governor declared that the state’s approach would be based on science and data, but the state has not produced science or data that suggest the restrictions he has imposed would address the current trajectory of the pandemic in San Bernardino County,” said former Supervisor Josie Gonzales, who joined the county in the Supreme Court filing as a private citizen.

The filing states the county seeks to reclaim its constitutional authority “to tailor regulations and orders which are specific to its residents based on facts which are unique to their locations rather than subject its residents to overbroad multi-county, Governor-implemented, regionalized lockdowns.”

December 8, 2020 Update – Special Edition

The County Update publishes each Wednesday, and also as needed, to share important news and resources in our battle against COVID-19 and to keep our economy running. We remain here for you. #SBCountyTogether

For latest Statistics and link to our COVID-19 Community Testing page, scroll to the bottom of today’s Update

In today’s Update:

  • County swears in new Supervisors
  • Regional Stay Home Order now in effect

 County Welcomes New Supervisors

Former Congressman and retired U.S. Marine Col. Paul Cook, County Supervisor Dawn Rowe, and former Rialto Councilman and State Assembly Member Joe Baca, Jr. were administered the oath of office on Monday, Dec. 7, and began four-year terms on the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors.

Supervisor Paul Cook

They join Supervisor and Board Chairman Curt Hagman and Supervisor Janice Rutherford on the body that governs an award-winning organization made up of more than 23,000 employees and more than 100 departments, divisions, and agencies offering a diverse array of essential and quality-of-life services to more than 2.2 million county residents.

“I am very, very honored to be here,” Supervisor Cook said after being sworn in by his wife Jeanne. “Local government is where it all begins. This is part of the reason I got involved – to make a difference.”

After being administered the oath by her father, Robert Haynes, Supervisor Rowe said, “I would like to thank the voters. It is an honor to be here. It has been a long journey for me since the time I was appointed in December 2018.”

Supervisor Dawn Rowe

“I’ve had the chance to work with great people and I’ve learned a lot,” Rowe said. “I’m very blessed that God has placed me here to do good work for our citizens.”

“These are challenging times, and I’m looking forward to taking on the challenge and working with all of you and working for this community,” Supervisor Baca said after being sworn in by his father, retired seven-term Congressman Joe Baca, Sr.

Due to COVID-19, attendance was limited to a small group of masked and socially distanced family members, staff, and friends. A recording of the event can be viewed on the CountyDirect Broadcast Network under the “Other Meetings and Events tab.

Supervisor Joe Baca, Jr.

Supervisor Cook was elected in March to represent the First Supervisorial District, which includes the Town of Apple Valley and the cities of Adelanto, Hesperia, Needles, and Victorville. Cook had served in Congress since 2013 and also served in the State Assembly and on the Yucca Valley Town Council. Cook succeeds Robert Lovingood, who retired after serving two terms on the Board of Supervisors.

Supervisor Rowe was elected in March to represent the Third Supervisorial District, which includes the Town of Yucca Valley and the cities of Barstow, Big Bear Lake, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Loma Linda, Redlands, San Bernardino, Twentynine Palms, and Yucaipa. Rowe has served on the Board of Supervisors since December 2018 and previously served on the Yucca Valley Town Council.

Supervisor Baca was elected in November to represent the Fifth Supervisorial District, which includes the cities of Colton, Fontana, Rialto, and San Bernardino. Baca had served on the Rialto City Council since 2006 and also served in the State Assembly. Baca succeeds Josie Gonzales, who retired after serving four terms on the Board of Supervisors.

San Bernardino County Now in State Regional Stay Home Order Due to Increased Hospitalizations

Due to an alarming decrease in ICU capacity in San Bernardino County and throughout Southern California, residents and businesses here are now under a State-mandated Regional Stay Home Order. The new order went into effect at midnight on Sunday and will remain in place for at least three weeks.

“Our county’s hospitalization rate has been rising rapidly for several weeks and our ICU capacity is dwindling toward the single digits. We must ensure capacity for our sickest and most vulnerable residents,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman. “That’s why county leadership and the county’s healthcare and public heath teams are working tirelessly and employing all innovations to increase capacity and move us toward better community health and safety.”

The new State order segments the state into five separate regions. San Bernardino County is part of the Southern California region, which also includes Imperial, Inyo, Mono, Orange, Riverside, Los Angeles, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and Ventura counties. Southern California and the San Joaquin Valley regions are currently under the State stay-at-home mandate.

The State Regional Stay Home Order (PDF), announced December 3, 2020, and a supplemental order, signed December 6, 2020, goes into effect the day after a region has been announced to have less than 15% ICU availability. These orders prohibit private gatherings of any size, close sector operations except for critical infrastructure and retail, and require 100% masking and physical distancing in all others. The Southern California region currently has a 10.1% ICU availability, as of today, Dec. 8.

Once triggered, these State directives will remain in effect for at least 3 weeks. After that period, they will be lifted when a region’s projected ICU capacity meets or exceeds 15%. This will be assessed on a weekly basis after the initial 3 week period. Learn more about these orders on the California Department of Public Health website.

The State order limits retail stores to 20% capacity and 35% for standalone grocery stores. Eating or drinking inside stores is prohibited. Non-essential businesses, meaning those that are not defined as critical infrastructure, must close for in-person activities, with the exception of retail. Essential work is permitted to continue. The new rules also ban non-essential travel, but outdoor recreation facilities will remain open.

Details on what constitutes essential work and businesses, as well as many other Frequently Asked Questions, can be found at https://covid19.ca.gov/stay-home-except-for-essential-needs/.

“The decrease in our ICU capacity is not to be taken lightly. We must do what we can to ensure we have the resources to treat those who need help the most. That’s why the County continues to urge everyone to wear masks, physically distance, and avoid gatherings whenever possible,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman, noting that local data clearly shows that private gatherings of families and friends continues are far and away the leading source of spread within San Bernardino County.

“At the same time, we will continue to work on behalf of our residents and businesses for fair and effective safety measures, and, most of all, securing adequate amounts of vaccine as soon as they are available,” Hagman said.

The County’s posture on the State’s order will be to continue to educate and engage with businesses and organizations on a cooperative basis on safe practices and current health orders, and respond to complaints about violations as appropriate on a case-by-case basis. Complaints can be made through the County’s COVID-19 website.

County attorneys, at the Board of Supervisors’ direction, are continuing to examine what legal options might be available to provide relief to struggling businesses in those areas of the county with lower COVID-19 numbers than the county as a whole.

Latest Stats

108,946 Confirmed Cases             (up 0.9% from the previous day)
1,207 Deaths                                    (up 1.1% from the previous day)
1,232,457 Tests                               (up 1% from the previous day)

Current Southern California ICU Capacity: 10.1 % (Goal to lift State Stay-at-Home Order: 15%)

For more statistics from the COVID-19 Surveillance Dashboard, click the desktop or mobile tab on the County’s sbcovid19.com website.

 For all COVID-19 related information, including case statistics, FAQs, guidelines and resources, visit the County’s COVID-19 webpage at http://sbcovid19.com/.  Residents of San Bernardino County may also call the COVID-19 helpline at (909) 387-3911 for general information and resources about the virus. The phone line is NOT for medical calls and is available Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. If you have questions about social services, please call 211.

Actualización del 8 de diciembre de 2020

Edición Especial

La Actualización del Condado publicará una vez a la semana, los miércoles y también según sea necesario, con el fin de compartir noticias y recursos importantes en nuestra batalla contra COVID-19 y para mantener nuestra economía funcionando. Permanecemos aquí para usted. #SBCountyTogether

Para las estadísticas más recientes y enlaces importantes, desplácese hasta la parte inferior de la actualización de hoy.

En la actualización de hoy:

  • El juramiento de nuevos supervisors del Condado
  • Orden regional de permanecer en casa ahora en efecto

El condado da la bienvenida a los nuevos supervisores

Supervisor Paul Cook

El ex congresista y el ex coronel de la Marina de los Estados Unidos, Paul Cook, la supervisora del condado Dawn Rowe, y el ex concejal de Rialto y miembro de la Asamblea del Estado, Joe Baca, Jr., recibieron el juramento de cargo el lunes 7 de diciembre. Y comenzó cuatro años de duración en la Junta de supervisores del Condado de San Bernardino

Se unen con el Supervisor y Presidente de la Junta de supervisores, Curt Hagman, y la Supervisora, Janice Rutherford, en el organismo que gobierna una organización galardonada compuesta por más de 23,000 empleados y más de 100 departamentos, divisiones, y agencias que ofrecen una variedad diversa de servicios esenciales y de calidad de vida a más de 2.2 millones de residentes del condado.

Supervisor Dawn Rowe

“Es un gran honor para mí estar aquí”, dijo el Supervisor Cook después de haber sido jurado por su esposa Jeanne. “El gobierno local es donde todo comienza. Esto es parte de la razón por la que me involucré – para hacer una diferencia.”

Después de ser administrada el juramento por su padre, Robert Haynes, Supervisora Rowe dijo: “Me gustaría dar las gracias a los votantes. Es un honor estar aquí. Ha sido un largo viaje para mí desde que fui nombrada en diciembre de 2018.”

“He tenido la oportunidad de trabajar con gente estupenda y he aprendido mucho”, dijo Rowe. “Estoy muy bendecida porque Dios me ha puesto aquí para hacer un buen trabajo para nuestros ciudadanos”.

“Estos son tiempos difíciles, y estoy deseando asumir el desafío y trabajar con todos ustedes y trabajar para esta comunidad”, dijo el Supervisor Baca después de haber sido jurado por su padre, el congresista jubilado de siete mandatos Joe Baca, Sr.

Debido a COVID-19, la asistencia se limitó a un pequeño grupo de familiares, miembros del personal y amigos usando máscaras y socialmente distanciados. Una grabación del evento puede verse en la difusión del Condado en la ficha “otras Reuniones y Eventos CountyDirect Broadcast Network.

Supervisor Joe Baca, Jr.

El Supervisor Cook fue elegido en marzo para representar al primer Distrito Supervisor, que incluye la Ciudad de Apple Valley y las ciudades de Adelanto, Hesperia, Needles y Victorville. Cook había servido en el Congreso desde 2013 y también sirvió en la Asamblea Estatal y en el Consejo Municipal de Yucca Valley. Cook sucede a Robert Lovingood, quien se retiró después de cumplir dos términos en la Junta de supervisores.

La supervisora Rowe fue elegida en marzo para representar al Tercer Distrito Supervisor, que incluye la ciudad de Yucca Valley y las ciudades de Barstow, Big Bear Lake, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Loma Linda, Redlands, San Bernardino, Twentynine Palms y Yucaipa. Rowe ha servido en la Junta de Supervisores desde diciembre de 2018 y anteriormente sirvió en el Consejo Municipal de Yucca Valley.

El supervisor Baca fue elegido en noviembre para representar al Quinto Distrito Supervisor, que incluye las ciudades de Colton, Fontana, Rialto y San Bernardino. Baca había servido en el Ayuntamiento de Rialto desde 2006 y también sirvió en la Asamblea Estatal. Baca sucede a Josie Gonzales, quien se retiró después de servir cuatro mandatos en la Junta de Supervisores.

El Condado de San Bernardino ahora bajo un mandato estatal, la Orden Regional de permanecer en casa debido al aumento de hospitalizaciones

Debido a una disminución alarmante en la capacidad de las unidades de cuidados intensivos (ICU) en el condado de San Bernardino y en todo el sur de California, los residentes y negocios aquí están ahora bajo un mandato estatal Orden Regional de permanecer en casa. La nueva orden entró en vigor a medianoche del domingo y permanecerá en vigor al menos 3 semanas.

“La tasa de hospitalización de nuestro condado ha estado aumentando rápidamente durante varias semanas y nuestra capacidad de las unidades de cuidados intensivos (ICU) está bajado al menos de 10%. Debemos garantizar la capacidad de nuestros residentes más enfermos y vulnerables”, dijo el presidente de la Junta de supervisores, Curt Hagman. “por eso los líderes del condado y los equipos de salud y salud pública del condado están trabajando incansablemente y empleando todas las innovaciones para aumentar la capacidad y movernos hacia una mejor salud y seguridad de la comunidad”.

La nueva orden estatal divide el estado en cinco regiones distintas. El Condado de San Bernardino es parte de la región del sur de California, que también incluye los condados Imperial, Inyo, Mono, Orange, Riverside, los Angeles, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Bárbara y Ventura. El sur de California y las regiones del Valle de San Joaquín están actualmente bajo el mandato de permanecer en casa del Estado.

La Orden Regional de permanecer en casa del Estado Regional Stay Home Order (PDF), anunciada el 3 de diciembre de 2020, y una orden suplementaria supplemental order, firmada el 6 de diciembre de 2020, entra en vigor el día después de que se haya anunciado que una región que tiene menos del 15% en las unidades de cuidados intensivos ( ICU). Estas órdenes prohíben las reuniones privadas de cualquier tamaño, cierra las operaciones del sector cercano excepto para la infraestructura crítica y la venta al por menor, y requieren 100% de uso de mascarilla y distanciamiento físico en todos los demás. La región del sur de California tiene actualmente una disponibilidad de 10.1% en UCI, hasta hoy, 8 de diciembre.

Una vez activadas, estas directivas estatales permanecerán en vigor al menos 3 semanas y, después de este periodo, se levantará cuando la capacidad proyectada de las ICU de una región alcance o exceda el 15 %. Esta será evaluada semanalmente después del periodo inicial de 3 semanas.

Obtenga más información sobre estos pedidos en el sitio web del Departamento de Salud Pública de California Learn more about these orders on the California Department of Public Health.

El pedido estatal limita las tiendas minoristas a un 20% de capacidad y un 35% para las tiendas de comestibles independientes. Está prohibido comer o beber dentro de las tiendas. Las empresas no esenciales, es decir, aquellas que no se definen como infraestructuras críticas, deben cerrar para las actividades en persona, con excepción de la venta al por menor. Se permite que continúe el trabajo esencial. Las nuevas normas también prohíben los viajes no esenciales, pero las instalaciones de recreación al aire libre seguirán abiertas.

Los detalles sobre lo que constituye el trabajo esencial y las empresas, así como muchas otras preguntas frecuentes, se pueden encontrar en https://covid19.ca.gov/stay-home-except-for-essential-needs/.

“La disminución de nuestra capacidad en las unidades de cuidados intensivos (ICU) no debe tomarse a la ligera. Debemos hacer lo que podamos para asegurarnos de que contamos con los recursos necesarios para tratar a quienes más necesitan ayuda. Por eso el Condado sigue instando a todos a usar máscaras, mantener la distancia física, y evitar reuniones siempre que sea posible”, dijo el presidente de la Junta de supervisores, Curt Hagman, señalando que los datos locales muestran claramente que las reuniones privadas de familias y amigos continúan siendo la principal fuente de propagación dentro del Condado de San Bernardino.

“Al mismo tiempo, seguiremos trabajando de parte de nuestros residentes y negocios para medidas de seguridad justas y efectivas y, sobre todo, para asegurar cantidades adecuadas de vacuna tan pronto como estén disponibles”, dijo Hagman.

La posición del Condado con la orden del estado será continuar educando y interactuando con las empresas y organizaciones de manera cooperativa sobre prácticas seguras y órdenes de salud actuales, y responder a las quejas sobre violaciones según corresponda caso por caso. Las quejas se pueden hacer a través del sitio web COVID-19 del Condado County’s COVID-19 website.

Los abogados del condado, bajo la dirección de la Junta de supervisores, continúan examinando qué opciones legales podrían estar disponibles para proporcionar alivio a los negocios en dificultades en aquellas áreas del condado con números COVID-19 más bajos que el condado entero.

Estadísticas más recientes

108,946 Casos Confirmados         (un 0.9% desde el día anterior)
1,207 Muertes                                  (un 1.1% desde el día anterior)
1,232,457 Pruebas                          (un 1% desde el día anterior)

Capacidad actual de las unidades de cuidados intensivos (UCI) del sur de California: 10.1 % (objetivo para levantar el pedido de permanencia en casa del estado: el 15 %)

Para obtener más estadísticas del Tablero de Vigilancia COVID-19, haga clic en la pestaña de escritorio o móvil en sbcovid19.com sitio web del Condado.

Para toda la información relacionada con COVID-19, incluyendo estadísticas de casos, preguntas frecuentes, pautas y recursos, visite la página web de COVID-19 del Condado en http://sbcovid19.com/.  Los residentes del Condado de San Bernardino también pueden llamar a la línea de ayuda COVID-19 al (909) 387-3911 para obtener información general y recursos sobre el virus. La línea telefónica NO es para llamadas médicas y está disponible de lunes a viernes, de 9 a.m. a 5 p.m. Si tiene preguntas sobre servicios sociales, llame al 211.

               

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