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County Fire

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July 22, 2022 Update

July 15, 2022 Update

June 24, 2022 Update

Fire & Ice Cream vaccine event set for Saturday in San Bernardino

Free ice cream, churros, and other treats and giveaways await those who participate in the county’s first official Fire and Ice Cream COVID-19 vaccination event Saturday at Nunez Park in San Bernardino.

The county, in partnership with the San Bernardino County Fire Protection District, will lead a parade of fire trucks, other emergency vehicles, the county’s Our Shot for Hope mobile vaccination van, am ice cream truck and a churro van through the streets of the neighborhoods surrounding the park at 12:30 p.m. From 2 to 6 p.m. in Nunez Park, the county will provide the free treats and free “one-and-done” Johnson & Johnson vaccinations. No appointment is necessary.

The vaccinations are for any one age 18 and over. The treats are for everyone. 

“Fire and Ice Cream is an example of how committed we are to making vaccines available across the county, especially in vulnerable or hard-to-reach neighborhoods,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman. “We’re very happy to be doing this in conjunction with our county fire department. Firefighters are trusted heroes in our communities, and nothing draws attention like fire trucks and ice cream trucks!”

Why take the shot for hope? The COVID-19 vaccination will help protect individuals by creating an antibody (immune system) response without having to experience sickness. After you are fully vaccinated for COVID-19, you may be able to start doing some things that you stopped doing because of the pandemic.

Nunez Park is located at 1717 West 5th Street in San Bernardino.

Future Fire and Ice Cream events in other locations throughout the county will be announced soon.

San Bernardino County Fire to Issue Contact-Free Citations for Illegal Fireworks

This year San Bernardino County Fire Prevention Officers will try a new tool to combat illegal fireworks in the communities they serve—contact-free citations.

Rather than chasing down everyone using illegal pyrotechnics, patrolling fire investigators will use geographic information systems (GIS) data to pinpoint the exact location of the violation.

Fire investigators will take photographs and collect other evidence before remotely issuing the property owner an administrative citation that carries a fine of up to $1,250.

Fire officials use a similar GIS system to issue fire hazard abatement notices when property owners neglect to remove weeds, brush, and other fire hazards as required by County ordinance.

A third-party vendor processes the citations and sends them via certified mail. The citations usually arrive about a week to two weeks after being issued.

Landlords may want to remind their tenants not to use illegal fireworks since the citation will be issued to the owner of record, not the tenant.

“Property owners are responsible for what occurs on their property,” Deputy Fire Marshal Adam Panos said.

Property owners will also be given the opportunity to appeal citations.

Fire Marshal Mike Horton said County Fire will utilize contact-free citations in all of the communities it serves. In addition to all unincorporated areas, County Fire serves the cities of Fontana, Grand Terrace, Upland, San Bernardino, Adelanto, Yucca Valley, Twentynine Palms, and Needles.

In addition to issuing contact-free citations, fire investigators will also directly issue $1,250 administrative citations to those caught using illegal fireworks at parks, in the street, or in other public places.

Click here for more information about County Fire’s fireworks enforcement efforts.

 

Local Assistance Center opens to serve people impacted by El Dorado Fire

On Saturday, Nov. 7, San Bernardino County will open a Local Assistance Center (LAC) at the Yucaipa Community Center, 34900 Oak Glen Road in Yucaipa from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The LAC is a one-stop location to access services for residents affected by the El Dorado Fire. Resources are provided free of charge. The following agencies are scheduled to provide resources and/or services at the LAC:

County Departments:

  • Public Health
  • Aging and Adult Services
  • Transitional Assistance Department
  • Behavioral Health
  • Veterans Affairs
  • Workforce Development
  • Auditor-Controller/Treasurer/Tax Collector
  • Purchasing
  • Risk Management
  • Assessor

State Agencies:

  • Cal OES
  • Department of Insurance
  • Franchise Tax Board
  • Department of Motor Vehicles

(State Educational Materials only)

  • CA Contractors State Licensing Board
  • CA Veterans Affairs
  • Employment Development Department

Other Agencies:

  • Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
  • City of Yucaipa

Due to COVID-19, face coverings and social distancing is required at the LAC. For more information, call (909) 790-7460 or visit http://yucaipa.org/.

County to hold COVID-19 press conference

Members of the Board of Supervisors, Sheriff John McMahon, County Public Health Director Trudy Raymundo, physicians from Arrowhead Regional Medical Center and other county officials will provide an update on the novel coronavirus/COVID-19 crisis within the county and answer questions from journalists during a press conference Wednesday morning at 10 a.m.

All Southern California news organizations have been invited and it has been timed to enable Los Angeles-based television stations to broadcast it live if they choose to do so. The county will livestream the press conference and archive a complete recording on the CountyDirect Broadcast Network at https://sanbernardino.granicus.com/player/clip/5055?view_id=19. The event will also be livestreamed via Facebook Live.

Attendance at the press conference will be limited to journalists and professional news organizations.

For information about the coronavirus crisis, visit the County’s coronavirus website at wp.sbcounty.gov/dph/coronavirus. New information and resources have been added and the site is being updated daily. The public can also contact the coronavirus public information line from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday at (909) 387-3911, or email the County at coronavirus@dph.sbcounty.gov.

Fire Chief Munsey to attend State of the Union, promote federal support for public safety

San Bernardino County Fire Protection District Chief Dan Munsey will attend the president’s State of the Union address on Tuesday as the guest of San Bernardino County Congressman Pete Aguilar. Chief Munsey said he sees his attendance as an opportunity to build upon the good working relationships the County has with federal agencies and lawmakers.

County Fire Chief Dan Munsey

“I’m honored to have the opportunity to represent our region and San Bernardino County Fire at the president’s State of the Union address,” Chief Munsey said. “Our county depends on the relationship we have with our federal partners to ensure the safety of our residents, and I look forward to the chance to reinforce that relationship.”

“The County is proud and fortunate to have Chief Munsey represent us and the public safety needs of our residents in Washington and at the State of the Union address,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman. “When disaster strikes our county, the men and women of County Fire stand bravely on the front lines. It is appropriate to have their organization stand as a symbol of the value in partnerships with the federal government.”

Dan Munsey was appointed County Fire Chief in November. Munsey began his career in the fire service in 1995 as a paid-call firefighter. He became a full-time firefighter in 1998, where he was assigned to Lake Arrowhead. He has worked in every division of County Fire, promoting to captain in 2004, battalion chief in 2008, and assistant chief in March 2014.

The San Bernardino County Fire Protection District has about 1,000 employees, covers approximately 19,000 of the county’s 20,105 square miles, and serves more than 60 incorporated municipalities and unincorporated communities within four Regional Service Zones – Mountain, North Desert, South Desert and Valley – including the City of Grand Terrace, City of Hesperia, City of Needles, City of San Bernardino, City of Twentynine Palms, City of Upland, Town of Yucca Valley, and unincorporated areas. Additionally, County Fire provides contractual fire protection services to two cities: Adelanto and Fontana, via its independent fire protection district.

County Fire is a community-based, all-hazard emergency services organization providing emergency mitigation and management for fire suppression, emergency medical services, ambulance services, hazardous materials response, arson investigation, hazard and terrorism/weapons of mass destruction abatement, and technical rescue, including water-borne, flooding and mudslide, and winter rescue operations.

 

Arrive safely with these winter driving safety tips

Reduce Your Speed

Commuting in winter weather poses an increased risk to driver safety. The National Weather Service reports that each year, on average, 5,000 people are killed and more than 418,000 are injured due to weather-related vehicle crashes. Rain and snow require drivers to take extra precautions to ensure a safe arrival to your destination. Before you head out on the road in these conditions, make sure to follow these Winter Driving Safety Tips to help keep you safe.

  • Drive Slowly: Most winter accidents are a result of driving too fast for the current conditions. Remember to slow down on the roads and give yourself extra time to get to your destination.
  • Don’t Tailgate: Be sure to leave at least three car lengths in between you and the driver ahead of you during icy or snowy weather conditions. It takes a longer distance to stop your vehicle on winter roads.
  • Turn on Your Headlights: Visibility is greatly hindered in rain, fog, ice, or snow storms so remember to turn on your low beams when in these conditions so other drivers can see you, even during daylight.
  • Avoid Distracted or Drowsy Driving: Limit your distractions while driving in poor weather conditions. Keep your awareness on the road. Never drive when tired and leave the cell phone alone.
  • Keep Up with Your Car Maintenance: Check your windshield wipers, tires, brakes, etc. on a regular basis to avoid a mishap while driving.
  • Make Sure You Can See Out of All Windows: Give yourself extra time before you drive to make sure your windows are defrosted and scraped clean of any ice that is obstructing your vision and ability to be an alert driver.
  • Check the Roadways and Traffic Ahead of Time: Winter conditions can be somewhat unpredictable so it’s important to check the roadways and traffic before you head out in order to give yourself enough time to safely arrive at your destination. Speeding in poor weather conditions puts other drivers and emergency responders at risk. Check highway conditions at www.dot.ca.gov/cgi-bin/roads.cgi
  • Always Carry Snow Chains: Invest in a set of snow chains for each of your vehicles and carry them in your vehicle, even if it’s not snowing. Practice installing your snow chains away from busy roads and be aware of weather conditions and snow chain speed limits.
  • Slow down at the first sign of rain, especially after a dry spell. This is when many roads are the most slippery, because oil and dust have not washed away. A slippery road will not give your tires the grip they need. Drive more slowly than you would on a dry road. Adjust your speed as follows:
    • Wet road: go 5 to 10 mph slower
    • Packed snow: reduce your speed by half
    • Ice: slow to a crawl

Prepare Your Vehicle

  • Make sure all fluid levels are full and ensure that the lights, heater and windshield wipers are in proper condition.
  • Keep your gas tank near full to avoid ice in the tank and fuel lines.
  • Avoid traveling alone. Let someone know your timetable and primary and alternate routes.
  • Call 511 for the latest traffic/road incidents, construction and weather conditions and restrictions.
  • Carry a Winter Storm Survival Kit that includes:
    • Mobile phone, charger, batteries
    • Blankets/sleeping bags
    • Flashlight with extra batteries
    • First-aid kit
    • Knife
    • High-calorie, non-perishable food
    • Extra clothing to keep dry
    • Large empty can to use as emergency toilet, tissues, toilet paper and paper towels
    • Small can and waterproof matches to melt snow for drinking water
    • Sack of sand or cat litter for traction
    • Shovel
    • Windshield scraper and brush
    • Tool kit
    • Tow rope
    • Battery booster cables
    • Water container
    • Candle and matches to provide light and in an emergency, lifesaving heat.
    • Compass and road maps, don’t depend on mobile devices with limited battery life

(Source: National Weather Service)

San Bernardino County Fire reminds you to be prepared for a disaster with the free Ready SB County Disaster Preparedness App. During an emergency, you’ll stay up-to date on evacuations, shelter locations, traffic alerts, and emergency resources available in your area.

Download the Ready SB County Disaster Preparedness App at:
http://www.ReadySB.com/

For a website version of these tips, visit:
https://www.sbcfire.org/SafetyTips/WinterDriving.aspx

Assistant Fire Chief Dan Munsey appointed new County Fire Chief

Assistant Fire Chief Dan Munsey

Assistant County Fire Chief Dan Munsey will serve as the new Fire Chief for the San Bernardino County Fire Protection District effective immediately following his appointment by County Chief Executive Officer Gary McBride, with concurrence from the Board of Supervisors.

Munsey, who has served with County Fire since 1995, succeeds Mark Hartwig, who left the department in February to accept a job as fire chief for Santa Barbara County. Deputy Fire Chief Don Trapp has served as interim chief since Hartwig’s departure.

Munsey’s appointment concluded a nationwide recruiting effort that began shortly after Hartwig’s departure and yielded a broad field of applicants.

“There were several outstanding candidates,” McBride said. “But the Board and I concluded that Assistant Chief Munsey offered the best combination of the traits we were seeking: the leadership skills and commitment to operate County Fire effectively and professionally, and the ability and desire to work productively with public safety agencies throughout the county.”

“Being chosen to serve as fire chief for this organization is a tremendous honor,” Munsey said. “This is a team of highly skilled, dedicated professionals who serve a great community. I am excited about this opportunity to lead them and provide them with the tools and the environment they need to help County Fire fully achieve its great potential.”

In his most recent assignment as Assistant Chief, Division 11, Munsey was responsible for rescue operations, fire, and emergency medical response in the High Desert region, which is the largest of the five regions served by San Bernardino County Fire.

Munsey began his career in the fire service in 1995 as a paid-call firefighter. He became a full-time firefighter in 1998, where he was assigned to Lake Arrowhead. He has worked in every division of County Fire, promoting to captain in 2004, battalion chief in 2008, and assistant chief in March 2014.

Munsey holds a master’s degree in public administration with an emphasis on business and government and a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Grand Canyon University. Munsey is the current president of the Operations Section of the California Fire Chiefs Association and president of the Hi-Desert Water District Board of Directors. He has been active for a decade in the Rotary Club of San Bernardino, Victorville, and Yucca Valley.

In 2013, Munsey graduated from the San Bernardino County Management & Leadership Academy, a program that provides comprehensive management and leadership training to county employees. Participants gain theoretical and practical knowledge of public service management and leadership practices, with specific emphasis on understanding their application within San Bernardino County government.

The San Bernardino County Fire Protection District has about 1,000 employees, covers approximately 19,000 of the county’s 20,105 square miles, and serves more than 60 incorporated municipalities and unincorporated communities within four Regional Service Zones – Mountain, North Desert, South Desert and Valley – including the City of Grand Terrace, City of Hesperia, City of Needles, City of San Bernardino, City of Twentynine Palms, City of Upland, Town of Yucca Valley, and unincorporated areas. Additionally, County Fire provides contractual fire protection services to two cities: Adelanto and Fontana, via its independent fire protection district.

County Fire is a community-based, all-hazard emergency services organization providing emergency mitigation and management for fire suppression, emergency medical services, ambulance services, hazardous materials response, arson investigation, hazard and terrorism/weapons of mass destruction abatement, and technical rescue, including water-borne, flooding and mudslide, and winter rescue operations.

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