Translate:
HomeCo
Home
Countywide Vision
Services A-Z
Services
Visiting
Living
Working
Contacts
Email Subscriptions
E-Subscriptions
Envelope GovDelivery NoticesGet e-mail updates when this information changes.

Public Works

County portion of Santa Ana River Trail receives $3.4 million in funding

SANTA ANA RIVER TRAILThe California Coastal Conservancy Board on Thursday approved $3.4 million for construction of a portion of the Santa Ana River Trail in San Bernardino County.

Once completed, the Santa Ana River Trail will be about 100 miles long and will connect the Inland Empire from the crest of the San Bernardino Mountains to the Pacific Ocean near Huntington Beach. Once complete, it will be one of the longest urban recreation river parkways in the United States.

The $3.4 million will be used for the construction of Phase 3 of the trail from Waterman Avenue in San Bernardino to California Street in Redlands. This trail segment consists of a paved bikeway – a shared use path that is physically separated from any street or highway and may be used by pedestrians, skaters, wheelchair users, and other non-motorized users.

The funding is part of the Proposition 84 bond that allotted $45 million to the Santa Ana River Trail, giving each county $10 million towards their segment of the trail. The California Coastal Conservancy Board is the administrator of these grant funds.

Once accepted by the Board of Supervisors, the County can begin working on construction documents, permits and then construction of the next 3.8 miles of the trail. After completion of Phase 3, there will still be 11 miles of the trail to compete which could take approximately four more years.

To view a map of the Phase 3 segment, click here.

Portion of National Trails Highway reopens following floods

Public traveling on NTH againThe San Bernardino County Department of Public Works reopened National Trails Highway from Crucero Road to Amboy Road in Ludlow today at 2 p.m.
Severe thunderstorms blasted the Mojave Desert September 7 and 8 triggering flash floods throughout the desert regions. Closure of I-95, I-40, National Trails Highway (Route 66), Needles Highway, and various other desert roads occurred due to washouts and bridge damage.
The most extensive damage was along National Trails Highway where approximately 40 bridges were damaged along with major portions of the roadway.
Public Works crews have been working diligently to make these repairs. For the most up to date information on road closures we have a web page located here.

Forest Falls grateful for Public Works support

 

Dozens of Forest Falls residents took the time to thank County Public Works road crews in writing for cleaning up their community following a powerful storm that sent a river of mud and boulders through the heart of their mountain village.

Forest Falls letter

On Sunday, August 3, a thunderstorm parked itself just upstream of Forest Falls and dumped almost five inches of rain in less than an hour. A terrifying torrent of water, mud, boulders, and uprooted trees came roaring down into the community, closing Valley of the Falls Drive, Prospect Drive, and other roads, stranding many residents. The incident prompted an emergency proclamation by the Board of Supervisors.

20140804_092940Within a day, County Public Works had cleared roadways enough for residents to gain access to a shelter that had been established at the community center. Within two days, Valley of the Falls Drive and Prospect Drive were re-opened to the public. Unfortunately, Forest Falls is no stranger to these types of disasters.

The community’s unique canyon geography and the tendency of summer thunderstorms to stall upstream make sudden debris flows an all-to-common occurrence. Undeterred, residents have come to take these incidents in stride, and are grateful for the quick and consistent support they receive from numerous County agencies, including the Department of Public Works.

Public Works continues to improve National Trails Highway

#32 WORK IN PROGRESS.jpg 6 #32 WORK IN PROGRESS.jpg 7Publi#32 WORK IN PROGRESS.jpg 2c Works crews continue working hard to get National Trails Highway reopened after incurring damage from the September 2014 storms.

The storms in September damaged sections of National Trails Highway from Hector Road to Amboy. The most extensive damage was along National Trails Highway where approximately 40 bridges were damaged along with major portions of the roadway.  Sections between Hector Road to Crucero Road (Newberry Springs/Ludlow area), Crucero Road to Amboy Road, and Cadiz Road to Mountain Springs Road at Interstate 40 have been closed pending roadway repairs, shoulder repairs and bridge evaluations.

Public Works crews reopened the first stretch of the road, Hector Road to Crucero Road, in November. The photos above are on National Trails Highway, three miles east of Ludlow. The crews are anticipating opening this next section from Ludlow to Amboy sometime in January 2015.

Section of National Trails Highway to reopen

nationaltrailshighwayPublic Works is planning on reopening the section of National Trails Highway from Hector Road to Crucero Road, in the Newberry Springs/Ludlow area, by Friday, November 7.

Severe thunderstorms blasted the Mojave Desert September 7 and 8 triggering flash floods throughout the desert regions.  Closure of I-95, I-40, National Trails Highway (Route 66), Needles Highway, and various other desert roads occurred due to washouts and bridge damage.

The most extensive damage was along National Trails Highway where approximately 40 bridges were damaged along with major portions of the roadway.  Sections between Hector Road to Crucero Road (Newberry Springs/Ludlow, area), Crucero Road to Amboy Road, and Cadiz Road to Mountain Springs Road at I-40 have been closed pending roadway repairs, shoulder repairs and bridge evaluations.

Public Works crews have been working diligently to make these repairs.  This is the first stretch of the road to be reopened since the storms occurred.

It is anticipated the section of roadway between Crucero Road and Amboy Road will be open by the end of December 2014 and the section between Cadiz Road and Mountain Springs Road at I-40 by the end of January 2015.  All of these timeframes could vary depending on the weather.

For further questions please contact the Department of Public Works Operations Division at (909) 387-8063.

Severe storms damage roads and bridges in Mojave Desert

desertflooding1 desertflooding2Severe thunderstorm activity hit the Mojave Desert on Sunday, Sept. 7 and Monday, Sept. 8 triggering flash flood warnings throughout the region.

Because of washouts and bridge damage, Interstate 95, Interstate 40, National Trails Highway, Needles Highway, and various other desert roads were closed. The damaged roads and bridges are located in the communities of Helendale, Silver Lakes, Barstow, Newberry Springs, Ludlow, Amboy and Essex.

The Department of Public Works estimates $1.4 million in damage consisting of debris cleanup, shoulder washouts, bridge damage and roadway asphalt damage. The most extensive damage was along National Trials Highway where currently the sections between Fort Cady Road to Amboy Road, and Cadiz Road to Mountain Springs Road/Interstate 40 are closed pending roadway repairs and bridge evaluations.

 

Public Works clears mud and debris from Needles Highway

Piute #1#2  8-25-13  NHW #3 (2)

Needles Hwy  Flooding 8-19-2014 Piute Wash 008 (2) (3)

Needles District Maintenance Supervisor Donald Toy took the picture to the left of the storm damage across Needles Highway following a series of thunderstorms this month.

The many storms that affected a huge portion of San Bernardino County on August 3 from the foothills of the valley to the Colorado River caused the Board of Supervisors to declare an emergency in order to seek state and federal disaster funds.

The single largest drainage system in eastern San Bernardino County are the Piute Washes on Needles Highway. This watershed magnet collects precipitation from as far away as the Sacramento Mountains, 30 miles to the west to the Piute Range that protects the Mohave National Preserve’s eastern border into Nevada. This flow of rain runoff will at times travel from as far away as Searchlight, Nevada 70 miles to the north. The runoff destination is the Colorado River which is 300 yards east of the Piute Washes north of Needles.

Motorists to Laughlin, Nevada who use Needles Highway will witness flows from Piute Washes causing road closures as maintenance crews wait so debris can be removed. Sometimes, drivers are stranded between washes and must wait for the water to subside before venturing forward.
This week, Public Works crews cleared the mud and debris and got the highway opened up quickly as seen on the right. This is an example of how Government Works.
Final Government Works Stamp

Alabama Street reopened between Highland and Redlands

alabamaredlandsalabamareopenedAlabama Street between the cities of Redlands and Highland reopened today for more than 12,000 motorists who rely on the thoroughfare each day.

The San Bernardino County Flood Control District, along with the City of Highland, the City of Redlands, the City of San Bernardino and the Inland Valley Development Agency and dignitaries celebrated the opening this morning during a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

Alabama has been closed seven times since 2003 for damage to the roadway caused by storm flows from City Creek. The project started in November of 2013 and consisted of construction of two 48-foot-wide by 169-foot-long arch culverts at City Creek; roadway widening and paving; concreted rock slope protection, and the installation of new electric, gas and communication lines. The project was completed on time and under budget. The completed project meets the FEMA-approved 100-year flood capacity and the water-carrying capacity of the road crossing is now increased by more than 600 percent.

The project was completed at a construction cost of $2,350,010. More than 95 percent was funded by grants from the Federal Highway Administration and the state Office of Emergency Services. The remaining costs were shared by the San Bernardino County Flood Control District, the City of Highland, the City of Redlands, the City of San Bernardino and the Inland Valley Development Agency.

Alabama to reopen to traffic by noon on Wednesday

roadopeningThe San Bernardino County Flood Control District, along with the City of Highland, the City of Redlands, the City of San Bernardino and the Inland Valley Development Agency, are happy to announce the upcoming reopening of Alabama Street between Highland and Redlands.  Alabama will be open by noon on Wednesday, August 20, 2014.

Alabama has been closed seven times since 2003 for damage to the roadway caused by storm flows from City Creek.  The project started in November of 2013 and consisted of construction of two 48-foot-wide by 169-foot-long arch culverts at City Creek; roadway widening and paving; concreted rock slope protection, and the installation of new electric, gas and communication lines. The project was completed on time and under budget. The completed project meets the FEMA-approved 100-year flood capacity and the water-carrying capacity of the road crossing is now increased by more than 600 percent.

The project was completed at a construction cost of $2,350,010. More than 95 percent was funded by grants from the Federal Highway Administration and the state Office of Emergency Services. The remaining costs were shared by the San Bernardino County Flood Control District, the City of Highland, the City of Redlands, the City of San Bernardino and the Inland Valley Development Agency.

Thanks to the improvements, a recent storm passed freely through the new arch. The reopening of Alabama will be great news to the 12,000 motorists who have come to rely on this thoroughfare each day.

More information is available by calling the San Bernardino County Flood Control District at (909) 387-7920.

County crews continue cleanup

The County’s Department of Public Works and County Fire Department have been busy helping to restore order to various county communities following Sunday’s floods and debris flows.

ap-image-f8f0fb7fa7fc45d9b8484f6b96aef929Mt. Baldy, Forest Falls, and Oak Glen were hit the hardest. County Public Works Crews have cleared Mt. Baldy Road of debris, and a loader and grader are staged in the area in case additional work is needed. Some reports hold that thunderstorms might return as soon as Sunday.

In Forest Falls, crews were able to open Valley of the Falls Drive, even though cleanup in the community is expected to last at least through August 22. Crews are also expected to spend two more weeks cleaning up in Oak Glen, where at least four major storm culverts were completely blocked. Oak Glen Road is now open.

County Fire Hand Crews have been in Mt. Baldy and Forest Falls helping residents dig out from the mud and debris. County Fire also brought in equipment to start clearing driveways of mud and debris.

The desert areas of the county are suffering as well, with Barstow Heights and Big River the hardest hit. Public Works crews were also dispatched to Helendale, National Trails Highway, and various earthen flood control channels.

Keep up to date on road closures by visiting Public Works’ award-winning website at http://www.sbcounty.gov/dpw/

On Tuesday, the Board of Supervisors ratified a declaration of local emergency signed Monday by County Chief Executive Officer Greg Devereaux. If the governor concurs, the county’s cleanup costs will be eligible for reimbursement and low-interest loans might be available to residents who lost property.

 

Twitter @SBCountyFollow @SBCounty on Twitter!