Translate:
HomeCo
Home
Countywide Vision
Services A-Z
Services
Visiting
Living
Working
Contacts
Email Subscriptions
E-Subscriptions
Envelope GovDelivery NoticesGet e-mail updates when this information changes.

Monthly Archives: December 2020

December 30, 2020 Update

The County Update publishes once a week on Wednesdays and also as needed to share important news and resources in our battle against COVID-19. We remain here for you. #SBCountyTogether

Happy New Year! County offices will be closed for the New Year’s holiday on Thursday, December 31 and Friday, January 1. Police, fire and other emergency services will continue to operate throughout the holiday weekend.

Offices will return to regular hours on Monday, January 4.

In today’s Update:

  • County ready to adapt new tiered phases of vaccine distribution
  • Vaccinations continue on Phase 1A to medical first responders
  • County testing facilities expanding hours
  • Moving Forward program provides housing for individuals in Project Roomkey
  • Sheriff COVID-19 cases update

The new tiered vaccination phases as proposed by the state.

County Will Adapt New State Recommendations for Vaccine Distribution

San Bernardino County is making steady progress through Phase 1A of the state’s vaccination campaign, and is monitoring recommendations being considered by California’s Community Vaccine Advisory Committee. The new guidelines were announced by Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday, Dec. 28 and are expected to be finalized by the state California Department of Public Health very soon.

If the newly adapted Phases are approved, there will be three new Tiers in Phase 1A. San Bernardino County is currently in Tier 1 of Phase 1A (see above chart for reference), which means we are currently distributing vaccine doses to frontline health care workers, medical first responders (e.g. paramedics) and dialysis centers; and soon to skilled nursing facilities and other long-term care residents.

“For two weeks now we have successfully brought both Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines to our county’s hospitals and medical centers, as well as EMTs and paramedics,” said County Public Health Director Corwin Porter. “We’re now working with Walgreens and CVS Pharmacy to deliver vaccines to other groups included in this phase, specifically staff and residents at skilled nursing facilities and other long-term care residences.”

The County expects to complete Phase 1A, Tier 1 by mid-January and move into the next Tier.

Tier 2 of Phase 1A will include those receiving intermediate and supportive care; home health care and in-home supportive services; community health workers (including promotoras); public health field staff; primary care clinics and health centers; correctional facility clinics; and urgent care clinics.

Tier 3 of Phase 1B will include specialty clinics; laboratory workers; dental/oral health clinics; and pharmacy staff.

Moving into Phase 1B, there are two Tiers. In Tier 1 of Phase 1B, the vaccine doses will be administered to frontline essential workers in non-medical fields, such as food and agriculture sectors; teachers and support staff; emergency services such as police and fire; childcare workers; farmworkers; and any citizens over the age of 75.

In Tier 2 of Phase 1B, the vaccine will be administrated to individuals over 65 with serious risk factors; the homeless; inmates in jails and prisons; and essential workers in transportation, logistics, critical manufacturing, industrial, residential and commercial sectors.

Identifying Phase 1C recipients is not expected to be finalized for several weeks. They will likely include individuals aged 16-64 with underlying medical conditions, as well as workers in other essential industries. This will then allow for Phase 2 of vaccination distribution, for individuals over 16 not included in prior phases.

 

 

 

In this video, paramedics from Redlands and San Bernardino County fire departments share their vaccination experience.

County Paramedics and EMTs Begin Receiving COVID-19 Vaccine

Currently, the County of San Bernardino is in Phase 1A of vaccine distribution. Vaccines are administered at no cost. The public can follow the phases of the vaccination rollout on our website at sbcovid19.com/vaccine.

The rollout has gone smoothly in San Bernardino County going first to frontline health care workers, people at skilled nursing facilities and long-term care facilities, as well as medical first responders such as paramedics and EMTs.

The County has delivered more than 33,000 doses of the vaccine so far that we received from the state and supplies to implement the shots have come with the vaccines. The County is prepared to conduct point-of-dispensing sites at multiple locations and we will be coordinating with our cities, towns and community partners to reach all communities.

 Testing Facilities Expand Hours to Accommodate County Residents

County residents have responded impressively to officials’ pleas to get tested for COVID-19, with more than 465,000 tests having already been conducted in December alone.

Demand for tests continues to be strong, with appointments consistently filling up two or three days in advance. In response, several of the County’s testing facilities are expanding hours until 8 p.m. to accommodate residents and are expected to maintain these extended hours through January 8. A list of testing sites and extended hours can be found here.

“We are proud of how County residents have responded to our requests to get testing,” said County Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman, who noted that the County’ testing numbers have recently exceeded state requirements. “We are continuing to encourage everyone, including those without symptoms, to schedule an appointment to get tested.”

Hagman noted that while many of the County’s testing locations continue to accept walk-ins, those without appointments are typically having to wait up to 90 minutes or longer to actually receive a test.

“Getting tested is both painless and cost free,” said Hagman, “and for those with an appointment, it’s quick, easy and convenient. So please, schedule an appointment at your earliest convenience.”

Project Roomkey Transitions into Moving Forward Program

A partnership between the County, Chance Project and Knowledge and Education for Your Success (KEYS) formed to provide assistance to those experiencing homelessness who are at high risk for COVID-19.  Moving Forward transitions individuals from Project Roomkey, a state initiative to provide a safe place for homeless to isolate during COVID-19, to interim and permanent housing.

Individuals who receive assistance through Project Roomkey and Moving Forward include homeless individuals over the age of 65, those who may have medical conditions and pregnant women. To date, Moving Forward has assisted nearly 50 individuals transition out of homelessness.

“This collaborative effort has been pivotal in ensuring the health and safety of some of the County’s most vulnerable residents,” said CaSonya Thomas, assistant executive officer for the County Human Services. “Moving Forward is dedicated to addressing the unique needs of the homeless in our region through the coordination of county, community and local efforts to provide services that will result in life-changing, long-term solutions.”

Moving Forward provides support in the form of outreach services, housing access and navigation services, and comprehensive case management. The goal of the program is to rapidly connect individuals and families to housing and services.

“We are grateful for the partnership with the County of San Bernardino Human Services and our partners in this endeavor including Housing for All, Keys, Inland Housing  Solutions, Knock Knock Angels, the County’s Department of Aging and Adult Services, and all the other dedicated community partners,” said Ron Griffin, CEO of the Chance Project. “They were all a part of the transition of county residents in housing crisis to permanent housing for years to come.”

For more information about Moving Forward view the attached video, or email info@thechanceproject.org

Sheriff Update on Inmates and Employees Testing Positive for COVID-19

A total of 803 County jail inmates have tested positive for COVID-19. Many of the inmates are only experiencing minor symptoms of the virus. The infected inmates are in isolation, being monitored around the clock, and are being provided with medical treatment. A total of 723 inmates have recovered from the illness.

A total of 739 department employees have tested positive for COVID-19 and are self-isolating at home; 587 employees have recovered from the virus. Other employees are expected to return to work in the next few weeks. It is unknown when or where the employees were infected with the virus. The department continues to encourage all department members to heed the warnings of health officials.

Latest Stats

193,214 Confirmed Cases             (up 1.1% from the previous day)
1,442 Deaths                                     (up 0.3% from the previous day)
1,644,695 Tests                                (up 0.5% from the previous day)

Current Southern California ICU Capacity: 0% (Goal to lift State Stay-at-Home Order: 15%)

For more statistics from the COVID-19 Surveillance Dashboard, click the desktop or mobile tab on the County’s sbcovid19.com website.

For all COVID-19 related information, including case statistics, FAQs, guidelines and resources, visit the County’s COVID-19 webpage at http://sbcovid19.com/.  Residents of San Bernardino County may also call the COVID-19 helpline at (909) 387-3911 for general information and resources about the virus. The phone line is NOT for medical calls and is available Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. If you have questions about social services, please call 211.

Actualización del 30 de diciembre de 20

La Actualización del Condado publicará una vez a la semana, los miércoles y también según sea necesario, con el fin de compartir noticias y recursos importantes en nuestra batalla contra COVID-19 y para mantener nuestra economía funcionando. Permanecemos aquí para usted. #SBCountyTogether

¡Feliz año Nuevo! Las oficinas del condado estarán cerradas para el día festivo del Año Nuevo jueves 31 de diciembre y el viernes 1 de enero. La policía, los bomberos y otros servicios de emergencia continuarán operando durante todo  el fin de semana festivo.
Las oficinas volverán a las horas regulares el lunes 4 de enero.

En la actualización de hoy:

  • El Condado está listo para para adaptar nuevas fases estratificadas de la distribución de vacunas
  • Las vacunas continúan en la fase 1A para los primeros respondedores médicos.
  • Sitios de pruebas del condado amplían las horas de operación
  • El programa Moving Forward proporciona alojamiento para individuos en el programa Project Roomkey
  • Actualización de casos de COVID-19 del Sheriff

Las nuevas fases de vacunación estratificadas propuestas por el Estado.

El Condado adaptará nuevas recomendaciones estatales para la distribución de vacunas

El Condado de San Bernardino está haciendo un progreso constante a través de la fase 1A de la campaña de vacunación del estado, y está monitoreando las recomendaciones que está siendo considerada por el Comité Asesor de vacunas comunitarias de California California’s Community Vaccine Advisory Committee. Las nuevas directrices fueron anunciadas por el Gobernador Gavin Newsom el lunes 28 de diciembre y se espera que sea finalizado por el Departamento de Salud Pública del estado de California muy pronto.

Si se aprueban las fases recién adaptadas, habrá tres nuevos niveles en la fase 1A. El Condado de San Bernardino está actualmente en el nivel 1 de la fase 1A (ver la tabla anterior para referencia), lo que significa que actualmente estamos distribuyendo dosis de vacunas a los trabajadores de atención médica de primera línea, a los primeros respondedores médicos (por ejemplo, paramédicos) y a los centros de diálisis; y pronto a las instalaciones de enfermería especializada y a otros residentes de atención a largo plazo.

Durante dos semanas hemos traído con éxito vacunas Pfizer-BioNTech y Moderna a los hospitales y centros médicos de nuestro condado, así como EMT y paramédicos”, dijo el director de salud pública del condado, Corwin Porter. “Ahora estamos trabajando con Walgreens y CVS Pharmacy para entregar vacunas a otros grupos incluidos en esta fase, específicamente al personal y residentes en instalaciones de enfermería especializada y otras residencias de cuidados a largo plazo”.

El Condado espera completar la Fase 1A, Nivel 1 a mediados de enero y pasar al siguiente Nivel.

El nivel 2 de la Fase 1A incluirá a aquellos que reciben atención intermedia y de apoyo; atención médica en el hogar y servicios de apoyo en el hogar; trabajadores de salud comunitaria (incluidas las promotoras); personal de salud pública; clínicas de atención primaria y centros de salud; clínicas de centros correccionales; y clínicas de atención urgente.

El nivel 3 de la Fase 1B incluirá clínicas especializadas; trabajadores de laboratorio; clínicas de salud dental/oral; y el personal de farmacia.

Pasando a la fase 1B, hay dos niveles. En el nivel 1 de la fase 1B, las dosis de la vacuna se administrarán a los trabajadores esenciales de primera línea en lugares que sean médicos, como los sectores de la alimentación y la agricultura; los maestros y el personal de apoyo; los servicios de emergencia como la policía y los bomberos; los trabajadores del cuidado de niños; los trabajadores agrícolas; y cualquier ciudadano mayor de 75 años.

En el nivel 2 de la fase 1B, la vacuna será administrará a personas mayores de 65 años con factores de alto riesgo; a personas sin hogar; a presos en cárceles y prisiones; y a trabajadores esenciales en los sectores de transporte, logística, fabricación crítica, industrial, residencial y comercial.

Se espera que la identificación de los receptores de la fase 1C esté finalizada durante las próximas semanas. Es probable que incluyan a personas de 16-64 años con afecciones médicas subyacentes, así como a trabajadores de otras industrias esenciales. Esto permitirá la fase 2 de la distribución de la vacunación para las personas mayores de 16 años no incluidas en las fases anteriores.

En este video In this video, los paramédicos de Redlands y el departamento de Incendio del Condado de San Bernardino comparten su experiencia de vacunación

Los Paramédicos del Condado y EMT comienzan a recibir la vacuna COVID-19

Actualmente, el Condado de San Bernardino se encuentra en la Fase 1A de distribución de vacunas. Las vacunas se administran sin costo. El público puede seguir las fases del lanzamiento de la vacunación en nuestro sitio web en sbcovid19.com/vaccine.

El lanzamiento se ha realizado sin problemas en el condado de San Bernardino, yendo primero a los trabajadores de atención médica de primera línea, a las personas en instalaciones de enfermería especializada y a los centros de atención a largo plazo, así como a las personas que responden por primera vez a la atención médica, como los paramédicos  as well as medical first responders such as paramedics y EMT.

El condado ha entregado más de 33,000 dosis de la vacuna hasta ahora que recibimos del estado y los suministros para implementar las vacunas han venido con las vacunas. El Condado está preparado para conducir sitios de punto de dispensación en múltiples lugares y estaremos coordinando con nuestras ciudades, pueblos y socios comunitarios para llegar a todas las comunidades.

Sitios de pruebas amplían las horas para acomodar a los residentes del condado

Los residentes del condado han respondido de manera impresionante a las peticiones de los funcionarios de hacerse la prueba para el COVID-19, ya que solo en diciembre se realizaron más de 465,000 pruebas.

La demanda de pruebas sigue siendo fuerte, con citas que se llenan constantemente con dos o tres días de anticipación. En respuesta, varias de las instalaciones de pruebas del Condado están ampliando las horas hasta las 8 p.m. para acomodar a los residentes y se espera que mantengan estas horas extendidas hasta el 8 de enero. Puede encontrar una lista de sitios de pruebas y horarios extendidos aquí. A list of testing sites and extended hours can be found here.

“Estamos orgullosos de cómo los residentes del condado han respondido a nuestras solicitudes de hacerse las pruebas”, dijo el presidente de la Junta de supervisores del condado, Curt Hagman, quien señaló que las cifras de las pruebas del condado han superado recientemente los requisitos estatales. “Seguimos animando a todos, incluidos los que no tienen síntomas, a que programen una cita para hacerse la prueba”.

Hagman notó que mientras muchas de las ubicaciones de pruebas del condado siguen aceptando visitas sin citas,  aquellos sin citas por lo general están teniendo que esperar hasta 90 minutos o más para recibir una prueba.

“Hacerse la prueba no es doloroso y es gratuito”, dijo Hagman, “y para aquellos con cita, es rápido, fácil y conveniente. Así que por favor, programe una cita tan pronto como le sea posible.”

Project Roomkey se Transiciona al programa Moving Forward

Una asociación entre el Condado, Chance Project and Knowledge and Education for Your Success (KEYS) se formó para proporcionar asistencia a aquellos que experimentan la falta de hogar que están en alto riesgo para COVID-19. El Programa Moving Forward traslada a los individuos de Project Roomkey, una iniciativa estatal para proporcionar un lugar seguro para que las personas sin hogar se aíslen durante el COVID-19, a una vivienda provisional y permanente.

Las personas que reciben asistencia a través de Project Roomkey y Moving Forward incluyen personas sin hogar mayores de 65 años, aquellas que pueden tener condiciones médicas y mujeres embarazadas. Hasta la fecha, Moving Forward ha ayudado a casi 50 personas a salir de la falta de hogar.

“Este esfuerzo de colaboración ha sido fundamental para garantizar la salud y la seguridad de algunos de los residentes más vulnerables del condado”, dijo CaSonya Thomas, oficial ejecutivo adjunto de Servicios Humanos del Condado. “Moving Forward se dedica a abordar las necesidades únicas de las personas sin hogar en nuestra región a través de la coordinación de los esfuerzos del condado, la comunidad y local para proporcionar servicios que resultarán en soluciones que cambiarán la vida y soluciones a largo plazo “.

Moving Forward proporciona apoyo en forma de servicios de extensión, acceso a la vivienda y servicios de navegación, y gestión integral de casos. El objetivo del programa es conectar rápidamente a las personas y familias con la vivienda y los servicios.

“Estamos agradecidos por la asociación con Los Servicios Humanos del Condado de San Bernardino y nuestros socios en este esfuerzo, incluyendo Housing for All, Keys, Inland Housing Solutions, Knock Knock Angels, el Departamento de Envejecimiento y Servicios para Adultos del Condado, y todos los otros socios comunitarios dedicados”, dijo Ron Griffin, CEO del Proyecto Chance. “Todos ellos fueron parte de la transición de los residentes del condado en crisis de vivienda a vivienda permanente durante los próximos años”.

Para obtener más información sobre el programa Moving Forward, vea el vídeo adjunto view the attached video, o envíe un correo electrónico a info@thechanceproject.org

Actualización del Sheriff sobre presos y empleados que han resultado positivos de COVID-19

Un total de 803 presos en las cárceles del condado han resultado positivos de COVID-19. Muchos de los presos sólo están experimentando síntomas menores del virus. Los presos infectados están aislados, siendo vigilados las 24 horas del día y reciben tratamiento médico. Un total de 723 presos se han recuperado de la enfermedad.

Un total de 739 empleados del departamento han resultado positivos de COVID-19 y se autoaislan en casa; 587 empleados se han recuperado del virus. Se espera que los otros empleados regresen a trabajar en las próximas semanas. No se sabe cuándo o dónde se infectaron los empleados con el virus. El departamento sigue alentando a todos los miembros del departamento a que presten atención a las advertencias de los funcionarios de salud.

Estadísticas más recientes

193,214 Casos Confirmados        (un 1.1% desde el día anterior)
1,442 Muertes                                  (un 0.3% desde el día anterior)
1,644,695 Pruebas                          (un 0.5% desde el día anterior)

Capacidad actual de las unidades de cuidados intensivos (UCI) del sur de California: 0 % (objetivo para levantar el pedido de permanencia en casa del estado: el 15 %)

Para obtener más estadísticas del Tablero de Vigilancia COVID-19, haga clic en la pestaña de escritorio o móvil en sbcovid19.com sitio web del Condado.

Para toda la información relacionada con COVID-19, incluyendo estadísticas de casos, preguntas frecuentes, pautas y recursos, visite la página web de COVID-19 del Condado en http://sbcovid19.com/.  Los residentes del Condado de San Bernardino también pueden llamar a la línea de ayuda COVID-19 al (909) 387-3911 para obtener información general y recursos sobre el virus. La línea telefónica NO es para llamadas médicas y está disponible de lunes a viernes, de 9 a.m. a 5 p.m. Si tiene preguntas sobre servicios sociales, llame al 211.

December 23, 2020 Update

The County Update publishes each Wednesday and also as needed, to share important news and resources in our battle against COVID-19 and to keep our economy running. We remain here for you. #SBCountyTogether

For latest COVID-19 statistics and important links, scroll to the bottom of today’s Update

In today’s Update:

  • County making progress delivering vaccines to all frontline health care workers
  • Getting help for your illness or injury during the pandemic
  • Public Health Officer shares video message on Moderna
  • Sheriff COVID-19 cases update

              Happy Holidays to the residents and businesses of San Bernardino County!

 County Making Steady Progress in Vaccinating Frontline Health Care Workers

San Bernardino County is progressing smoothly in its efforts to widely administer FDA-approved COVID-19 vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, with an initial focus on high-risk health workers treating patients on the front lines of the pandemic

This video shows just a small sampling of the many health care workers receiving the vaccines in medical centers throughout the county.

“We have already provided initial doses to literally thousands of health care workers throughout the county,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman. “Our top priority is getting the vaccines to doctors, nurses, paramedics, and our other heroes working in hospitals and emergency medical facilities. We expect virtually all of our 112,000 health care providers to receive their first doses within the next few weeks.”

Both vaccines require two doses, 21 days apart for the Pfizer vaccine and 28 days for Moderna, and both have shown to be at least 94% effective at preventing symptomatic cases.

“We are receiving additional supplies of the vaccines every week, and have established a sophisticated system to ensure doses are properly stored and distributed to our partners as quickly and as efficiently as possible,” said Hagman.

The following hospitals and medical centers are vaccinating frontline health care workers:

Arrowhead Regional Medical Center

Ballard Rehabilitation Hospital

Barstow Community Hospital

Bear Valley Medical Center

Canyon Ridge Hospital

Kindred Hospital (Ontario, Rancho)

Chino Valley Medical Center

Colorado River Medical Center

Community Hospital of San Bernardino

Desert Valley Hospital

Hi-Desert Medical Center

Kaiser Permanente (Fontana, Ontario)

Loma Linda Medical Center

Loma Linda University Behavioral Health Medical Center

Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital

Montclair Hospital Medical Center

Mountains Community Hospital

Patton State Hospital

Redlands Community Hospital

San Antonio Regional Hospital

St. Bernardine Medical Center

St. Mary Medical Center – Apple Valley

Totally Kids Rehabilitation Hospital

Victor Valley Global Medical Center

Getting Help for Your Illness or Injury during the Pandemic

With the coronavirus tightening its grip on the hospital and emergency medical systems, people are often left wondering how to best seek treatment when they become sick or injured. For many, all they know are ambulances and hospital emergency departments. However, those last-resort options represent but a fraction of the full health care system available to the public.

“San Bernardino is similar to other counties throughout the region in its approach to providing health care to its residents and visitors,” said Tom Marshall, Deputy Chief of the San Bernardino County Fire Protection District and Incident Commander of San Bernardino County All-Hazard Incident Management Team #1 (XBO IMT).  Primary care providers, physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants are the front line for life-long health care.

“These providers develop relationships with their patients through annual check-ups and management of chronic health conditions. They are also an excellent source for emerging illnesses or minor injuries,” Marshall said. Primary care providers represent the highest concentration of health care providers in the system.

When illnesses or injuries occur outside of normal business hours (or if a patient is traveling), urgent care facilities and health clinics are staffed and equipped to handle these same illnesses and often provide advanced care such as X-rays and wound treatment. While not as robust as the primary care system, the extended hours of urgent care facilities, many of which are open 24 hours a day, are a strong support network for the primary care providers. There are more urgent care beds and providers than emergency department beds in the region.

When your best choice is the ER

For patients with life-threatening illnesses or complex injuries, the emergency department is the destination of choice. This subset of patients can require the assistance of numerous health care workers. Treating one seriously ill or badly injured patient often involves multiple nurses and physicians.  Representing the smallest component of the health care system, the emergency department is often the first to be overwhelmed with patients who can treated elsewhere, resulting in wait times that can last several hours.

When the intensive care unit of a hospital is at capacity, the overflow goes to the emergency department (ED) due to the training and capabilities of the ED staff. This also creates a shortage of available beds in the ED. ICU patients held in the ED often require the dedication of an ED nurse who would otherwise be able to manage three patients at once. This lack of beds and staffing creates a backup in the system that cannot be undone as additional patients continue to arrive by ambulance and private vehicle.

Ambulances that arrive at an emergency department with no open beds are forced to wait. This decreases the number of ambulances available for additional 911 calls.

“Many agencies have a standard of arriving on scene of a 911 call in under 10 minutes,” said Nathan Cooke, deputy chief of the Chino Valley Fire District and Deputy Incident Commander of the XBO IMT. “However, the effects of a hospital system stretched to its limits creates a trickle-down effect that threatens the stability of the 911 emergency medical system.”

Consider alternative options

We can find the best care for ourselves and our loved ones by utilizing the full capacity of the health care system. Contact your primary medical provider or nurse advice line for routine medical concerns or to discuss your symptoms. If it’s an urgent situation such as the need for a prescription refill or a minor laceration that may need to be sutured, urgent cares stand ready to help.

Recently, paramedics and EMT’s in San Bernardino County who respond to 911 calls and determine that a patient is stable and not suffering from any life-threatening or life disabling event began educating and referring patients into these alternate avenues of the healthcare system.

“This has resulted in the mutual benefits of ensuring patients receive appropriate care for their current complaint, decreasing the workload of the emergency departments and keeping ambulances available for the critically ill and injured,” Chief Marshall said.

Calling 911 for advice is never appropriate nor shall call-takers provide advice during the call. Seeking ambulance transport to an emergency department for a COVID test or in hopes of receiving the COVID vaccine is likewise inappropriate and serves only to further stress a system that is at its limit.

No one wants to be sick, especially around the holiday season.  With the triple threat of colds, flu, and COVID-19, your safest actions remain frequent hand washing, sanitizing commonly touched surfaces, limiting contact with others to essential activities, and wearing a mask when social distancing cannot be maintained. We are all in this together. Help us help you.

For more information and current recommendations, please go to www.sbcovid19.gov.

The XBO IMT is an “All-Hazard” incident management team comprised of members from fire agencies throughout San Bernardino County along with the San Bernardino County Sheriff.  Tasked with providing on-scene incident management support during incidents or events that exceed a jurisdiction’s or agency’s capability or capacity, XBO IMT applies its knowledge and expertise to support large fires that extend beyond the initial attack phase, mass gathering events such as major sports events and concerts, and mass casualty incidents. Incident management teams provide the five functions of Command, Operations, Planning, Logistics and Finance and operate under a delegation of authority from the local jurisdiction.

County Public Health Officer Shares Importance of Moderna Vaccine

Dr. Michael Sequeira, public health officer for San Bernardino County, shared his personal views on the importance of the Moderna vaccine in this short video. He also gives some insights into the unique advantages of handling this vaccine.

Sheriff Update on Inmates and Employees Testing Positive for COVID-19

A total of 747 County jail inmates have tested positive for COVID-19. Many of the inmates are only experiencing minor symptoms of the virus. The infected inmates are in isolation, being monitored around the clock, and are being provided with medical treatment. A total of 651 inmates have recovered from the illness.

A total of 686 department employees have tested positive for COVID-19 and are self-isolating at home; 489 employees have recovered from the virus. Other employees are expected to return to work in the next few weeks. It is unknown when or where the employees were infected with the virus. The department continues to encourage all department members to heed the warnings of health officials.

Latest Stats

170,855 Confirmed Cases             (up 1.5% from the previous day)
1,407 Deaths                                     (up 1.4% from the previous day)
1,526,935 Tests                                (up 1.5% from the previous day)

Current Southern California ICU Capacity: 0% (Goal to lift State Stay-at-Home Order: 15%)

For more statistics from the COVID-19 Surveillance Dashboard, click the desktop or mobile tab on the County’s sbcovid19.com website.

For all COVID-19 related information, including case statistics, FAQs, guidelines and resources, visit the County’s COVID-19 webpage at http://sbcovid19.com/.  Residents of San Bernardino County may also call the COVID-19 helpline at (909) 387-3911 for general information and resources about the virus. The phone line is NOT for medical calls and is available Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. If you have questions about social services, please call 211.

Actualización del 23 de diciembre de 2020

La Actualización del Condado se publica una vez a la semana los miércoles, y también según sea necesario, con el fin de compartir noticias y recursos importantes en nuestra batalla contra COVID-19. Nos quedamos aquí para ti. #SBCountyTogether

Para las estadísticas más recientes y enlaces importantes, desplácese hasta la parte inferior de la actualización de hoy.

En la actualización de hoy:

  • El condado progresa en la administración de vacunas a todos los trabajadores de la salud de primera línea
  • Obtener ayuda para su enfermedad o lesión durante la pandemia
  • Oficial de Salud Pública comparte video mensaje en Moderna
  • Actualización de casos del Sheriff COVID-19

¡Felices fiestas a los residentes y negocios del condado de San Bernardino!

                                                                         

El Condado haciendo progresos constantes en la vacunación de los trabajadores de atención médica de primera línea

El condado de San Bernardino está progresando sin problemas en sus esfuerzos por administrar ampliamente las vacunas COVID-19 aprobadas por la FDA de Pfizer-BioNTech y Moderna, con un enfoque inicial en los trabajadores de salud de alto riesgo que tratan a los pacientes en la primera línea de la pandemia.

Este video muestra sólo una pequeña muestra de los muchos trabajadores de la salud que reciben las vacunas en centros médicos en todo el condado.

“Ya hemos proporcionado dosis iniciales a literalmente miles de trabajadores de la salud en todo el condado”, dijo el presidente de la Junta de Supervisores, Curt Hagman. “Nuestra máxima prioridad es llevar las vacunas a médicos, enfermeras, paramédicos y a nuestros otros héroes que trabajan en hospitales e instalaciones médicas de emergencia. Esperamos que prácticamente todos nuestros 112.000 proveedores de atención médica reciban sus primeras dosis en las próximas semanas”.

Ambas vacunas requieren dos dosis, 21 días de diferencia para la vacuna Pfizer y 28 días para Moderna, y ambas han demostrado ser al menos un 94% eficaces para prevenir casos sintomáticos.

“Estamos recibiendo suministros adicionales de las vacunas cada semana, y hemos establecido un sistema sofisticado para garantizar que las dosis se almacenen y distribuyan adecuadamente a nuestros socios de la manera más rápida y eficiente posible”, dijo Hagman.

Los siguientes hospitales y centros médicos están vacunando a los trabajadores de la salud de primera línea:

Arrowhead Regional Medical Center

Ballard Rehabilitation Hospital

Barstow Community Hospital

Bear Valley Medical Center

Canyon Ridge Hospital

Kindred Hospital (Ontario, Rancho)

Chino Valley Medical Center

Colorado River Medical Center

Community Hospital of San Bernardino

Desert Valley Hospital

Hi-Desert Medical Center

Kaiser Permanente (Fontana, Ontario)

Loma Linda Medical Center

Loma Linda University Behavioral Health Medical Center

Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital

Montclair Hospital Medical Center

Mountains Community Hospital

Patton State Hospital

Redlands Community Hospital

San Antonio Regional Hospital

St. Bernardine Medical Center

St. Mary Medical Center – Apple Valley

Totally Kids Rehabilitation Hospital

Victor Valley Global Medical Center

Obtener ayuda para su enfermedad o lesión durante la pandemia

Con el coronavirus apretando su control sobre el hospital y los sistemas médicos de emergencia, las personas a menudo se quedan preguntándose cómo buscar mejor tratamiento cuando se enferman o se lesionan. Para muchos, todo lo que saben son ambulancias y departamentos de emergencia de hospitales. Sin embargo, esas opciones de último recurso representan sólo una fracción del sistema completo de atención médica disponible para el público.

“San Bernardino es similar a otros condados de la región en su enfoque para proporcionar atención médica a sus residentes y visitantes”, dijo Tom Marshall, Jefe Adjunto del Distrito de Protección contra Incendios del Condado de San Bernardino y Comandante de Incidentes del Condado de San Bernardino #1 (XBO IMT).  Los proveedores de atención primaria, los médicos, los profesionales de enfermería y los asistentes médicos son la primera línea para la atención médica de por vida.

“Estos proveedores desarrollan relaciones con sus pacientes a través de chequeos anuales y el manejo de enfermedades crónicas. También son una excelente fuente de enfermedades emergentes o lesiones menores”, dijo Marshall. Los proveedores de atención primaria representan la concentración más alta de proveedores de atención médica en el sistema.

Cuando las enfermedades o lesiones ocurren fuera del horario comercial normal (o si un paciente está viajando), los centros de atención de urgencia y las clínicas de salud están dotados de personal y están equipados para manejar estas mismas enfermedades y a menudo proporcionan atención avanzada como radiografías y tratamiento de heridas. Aunque no son tan sólidas como el sistema de atención primaria, las horas extendidas de los centros de atención urgente, muchas de las cuales están abiertas las 24 horas del día, son una sólida red de apoyo para los proveedores de atención primaria. Hay más camas y proveedores de atención urgente que camas en las salas de emergencias en la región.

Cuando su mejor opción es la Sala de Emergencias

Para pacientes con enfermedades potencialmente mortales o lesiones complejas, el departamento de emergencias es el destino de elección. Este subconjunto de pacientes puede requerir la asistencia de numerosos trabajadores de la salud. Tratar a un paciente gravemente enfermo o gravemente lesionado a menudo involucra a múltiples enfermeras y médicos.  Representando el componente más pequeño del sistema de atención médica, el departamento de emergencias es a menudo el primero en ser abrumado con los pacientes que pueden tratar en otro lugar, lo que resulta en tiempos de espera que pueden durar varias horas.

Cuando la unidad de cuidados intensivos de un hospital está en capacidad, el desbordamiento va al departamento de emergencias (ED) debido a la capacitación y las capacidades del personal del ED. Esto también crea una escasez de camas disponibles en la ED. Los pacientes de la UCI que se encuentran en la ED a menudo requieren la dedicación de una enfermera de ED que de otro modo sería capaz de manejar a tres pacientes a la vez. Esta falta de camas y personal crea una copia de seguridad en el sistema que no se puede deshacer a medida que los pacientes adicionales continúan llegando en ambulancia y vehículo privado.

Las ambulancias que llegan a un servicio de urgencias sin camas abiertas se ven obligadas a esperar. Esto disminuye el número de ambulancias disponibles para llamadas adicionales al 911.

“Muchas agencias tienen un estándar para llegar a la escena de una llamada al 911 en menos de 10 minutos”, dijo Nathan Cooke, subjefe del Distrito de Bomberos del Valle de Chino y Comandante Adjunto de Incidentes de la XBO IMT. “Sin embargo, los efectos de un sistema hospitalario estirados hasta sus límites crean un efecto de goteo que amenaza la estabilidad del sistema médico de emergencia 911”.

Considere opciones alternativas

Podemos encontrar la mejor atención para nosotros y nuestros seres queridos utilizando toda la capacidad del sistema de atención médica. Comuníquese con su proveedor médico primario o línea de asesoramiento de enfermeras para problemas médicos de rutina o para analizar sus síntomas. Si se trata de una situación urgente, como la necesidad de una recarga de recetas o una laceración menor que puede necesitar ser suturada, las atencións urgentes están listas para ayudar.

Recientemente, los paramédicos y EMT en el condado de San Bernardino que responden a las llamadas al 911 y determinan que un paciente está estable y no sufre ningún evento potencialmente mortal o de inhabilitación para la vida comenzó a educar y derivar a los pacientes en estas vías alternativas del sistema de salud.

“Esto ha dado lugar a los beneficios mutuos de garantizar que los pacientes reciban la atención adecuada para su queja actual, disminuyendo la carga de trabajo de los servicios de emergencia y manteniendo las ambulancias disponibles para los enfermos críticos y heridos”, dijo el Jefe Adjunto Marshall.

Llamar al 911 para recibir asesoramiento nunca es apropiado ni los que llaman proporcionarán consejos durante la llamada. Buscar transporte en ambulancia a un servicio de urgencias para una prueba COVID o con la esperanza de recibir la vacuna COVID es igualmente inapropiado y sólo sirve para enfatizar aún más un sistema que está en su límite.

Nadie quiere estar enfermo, especialmente durante la temporada de vacaciones.  Con la triple amenaza de resfriados, gripe y COVID-19, sus acciones más seguras siguen siendo el lavado frecuente de manos, desinfectando las superficies comúnmente tocadas, limitando el contacto con los demás a actividades esenciales y usando una cobertua facial cuando no se puede mantener el distanciamiento social. Estamos todos juntos en esto. Ayúdanos a ayudarte.

Oficial de Salud Pública del Condado comparte la importancia de la vacuna Moderna

El Dr. Michael Sequeira, oficial de salud pública del Condado de San Bernardino, compartió sus puntos de vista personales sobre la importancia de la vacuna Moderna en este breve video. También da algunas ideas sobre las ventajas únicas de manejar esta vacuna.

Actualización del Sheriff sobre presos y empleados que dan positivo para COVID-19

Un total de 747 presos del condado han dado positivo por COVID-19. Muchos de los presos sólo están experimentando síntomas menores del virus. Los presos infectados están aislados, siendo monitoreados durante todo el día, y están recibiendo tratamiento médico. Un total de 651 presos se han recuperado de la enfermedad.

Un total de 686 empleados del departamento han dado positivo en COVID-19 y se autoaislan en casa; 489 empleados se han recuperado del virus. Se espera que otros empleados vuelvan al trabajo en las próximas semanas. Se desconoce cuándo o dónde los empleados fueron infectados con el virus. El departamento sigue animando a todos los miembros del departamento a que atened las advertencias de los funcionarios de salud.

Estadísticas más recientes

170,855 Casos Confirmados         (un 1,5% más del día anterior)

1,407 Muertes                                 (un 1,4% más del día anterior)

1,526,935 Probados                       (un 1,5% más del día anterior)

Capacidad actual de la UCI del sur de California: 0% (Objetivo de levantar la orden de estadía en el hogar del estado: 15%)

Para obtener más estadísticas del Panel de Vigilancia COVID-19, haga clic en la pestaña de escritorio o móvil en el sbcovid19.com sitio web del Condado.

Para toda la información relacionada con COVID-19, incluyendo estadísticas de casos, preguntas frecuentes, pautas y recursos, visite la página web de COVID-19 del Condado en http://sbcovid19.com/.  Los residentes del Condado de San Bernardino también pueden llamar a la línea de ayuda COVID-19 al (909) 387-3911 para obtener información general y recursos sobre el virus. La línea telefónica NO es para llamadas médicas y está disponible de lunes a viernes, de 9 a.m. a 5 p.m. Si tiene preguntas sobre servicios sociales, llame al 211.

 

December 21, 2020 Update – Special Edition

The County Update publishes each Wednesday and also as needed, to share important news and resources in our battle against COVID-19 and to keep our economy running. We remain here for you. #SBCountyTogether

For latest COVID-19 statistics and important links, scroll to the bottom of today’s Update

In today’s Update:

  • County receives shipment of Moderna vaccine

Moderna Vaccine Shipped to San Bernardino County

San Bernardino County was among the first in the state today to receive the recently approved Moderna vaccine. The 21,650 doses received by the County today are being shipped to health care partners throughout the county and will be administered to frontline health care workers beginning immediately.

Moderna joins Pfizer as the only vaccines approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use to fight COVID-19. Thousands of health care professionals in the county have received the vaccine, and with more shipments expected weekly, it is the hope of public health officials that there will be enough vaccines for all frontline hospital workers by end of this week.

“For several months, San Bernardino County has been working aggressively with the state and our countywide health system to craft a plan for shipping, storage and distribution of vaccines once they became available,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman. “This preparation put us in an excellent position to get doses to these frontline heroes. It is our hope that we will have given the first dose to all of our frontline health care workers by the first or second week of January.”

Both vaccines require two doses, 21 days apart for the Pfizer vaccine and 28 days for Moderna, and both have shown to be at least 94% effective at preventing symptomatic cases.

Latest Stats

163,945 Confirmed Cases             (up 4% from the previous day)
1,375 Deaths                                     (up 3.6% from the previous day)
1,494,409 Tests                                (up 2.7% from the previous day)

Current Southern California ICU Capacity: 0% (Goal to lift State Stay-at-Home Order: 15%)

For more statistics from the COVID-19 Surveillance Dashboard, click the desktop or mobile tab on the County’s sbcovid19.com website.

For all COVID-19 related information, including case statistics, FAQs, guidelines and resources, visit the County’s COVID-19 webpage at http://sbcovid19.com/.  Residents of San Bernardino County may also call the COVID-19 helpline at (909) 387-3911 for general information and resources about the virus. The phone line is NOT for medical calls and is available Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. If you have questions about social services, please call 211.

Actualización del 21 de diciembre de 2020

Edición especial

La Actualización del Condado se publica una vez a la semana los miércoles, y también según sea necesario, con el fin de compartir noticias y recursos importantes en nuestra batalla contra COVID-19. Nos quedamos aquí para ti. #SBCountyTogether

Para las estadísticas más recientes y enlaces importantes, desplácese hasta la parte inferior de la actualización de hoy.

En la actualización de hoy:

  • El condado recibe envío de la vacuna Moderna

Vacuna Moderna enviada al condado de San Bernardino

El condado de San Bernardino fue uno de los primeros en el estado hoy en recibir la vacuna Moderna recientemente aprobada. Las 21,650 dosis recibidas por el Condado hoy en día están siendo enviadas a socios de atención médica en todo el condado y serán administradas a los trabajadores de atención médica de primera línea a partir de inmediato.

Moderna se une a Pfizer como las únicas vacunas aprobadas por la Administración de Alimentos y Medicamentos para su uso para luchar contra COVID-19. Miles de profesionales de la salud en el condado han recibido la vacuna, y con más envíos esperados semanalmente, es la esperanza de los funcionarios de salud pública que habrá suficientes vacunas para todos los trabajadores de los hospitales de primera línea para finales de esta semana.

“Durante varios meses, el Condado de San Bernardino ha estado trabajando agresivamente con el estado y nuestro sistema de salud en todo el condado para elaborar un plan para el envío, almacenamiento y distribución de vacunas una vez que estén disponibles”, dijo el presidente de la Junta de Supervisores, Curt Hagman. “Esta preparación nos puso en una excelente posición para conseguir dosis a estos héroes de primera línea. Esperamos que hayamos dado la primera dosis a todos nuestros trabajadores sanitarios de primera línea antes de la primera o segunda semana de enero”.

Ambas vacunas requieren dos dosis, 21 días de diferencia para la vacuna Pfizer y 28 días para Moderna, y ambas han demostrado ser al menos un 94% eficaces para prevenir casos sintomáticos.

Estadísticas más recientes

163,945 Casos Confirmados      (un 4 % más del día anterior)

1,375 Muertes                           (un 3,6% más del día anterior)

1,494,409 Probados                  (un 2,7% más del día anterior)

Capacidad actual de la UCI del sur de California: 0% (Objetivo de levantar el orden de estadía en el hogar del estado: 15%)

Para obtener más estadísticas del Tablero de Vigilancia COVID-19, haga clic en la pestaña de escritorio o móvil en sbcovid19.com sitio web del Condado.

Para toda la información relacionada con COVID-19, incluyendo estadísticas de casos, preguntas frecuentes, pautas y recursos, visite la página web de COVID-19 del Condado en http://sbcovid19.com/.  Los residentes del Condado de San Bernardino también pueden llamar a la línea de ayuda COVID-19 al (909) 387-3911 para obtener información general y recursos sobre el virus. La línea telefónica NO es para llamadas médicas y está disponible de lunes a viernes, de 9 a.m. a 5 p.m. Si tiene preguntas sobre servicios sociales, llame al 211.

 

 

 

December 16, 2020 Update

The County Update publishes each Wednesday and also as needed, to share important news and resources in our battle against COVID-19 and to keep our economy running. We remain here for you. #SBCountyTogether

For latest COVID-19 statistics and important links, scroll to the bottom of today’s Update

In today’s Update:

  • First vaccines now going to County healthcare workers
  • ‘Share the Gift of Safety’ to help with sobering situation
  • Videos available for social sharing
  • Sheriff COVID-19 cases update

Frontline Healthcare Workers are First to Receive Pfizer Vaccine

County launches webpage for up-to-date vaccine information

Frontline healthcare workers at Arrowhead Regional Medical Center today became the first people in the Inland Empire to be administered the first of two doses of the COVID-19 vaccine from Pfizer-BioNTech. This morning, San Bernardino County received its first shipment of the vaccines, which are anticipated to be disbursed to 19 hospitals within the county by the end of the day.

Pfizer is shipping three million doses in this first wave, of which California is initially receiving 327,000 doses; 15,600 have arrived in San Bernardino County. Subsequent shipments of the vaccine are expected to continue arriving on a weekly basis, and a second vaccine from Moderna is only days away from FDA approval.

The County has established the SB County Vaccination Task Force and produced a COVID-19 Standard Operating Guide to ensure our ability to distribute the vaccine as efficiently and effectively as possible. The guide largely follows guidelines established by the CDC, the California Department of Public Health and the County Department of Public Health.

San Bernardino County has launched a vaccine-specific information webpage that shares up-to-date information where we are in the different phases of the vaccine distribution, as well as critical FAQs and other resource links.

Because the initial batches of doses are being rationed, the vaccine is being initially administered to front-line healthcare personnel, followed by residents and staff of long-term care and skilled nursing facilities. First responders will also be among the first people in the county to receive the vaccine.

In Phase 2, distribution of the vaccine will be expanded to include K-12 teachers and staff, childcare workers, critical workers in essential and high-risk industries, residents with comorbidity/underlying conditions, staff and residents of group facilities, and older adults not included in Phase 1.  Phase 3 adds young adults, children and workers in industries and occupations not already included, and Phase 4 includes everyone not already inoculated.

“We have a plan in place, and we will move quickly to protect our most at-risk and vulnerable residents,” said Board of Supervisor Chairman Curt Hagman. “That includes making sure we handle and store the vaccine properly,” he added, noting that the Pfizer vaccine must be stored at -80 degree Celsius (-120 Fahrenheit), requiring special facilities and materials like dry ice (frozen CO2).

“We still face challenges from this virus, and will continue dealing with infections and illness for several weeks and even months. However, this is a crucial development that gives us hope for the future, and we will work tirelessly to ensure every county resident has a chance to get vaccinated at the earliest possible date,” Hagman said.

Share the Gift of Safety this Season

We hate saying it as much as you hate hearing it: but despite the inconvenience and fatigue, there is no skirting around the fact that every County resident must do all we can to avoid catching, and spreading, COVID-19 this holiday season.

We understand your frustration. All of us truly want to spend the holidays with family and friends. Unfortunately, there is no “fake news” in the headlines – we’re in the middle of a very alarming spike in COVID-19 cases, which county data predominantly attributes to social gatherings.

Our hospital numbers tell the real story…and it’s a distressing one.

San Bernardino County hospitals are running out of beds overall and have hit capacity in their intensive care units (ICUs). Put another way, at the current time, our hospitals have no more ICU beds available. And while we previously might have gained assistance from nearby counties, today their ICU situation is as difficult as ours. The current shortage of hospital beds not only affects COVID-19 patients, but others who require serious medical attention.

Intensifying our challenge is the fact that our medical personnel have been working exhaustive hours and they are nearing their breaking points. While their dedication is inspiring, their abilities are not limitless.

Unfortunately, there is little any of us can do to help hospital staff and their patients – but what we can do is take every precaution possible to ensure we stay healthy and avoid spreading the virus to others. So please avoid gatherings with those outside your immediate family. Maintain social distancing. Wear a mask whenever you’re in close proximity to others. And wash your hands thoroughly and regularly.

We safe and be well this holiday season. Thank you.

Residents Encouraged to Share “Gift of Safety” Videos on Personal Social Pages

The County has produced two 30-second videos that feature different faces of our community and healthcare system reminding us of the importance of staying vigilant this holiday season. Even though vaccines are being rolled out, we still have to do what it takes to not overwhelm our hospital system.

Each of the videos can be found on YouTube and the healthcare professionals in the County of San Bernardino are asking residents to share the videos on their own personal social media pages. Each video features both English and Spanish speakers, with captions as designated.
Gift of Safety #1 with English captions: https://youtu.be/yMepCgcw3x0

Regalo de la Seguridad #1 with Spanish captions: https://youtu.be/HwJy90Gz_IU

Gift of Safety #2 with English captions: https://youtu.be/uVv9EtIIa80

Regalo de la Seguridad #2 with Spanish captions: https://youtu.be/7vPtOCA2Jdc

Sheriff Update on Inmates and Employees Testing Positive for COVID-19

A total of 687 County jail inmates have tested positive for COVID-19. Many of the inmates are only experiencing minor symptoms of the virus. The infected inmates are in isolation, being monitored around the clock, and are being provided with medical treatment. A total of 580 inmates have recovered from the illness.

A total of 584 department employees have tested positive for COVID-19 and are self-isolating at home; 386 employees have recovered from the virus. Other employees are expected to return to work in the next few weeks. It is unknown when or where the employees were infected with the virus. The department continues to encourage all department members to heed the warnings of health officials.

Latest Stats

135.072 Confirmed Cases             (up 4.3% from the previous day)
1,304 Deaths                                     (up 5.1% from the previous day)
1,383,914 Tests                                (up 1.6% from the previous day)

Current Southern California ICU Capacity: 9% (Goal to lift State Stay-at-Home Order: 15%)

For more statistics from the COVID-19 Surveillance Dashboard, click the desktop or mobile tab on the County’s sbcovid19.com website.

For all COVID-19 related information, including case statistics, FAQs, guidelines and resources, visit the County’s COVID-19 webpage at http://sbcovid19.com/.  Residents of San Bernardino County may also call the COVID-19 helpline at (909) 387-3911 for general information and resources about the virus. The phone line is NOT for medical calls and is available Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. If you have questions about social services, please call 211.

Actualización del 9 de diciembre de 2020

La Actualización del Condado publicará una vez a la semana, los miércoles y también según sea necesario, con el fin de compartir noticias y recursos importantes en nuestra batalla contra COVID-19 y para mantener nuestra economía funcionando. Permanecemos aquí para usted. #SBCountyTogether

Para las estadísticas más recientes y enlaces importantes, desplácese hasta la parte inferior de la actualización de hoy.

En la actualización de hoy:

  • Las primeras vacunas serán disponibles a los Trabajadores Sanitarios del Condado
  • Comparta el Regalo de Seguridad’ para ayudar con la situación aleccionadora.
  • Videos disponibles para compartir en redes sociales
  • Actualización de casos de COVID-19 del Sheriff

La enfermera de UCI Sonya Harrell es la primera trabajadora sanitaria de primera línea en el condado de San Bernardino a recibir la vacuna COVID-19; administrada por Marcia Williams. Ambos trabajan en Arrowhead Regional Medical Center.

Los trabajadores sanitarios de primera línea son los primeros en recibir la vacuna Pfizer

El condado lanza una página web para obtener información actualizada sobre vacunas

Los trabajadores sanitarios de primera línea de Arrowhead Regional Medical Center fueron hoy las primeras personas en el Inland Empire que se administraron la primera de las dos dosis de la vacuna COVID-19 de Pfizer-BioNTech. Esta mañana, el condado de San Bernardino recibió su primer envío de las vacunas, que se esperan ser desembolsados a 19 hospitales dentro del condado al final del día.

Pfizer está enviando tres millones de dosis en esta primera ola, de los cuales California está recibiendo inicialmente 327.000 dosis; 15.600 han llegado al condado de San Bernardino. Se espera que los envíos posteriores de la vacuna continúen llegando semanalmente, y una segunda vacuna de Moderna está a solo unos días de la aprobación de la FDA.

El Condado ha establecido el Grupo de Trabajo de Vacunación del Condado de SB y ha producido una Guía Operativa Estándar COVID-19 para asegurar nuestra capacidad de distribuir la vacuna de la manera más eficiente y efectiva posible. La guía sigue en gran medida las pautas establecidas por los CDC, el Departamento de Salud Pública de California y el Departamento de Salud Pública del Condado.

El Condado de San Bernardino ha lanzado una página web de información específica de la vacuna vaccine-specific information webpage que comparte información actualizada donde estamos en las diferentes fases de la distribución de la vacuna, así como preguntas frecuentes críticas y otros enlaces de recursos.

Debido a que se están racionando los lotes iniciales de dosis, la vacuna se está administrando inicialmente al personal de atención médica de primera línea, seguido por los residentes y el personal de atención a largo plazo y centros de enfermería especializada. Los primeros respondedores también estarán entre las primeras personas en el condado en recibir la vacuna.

En la fase 2, la distribución de la vacuna se ampliará para incluir a maestros y personal de K-12, trabajadores de cuidado infantil, trabajadores críticos en industrias esenciales y de alto riesgo, residentes con comorbilidad/condiciones subyacentes, personal y residentes de instalaciones grupales, y adultos mayores no incluidos en la fase 1. La fase 3 añade adultos jóvenes, niños y trabajadores en industrias y ocupaciones que no están incluidas, y la fase 4 incluye a todos los que no han sido inoculados.

“Tenemos un plan en lugar, y nos moveremos rápidamente para proteger a nuestros residentes más vulnerables y en riesgo”, dijo el Presidente de la Junta de Supervisores, Curt Hagman. “Eso incluye asegurarnos de que manejemos y almacenemos la vacuna correctamente”, agregó, señalando que la vacuna Pfizer debe almacenarse a -80 grados Celsius (-120 Fahrenheit), lo que requiere instalaciones y materiales especiales como hielo seco (CO2 congelado).

“Todavía enfrentamos desafíos de este virus, y continuaremos lidiando con infecciones y enfermedades durante varias semanas e incluso meses. Sin embargo, este es un desarrollo crucial que nos da esperanza para el futuro, y trabajaremos incansablemente para asegurar que todos los residentes del condado tienen la oportunidad de vacunarse lo antes posible”, dijo Hagman.

Comparta el Regalo de Seguridad esta temporada
Odiemos decirlo tanto como odias escucharlo: pero a pesar de las molestias y la fatiga, no hay otro modo de decirlo menos que cada residente del condado debe hacer todo lo posible para evitar para evitar que usted contraiga COVID-19 y no contagie a otras personas esta temporada de vacaciones.

Entendemos su frustración. Todos nosotros realmente queremos pasar las vacaciones con la familia y amigos. Desafortunadamente, no hay “noticias falsas” en los titulares: estamos en medio de un pico muy alarmante en los casos COVID-19, que los datos del condado atribuyen predominantemente a las reuniones sociales.

Los números de nuestros hospitales cuentan la historia real… y es una historia angustiosa.

Los hospitales del condado de San Bernardino se están quedando sin camas en general y han alcanzado la capacidad en sus Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos (UCIs). Dicho de otra manera, en la actualidad, nuestros hospitales no tienen más camas de UCI disponibles. Y aunque anteriormente podríamos haber obtenido ayuda de los condados cercanos, hoy su situación en la UCI es tan difícil como la nuestra. La actual escasez de camas de hospital no solo afecta a los pacientes con COVID-19, sino a otros que requieren atención médica seria.

Intensificando nuestro desafío es el hecho de que nuestro personal médico ha estado trabajando horas exhaustivas y están acercándose a sus puntos de quiebre. Aunque su dedicación es inspiradora, sus habilidades no son ilimitadas.

Desafortunadamente, hay poco que cualquiera de nosotros puede hacer para ayudar al personal del hospital y a sus pacientes, pero lo que podemos hacer es tomar todas las precauciones posibles para garantizar que nos mantengamos saludables y evitar la propagación del virus a otros. Así que por favor evite las reuniones con los que están fuera de su familia inmediata. Mantener el distanciamiento social. Use una máscara siempre que esté cerca de los demás. Y lávese bien las manos frecuentemente.

Mantengase a salvo y cuídese esta temporada de vacaciones. Gracias.

Se anima a los residentes a compartir videos de “Regalo de seguridad” en las páginas sociales personales

El Condado ha producido dos videos de 30 segundos que presentan diferentes caras de nuestra comunidad y sistema de salud que nos recuerdan la importancia de permanecer vigilantes esta temporada navideña. A pesar de que se están aplicando vacunas, todavía tenemos que hacer lo que sea necesario para no abrumar nuestro sistema hospitalario.

Cada uno de los videos se puede encontrar en YouTube y los profesionales de la salud en el Condado de San Bernardino están pidiendole a los residentes que compartan los videos en sus propias páginas personales de redes sociales. Cada vídeo cuenta con hablantes de inglés y español, con subtítulos designados.

Gift of Safety #1 with English captions: https://youtu.be/yMepCgcw3x0

Regalo de la Seguridad #1 with Spanish captions: https://youtu.be/HwJy90Gz_IU

Gift of Safety #2 with English captions: https://youtu.be/uVv9EtIIa80

Regalo de la Seguridad #2 with Spanish captions: https://youtu.be/7vPtOCA2Jdc

Actualización del Sheriff sobre presos y empleados que han resultado positivos de COVID-19

Un total de 687 presos en las cárceles del condado han resultado positivos de COVID-19. Muchos de los presos sólo están experimentando síntomas menores del virus. Los presos infectados están aislados, siendo vigilados las 24 horas del día y reciben tratamiento médico. Un total de 518 presos se han recuperado de la enfermedad.

Un total de 584 empleados del departamento han resultado positivos de COVID-19 y se autoaislan en casa; 386 empleados se han recuperado del virus. Se espera que los otros empleados regresen a trabajar en las próximas semanas.

 Estadísticas más recientes

135,072 Casos Confirmados                        (un 4.3% desde el día anterior)
1,304 Muertes                                               (un 5.1% desde el día anterior)
1,383,914 Pruebas                                        (un 1.6% desde el día anterior)

Capacidad actual de las unidades de cuidados intensivos (UCI) del sur de California: 9 % (objetivo para levantar el pedido de permanencia en casa del estado: el 15 %)

Para obtener más estadísticas del Tablero de Vigilancia COVID-19, haga clic en la pestaña de escritorio o móvil en sbcovid19.com sitio web del Condado.

Para toda la información relacionada con COVID-19, incluyendo estadísticas de casos, preguntas frecuentes, pautas y recursos, visite la página web de COVID-19 del Condado en http://sbcovid19.com/.  Los residentes del Condado de San Bernardino también pueden llamar a la línea de ayuda COVID-19 al (909) 387-3911 para obtener información general y recursos sobre el virus. La línea telefónica NO es para llamadas médicas y está disponible de lunes a viernes, de 9 a.m. a 5 p.m. Si tiene preguntas sobre servicios sociales, llame al 211.

County petitions Supreme Court for local control of COVID-19 measures

San Bernardino County has filed an action directly in the California Supreme Court asking the court to find that the governor’s stay-at-home orders exceed the authority found in the California Emergency Services Act. The county seeks to exercise local control in response to the COVID-19 pandemic rather than be restrained by the state’s regional approach that treats San Bernardino County the same as significantly different counties such as Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and San Diego.

“The governor is not permitted to act as both the executive and legislative branch for nine months under the California Emergency Services Act,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman. “If it is concluded that the act allows him to do so, the act is unconstitutional as it permits the delegation of the Legislature’s powers to the executive branch in violation of the California Constitution.”

San Bernardino County has worked tirelessly on behalf of county residents and businesses urging the state to recognize that the county’s size and geographic diversity should allow for fewer restrictions in communities with lower COVID-19 metrics than the county as a whole.

“The governor declared that the state’s approach would be based on science and data, but the state has not produced science or data that suggest the restrictions he has imposed would address the current trajectory of the pandemic in San Bernardino County,” said former Supervisor Josie Gonzales, who joined the county in the Supreme Court filing as a private citizen.

The filing states the county seeks to reclaim its constitutional authority “to tailor regulations and orders which are specific to its residents based on facts which are unique to their locations rather than subject its residents to overbroad multi-county, Governor-implemented, regionalized lockdowns.”

Update on Short-Term Rentals

The State has now added short-term lodging to its language regarding hotels under the new regional stay-at-home order. The language states hotels and short-term lodging operators “cannot accept or honor out-of-state reservations for non-essential travel, unless the reservation is for at least the minimum time period required for quarantine and the persons identified in the reservation will quarantine in the hotel or lodging entity until after that time period has expired.” It also limits in-state reservations to essential purposes.

Here is a link to the information from the State: https://covid19.ca.gov/stay-home-except-for-essential-needs/#regional-stay-home-order

As to enforcement of the State’s orders, the County will continue to educate and engage with businesses and organizations on a cooperative basis on safe practices and current health orders, and respond to complaints about violations as appropriate on a case-by-case basis.

If you have questions about the State’s order with regard to short-term rentals, please contact the State of California or your state representative. The State’s COVID-19 website is https://covid19.ca.gov/.

 

Holiday lights contests set to light up cities and towns throughout the county

Several cities and towns in San Bernardino County are holding contests and holiday lights events to bring out the holiday spirit in our communities this year.

There are three entries in the Holiday Porch Decorating contest in the Town of Yucca Valley this year. These beautiful images show the residents there are feeling merry and bright!

The City of Montclair judged their Holiday Lights contest this year and you can view the winners here to see who is lighting up their neighborhoods.

In the City of Chino Hills there is a Holiday Home Decorating Contest that closes Friday, December 11.

Judging will be based on the following criteria and there will be one winner for each category:

-Best Holiday Spirit
-Classic Holiday
-Best in Show

Winners will be notified on Wednesday, December 16.

The City of Upland has a Home for the Holidays house decorating contest to bring cheer to their neighborhoods!  Judging was based on curb appeal only for exterior decorations, including decorations that are visible outside.

This year’s decorating categories included:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The City of Twentynine Palms hosted a Community Light Decorating Contest & Self-Guided Tour Saturday, December 5.

The address list for the homes that participated can be found on the City’s website for the remainder of the month for all to enjoy

And last, but not ever least, in our own Winter Wonderland of Big Bear Lake, residents may visit the Big Bear Grizzly newspaper to see the Deck the House Holiday Lights Contest featuring 12 homes in Big Bear Valley decorated and entered in the contest. There is a link for voting on their website and a link to the addresses the site as well and in the weekly newspaper at https://bigbeargrizzly.net/.

December 9, 2020 Update

The County Update publishes each Wednesday and also as needed, to share important news and resources in our battle against COVID-19 and to keep our economy running. We remain here for you. #SBCountyTogether

For latest COVID-19 statistics and important links, scroll to the bottom of today’s Update

In today’s Update:

  • FAQs for pending vaccines now available
  • Where did CARES Act funding go?
  • 6 Tips for handling stress during the holidays
  • No-cost business webinars
  • Sheriff COVID-19 cases update

FAQs on New Vaccines Now Available on County Website

The County of San Bernardino and Arrowhead Regional Medical Center (ARMC) are committed to implementing a comprehensive response to the COVID-19 vaccination process based on guidelines established by the CDC, California Department of Public Health and the San Bernardino County COVID-19 Vaccination Task Force.

To help keep our county residents informed and up-to-date, we will be sharing breaking news on the rollout of the vaccine through this County Update and on a dedicated page on the County website. Launching today are Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) that share what we know now about the upcoming COVID-19 vaccinations and phased rollout.

The FAQs cover the following topics:

  • Vaccine testing process and current vaccinations under development (or available)
  • Timing of vaccine availability and phases of vaccine allocation
  • Safety of the vaccine and administering of shots
  • Links to information resources

The FAQs can be found through the dedicated link on the https://sbcovid19.com/ webpage and will be updated as new information becomes available.

“There is no bigger news right now in our fight against COVID-19 than the arrival and successful delivery of these vaccines to all San Bernardino County residents,” said Board of Supervisor Chairman Curt Hagman. “Throughout this pandemic, we’ve prioritized sharing information as we get it with our residents and businesses, and the rollout of the vaccine will be no different.”

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is meeting on December 10 at which time it is anticipated that they will approve the first vaccine, which will be from Pfizer-BioNTech. Pre-positioned vaccines are scheduled to arrive in California on December 15 or 16. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), which is a committee within the CDC that provides advice and guidance on effective control of vaccine-preventable diseases, will meet in an emergency meeting on December 11 and 13 and is expected to recommend use of the first COVID-19 vaccine. On December 17, the FDA is meeting and is anticipated to approve the second vaccine, which will be from Moderna Inc.  These first doses of the vaccine are intended to go to frontline healthcare workers in our County hospitals.

CARES Act Investments Will Benefit County Long After Pandemic Ends

Earlier this year, Congress passed and the president signed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, better known as the CARES Act. The legislation earmarked $150 billion in federal support to state and local governments, with San Bernardino County ultimately receiving $430.6 million.

Among the Board of Supervisor’s responsibilities were determining the most effective allocation of those funds to the County’s cities, towns, schools and school districts, fire districts and private hospitals — as well as investments made at the county level.

While many of the resulting expenditures focused on mitigating the spread of the virus, many organizations have made infrastructure improvements that will enhance efficiency and effectiveness long after the pandemic subsides.

“We’re very fortunate to have received emergency funding from the U.S. Treasury, and are impressed with the thoughtful ways our cities and schools have invested those funds,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman. “While most investments have been devoted to public health, many offer benefits we’ll be enjoying for years to come.”

Such investments range from the purchase of new Chromebooks and laptop computers for remote learning to critical technology upgrades that will enable the county and cities to improve service to their constituents long after the pandemic subsides.

A sample of what CARES has funded

One high profile program launched by the County was the COVID-Compliant Business Partnership, which earmarked $30 million for county businesses that agree to comply with a variety of COVID-9-related safety measures. Thus far, more than 5,300 county businesses have elected to participate in the program. Qualifying businesses still have four more days — until December 13 — to sign up for the program.

Municipalities in San Bernardino County received considerable funding to help them cope with the pandemic, and thus far, our 24 incorporated cities or towns have invested more than $20 million on 110 separate projects. Another $25 million will be made available for proposed infrastructure projects (which require a 1:1 match from the participating city).

Similarly, our schools and school districts have spent $30.5 million on 86 distinct projects with another $15 million available for infrastructure projects (again, with a 1:1 match from participating schools). These range from adding hand sanitizer stations to installing bipolar ionization upgrades to district-wide HVAC systems that will improve air quality and circulation. County school districts also invested almost $2 million to ensure low-income students have access to the technology needed to engage in distance learning.

Significant funds were also provided to the County’s private hospitals, with $10 million allocated directly on the basis of the average daily patient census, along with another $10 million worth of personal protective equipment, or PPE.

Non-profit organizations in the County have been allocated $5 million (through the Community Foundation) to reimburse demonstrable COVID-19 expenses. This is in addition to several non-profit groups that were also able to take advantage of the COVID-Compliant Business Partnership.

While the pandemic has been undeniably dreadful, we are impressed with the efficient ways our cities, schools, hospitals and others have identified urgent needs and responded appropriately. Our goal is to every dollar is spent efficiently and effectively for the benefit of county businesses and residents.

Six Ways to Protect Your Mental Health This Holiday Season

The holiday season, with its traditional emphasis on time with loved ones and expectations of joy that may go unmet, is likely only to exacerbate the strain this year. Even during the best of times, nearly two thirds of people with a diagnosed mental illness report that the holidays make their mental health challenges worse. This is part two of a three part series on mental health and 2020.

With all of these overlapping concerns in mind, it’s more important than ever during this season of this particular year to prioritize mental well-being, which in the long-term helps to protect your personal brand as well. Here are some strategies for doing just that during this upcoming holiday season:

  1. Emphasize well-being.
    This may seem overly simplified, but it is an important foundational mindset shift to do the things that emphasize both mental and physical well-being in a year designed to challenge both. That may mean turning down holiday invitations that would usually bring joy in favor of protecting loved ones with a pre-existing condition. It may mean relaxing long-term financial goals for just a few months in favor of spending money to get through the holidays however possible. With every decision this holiday season, vow to emphasize mental and physical well-being.
  2. Consent to boundaries.
    In light of the concerns over COVID-19 infection, boundaries with family, friends and work engagements are crucial. Firm and thoughtful discussions over safety protocol should be consented to by anyone planning to gather, and respect should be shown for anyone who chooses not to leave the safety of their own home. This holiday season is the perfect time to set those frank boundaries, as the stakes are higher than ever.
  3. Create new traditions.
    Because of the pandemic or economic strains, certain long-held traditions, whether long-distance work or personal travel or local community celebrations, may become impossible this year. This can be extremely disappointing and exacerbate the holiday blues. Take time to acknowledge that sadness, but then choose to create new traditions instead of wallowing. Seeing relatives on video chat may not be a perfect substitute for an in-person gathering, but the upside may be that more relatives are able to talk in real-time than ever before. Build new traditions and focus on what is being gained, rather than what has been lost. It is a great time to try to be more positive, a trait that will be particularly memorable in a difficult year.
  4. Get outside.
    As the weather cools down across the country and the sun sets earlier and earlier, it can be tempting to hunker down under blankets and stay inside for days. With the proliferation of remote work, it is even more possible to entirely avoid leaving the house for long stretches of time. Resist that impulse, bundle up, and get (safely!) outside as often as possible. Studies have found that time outside in nature improves blood pressure, lowers stress hormones, and helps break the loop of negative thoughts. If getting outside is impossible, playing nature sounds indoors has been shown to have similar effects.
  5. Challenge yourself.
    In a season that emphasizes gift-giving, it can be easy to simply order the latest gadget or trendy fashion to surprise loved ones. Instead, consider using the opportunity of the season as a way to learn new skills. Perhaps a cross-stitch of a friend’s favorite television show or a homemade specialty sourdough loaf will put the new skills learned during lockdown to use while also touching the hearts of loved ones this year. Educational courses on digital platforms that help grow your resume are another way to learn new skills.
  6. Help others.
    One proven way to boost mental health is by simply taking the focus outward and being of assistance to others. Studies show that altruism improves both mental and physical health, making it an obvious choice, especially during the holiday season when others may be most in need of help. Volunteer with a local organization, gather supplies for a neighbor experiencing hardship, or even make it a point to check in more often on a lonely friend. Everyone will benefit from the mental health benefits of community helping.

In a year filled with unique challenges that even the CDC recognizes will pose extra mental health concerns, it is critical to take care of holiday season mental health. Choose to prioritize mental health, establish boundaries, create new holiday traditions, get outside, find ways to challenge yourself, and be a community helper. All of these strategies can help make this difficult holiday season brighter.

These tips come courtesy of Deana Kahle, M.S LMFT, Wellness Coordinator for the County’s Department of Behavioral Health

Upcoming Webinars to Help Business Owners and Workforce

San Bernardino County in conjunction with other partners both regionally and throughout the state are pleased to bring business owners and interested residents ongoing webinars on a variety of important topics. We aim to do everything we can to help businesses succeed during this difficult time. To see all upcoming webinars, visit the Workforce Development Board events page.

Harassment Prevention for Supervisors

This virtual training will take a fresh look at harassment, discrimination, retaliation and governing laws. We will examine scenarios and workplace incidents and discuss possible appropriate responses, as well as review a supervisor’s role in harassment prevention

Thursday, December 10, 10 a.m. to noon

Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/harassment-prevention-for-supervisors-tickets-126480499579

Sheriff Update on Inmates and Employees Testing Positive for COVID-19

A total of 602 County jail inmates have tested positive for COVID-19. Many of the inmates are only experiencing minor symptoms of the virus. The infected inmates are in isolation, being monitored around the clock, and are being provided with medical treatment. A total of 518 inmates have recovered from the illness.

A total of 461 department employees have tested positive for COVID-19 and are self-isolating at home; 292 employees have recovered from the virus. Other employees are expected to return to work in the next few weeks.

 Latest Stats

111,518 Confirmed Cases             (up 2.4% from the previous day)
1,208 Deaths                                     (up 0.1% from the previous day)
1,245,718 Tests                                (up 1.1% from the previous day)

Current Southern California ICU Capacity: 9% (Goal to lift State Stay-at-Home Order: 15%)

For more statistics from the COVID-19 Surveillance Dashboard, click the desktop or mobile tab on the County’s sbcovid19.com website.

For all COVID-19 related information, including case statistics, FAQs, guidelines and resources, visit the County’s COVID-19 webpage at http://sbcovid19.com/.  Residents of San Bernardino County may also call the COVID-19 helpline at (909) 387-3911 for general information and resources about the virus. The phone line is NOT for medical calls and is available Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. If you have questions about social services, please call 211.

Actualización del 9 de diciembre de 2020

La Actualización del Condado publicará una vez a la semana, los miércoles y también según sea necesario, con el fin de compartir noticias y recursos importantes en nuestra batalla contra COVID-19 y para mantener nuestra economía funcionando. Permanecemos aquí para usted. #SBCountyTogether

Para las estadísticas más recientes y enlaces importantes, desplácese hasta la parte inferior de la actualización de hoy.

En la actualización de hoy:

  • Preguntas frecuentes sobre las vacunas pendientes ya disponibles
  • A dónde fue la financiación de CARES Act?
  • 6 Consejos para manejar el estrés durante la temporada de las Fiestas
  • Seminarios web de negocios gratuitos
  • Actualización de casos de COVID-19 del Sheriff

Preguntas frecuentes sobre nuevas vacunas ya están disponibles en el sitio web del condado

El condado de San Bernardino y Arrowhead Regional Medical Center (ARMC) están comprometidos a implementar una respuesta integral al proceso de vacunación COVID-19 basado en las pautas establecidas por los CDC, el Departamento de Salud Pública de California y el Grupo de Trabajo de vacunación COVID-19 del Condado de San Bernardino.

Para ayudar a mantener a nuestros residentes del condado informados y actualizados, compartiremos noticias de última hora sobre la implementación de la vacuna a través de esta Actualización del Condado y en una página dedicada en el sitio web del Condado. Hoy se presentan las Preguntas más frecuentes (FAQs) que comparten lo que sabemos ahora sobre las próximas vacunas COVID-19 y despliegue por fases.

Las preguntas frecuentes cubren los siguientes temas:

  • Proceso de prueba de vacunas y vacunas actuales en desarrollo (o disponibles)
  • Tiempo de la disponibilidad de vacunas y fases de asignación de vacunas
  • Seguridad de la vacuna y administración de vacunas
  • Enlaces a recursos de información

Las preguntas frecuentes se pueden encontrar a través del enlace dedicado en la página web https://sbcovid19.com/ y se actualizará ya que se disponga nueva información.

“No hay noticias más grandes en este momento en nuestra lucha contra COVID-19 que la llegada y la entrega exitosa de estas vacunas a todos los residentes del Condado de San Bernardino”, dijo el Presidente de la Junta de Supervisores, Curt Hagman. “A lo largo de esta pandemia, hemos priorizado compartir información a medida que la obtengamos con nuestros residentes y empresas, y la implementación de la vacuna no será diferente”.

La Administración de Alimentos y Medicamentos (FDA) se reúne el 10 de diciembre, momento en el que se prevé que aprobarán la primera vacuna, que será de Pfizer-BioNTech. Las vacunas preposicionadas están programadas para llegar a California el 15 o 16 de diciembre. El Comité Asesor sobre prácticas de Inmunización (ACIP) The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), que es un Comité dentro de los CDC que proporciona asesoramiento y orientación sobre el control eficaz de las enfermedades prevenibles por vacunación, se reunirá en una reunión de emergencia los días 11 y 13 de diciembre will meet in an emergency meeting on December 11 and 13  y se espera que recomiende el uso de la primera vacuna COVID-19. El 17 de diciembre, la FDA se reúne y se prevé aprobar la segunda vacuna, que será de Moderna Inc. Estas primeras dosis de la vacuna están destinadas a ir a los trabajadores de atención médica de primera línea en nuestros hospitales del condado.

Las inversiones de CARES Act beneficiarán al condado mucho después de que termine pandemia

A principios de este año, el Congreso aprobó y el presidente firmó la Ley de Ayuda Coronavirus, Alivio y Seguridad Económica, más conocida como la Ley CARES Act. La legislación destinó 150.000 millones de dólares en apoyo federal a los gobiernos estatales y locales, y el condado de San Bernardino finalmente recibió 430,6 millones de dólares.

Entre las responsabilidades de la Junta de Supervisores estaban determinando la asignación más efectiva de esos fondos a las ciudades, pueblos, escuelas y distritos escolares del Condado, distritos de bomberos y hospitales privados, así como inversiones realizadas a nivel de condado.

Aunque muchos de los gastos resultantes se centraron en mitigar la propagación del virus, muchas organizaciones han realizado mejoras en la infraestructura que mejorarán la eficiencia y la eficacia mucho después de que la pandemia se haya desplomado.

“Somos muy afortunados de haber recibido fondos de emergencia de la Tesorería de los Estados Unidos, y estamos impresionados con las maneras pensadas en que nuestras ciudades y escuelas han invertido esos fondos”, dijo el presidente de la Junta de Supervisores, Curt Hagman. “aunque la mayoría de las inversiones se han dedicado a la salud pública, muchas ofrecen beneficios que estaremos disfrutando durante los próximos años”.

Estas inversiones van desde la compra de nuevos Chromebooks y computadoras portátiles para el aprendizaje remoto hasta actualizaciones de tecnología crítica que permitirán al condado y a las ciudades mejorar el servicio a sus electores mucho después de que la pandemia disminuya.

Una muestra de lo que CARES Act ha financiado

Un programa de alto perfil lanzado por el Condado fue la Asociación Comercial Compatible con COVID, que destinó $30 millones a los negocios del condado que acuerdan cumplir con una variedad de medidas de seguridad relacionadas con COVID-9. Hasta ahora, más de 5,300 empresas del condado han elegido participar en el programa. Los negocios que califican todavía tienen cuatro días más — hasta diciembre de 13 — para inscribirse en el programa. Qualifying businesses still have four more days — until December 13 — to sign up for the program.

Los municipios del condado de San Bernardino recibieron considerable financiación para ayudarles a hacer frente a la pandemia, y hasta ahora, nuestras 24 ciudades o pueblos incorporados han invertido más de $20 millones en 110 proyectos separados. Otros $25 millones estarán disponibles para proyectos de infraestructura propuestos (que requieren un partido 1:1 de la ciudad participante).

De manera similar, nuestras escuelas y distritos escolares han gastado $30.5 millones en 86 proyectos distintos con otros $15 millones disponibles para proyectos de infraestructura (nuevamente, con un partido 1:1 de las escuelas participantes). Estos van desde la adición de estaciones desinfectantes de manos hasta la instalación de actualizaciones de ionización bipolar a sistemas de HVAC de todo el distrito que mejorarán la calidad del aire y la circulación. Los distritos escolares del condado también invirtieron casi $2 millones para asegurar que los estudiantes de bajos ingresos tengan acceso a la tecnología necesaria.

También se proporcionaron fondos importantes a los hospitales privados del Condado, con $10 millones asignados directamente sobre la base del censo diario promedio de pacientes, junto con otros $10 millones de equipo de protección personal.

A las organizaciones sin fines de lucro del Condado se les han asignado $5 millones (a través de la Fundación Comunitaria) para reembolsar los gastos demostrables de COVID-19. Esto se suma a varios grupos sin fines de lucro que también pudieron aprovechar la Asociación Comercial compatible con COVID.

Aunque la pandemia ha sido sin duda terrible, nos impresionan las maneras eficientes en que nuestras ciudades, escuelas, hospitales y otros han identificado necesidades urgentes y respondido adecuadamente. Nuestra meta es que cada dólar se gaste eficiente y eficazmente para el beneficio de los negocios y residentes del condado.

Seis maneras de proteger su salud mental esta temporada de las Fiestas
La temporada navideña, con su énfasis tradicional en el tiempo con sus seres queridos y expectativas de alegría que pueden no ser satisfechas, es probable que sólo exacerbará la tensión este año. Incluso en el mejor de los tiempos, casi dos tercios de las personas nearly two thirds of people con una enfermedad mental diagnosticada informan que las vacaciones empeoran sus desafíos de salud mental. Esta es la segunda parte de una serie de tres partes sobre salud mental y 2020.

Teniendo en cuenta todas estas preocupaciones, es más importante que nunca durante esta temporada de este año en particular priorizar el bienestar mental, lo que a largo plazo ayuda a proteger también su Marca personal. Aquí están algunas estrategias para hacer eso durante esta próxima temporada de fiestas:

  1. Enfatizar el bienestar. Esto puede parecer demasiado simplificado, pero es un cambio fundamental de mentalidad para hacer las cosas que enfatizan el bienestar mental y físico en un año diseñado para desafiar a ambos. Eso puede significar rechazar las invitaciones de vacaciones que normalmente traerían alegría a favor de proteger a los seres queridos con una condición preexistente. Puede significar relajar objetivos financieros a largo plazo por sólo unos meses a favor de gastar dinero para pasar las vacaciones por lo que sea posible.
  2. Consentimiento a los límites. A la luz de las preocupaciones sobre la infección POR COVID-19, los límites con la familia, los amigos y los compromisos laborales son cruciales. Las discusiones firmes y reflexivas sobre el protocolo de seguridad deben ser consentidas por cualquier persona que planee reunirse, y se debe mostrar respeto por cualquier persona que decida no salir de la seguridad de su propia casa. Esta temporada navideña es el momento perfecto para establecer esos límites francos, ya que las apuestas son más altas que nunca.
  3. Crear nuevas tradiciones. Debido a la pandemia o a las tensiones económicas, ciertas tradiciones, ya sea trabajo a larga distancia o       viajes personales o celebraciones de la comunidad local, pueden ser imposibles este año. Esto puede ser extremadamente decepcionante y exacerbar la tristeza de las vacaciones. Tómese el tiempo para reconocer esa tristeza, pero luego elija crear nuevas tradiciones en lugar. Ver a los familiares en el videochat puede no ser un sustituto perfecto para una reunión en persona, pero la ventaja puede ser que más parientes sean capaces de hablar en tiempo real que nunca. Construir nuevas tradiciones y centrarse en lo que se está ganando, en lugar de lo que se ha perdido. Es un buen momento para tratar de ser más positivo, un rasgo que será particularmente memorable en un año difícil.
  4. Salir afuera. A medida que el clima se enfría en todo el país y oscurece mas temprano, puede ser tentador meterse bajo las mantas y quedarse dentro durante días. Con la proliferación del trabajo remoto, es aún más posible evitar completamente salir de la casa por largos períodos de tiempo. Resistir ese impulso, agrupe y consiga (con seguridad) fuera tan a menudo como sea posible.  Los estudios Studies have found han encontrado que el tiempo fuera en la naturaleza mejora la presión arterial, reduce las hormonas de estrés, y ayuda a romper el círculo de pensamientos negativos. Si salir al exterior es imposible, se ha demostrado que reproducir sonidos de la naturaleza en interiores tiene efectos similares.
  5.  Desafíate a ti mismo. En una temporada que enfatiza dar regalos, puede ser fácil simplemente pedir el último gadget o moda para sorprender a los seres queridos. En lugar de eso, considere usar la oportunidad de la temporada como una manera de aprender nuevas habilidades. Tal vez un punto de cruz del programa favorito de televisión de un amigo o un pan casero especial pondrá las nuevas habilidades aprendidas durante el cierre a utilizar mientras también toca los corazones de seres queridos este año. Los cursos educativos sobre plataformas digitales son otra manera de aprender nuevas habilidades.
  6. Ayudar a otros. Una manera probada de impulsar la salud mental es simplemente tomar el enfoque hacia afuera y ayudar a otros. Los estudios muestran Studies show  que el altruismo mejora la salud mental y física, lo que lo convierte en una opción obvia, especialmente durante la temporada de vacaciones, cuando otros pueden necesitar más ayuda. Ofrézcase como voluntario con una organización local, reúna suministros para un vecino que experimenta dificultades, o incluso haga que sea un punto de comprobación más a menudo en un amigo solitario. Todos beneficiarán de los beneficios de salud mental de la ayuda comunitaria.

En un año lleno de desafíos únicos que incluso el CDC even the CDC recognizes reconoce que planteará preocupaciones adicionales de salud mental, es crítico cuidar de la salud mental de la temporada de vacaciones. Elija priorizar la salud mental, establecer límites, crear nuevas tradiciones de vacaciones, salir, encontrar maneras de desafiarse a sí mismo, y ser un ayudante de la comunidad. Todas estas estrategias pueden ayudar a hacer que esta difícil temporada de vacaciones sea más brillante.

Estos consejos son cortesía de Deana Kahle, M.S LMFT, Coordinadora de Bienestar del Departamento de Salud Mental del Condado

Próximos seminarios web para ayudar a los propietarios de negocios y la fuerza de trabajoEl Condado de San Bernardino en conjunto con otros socios regionales y a lo largo del estado se complace en traer a los propietarios de negocios y residentes interesados en los seminarios web en curso sobre una variedad de temas importantes. Nuestro objetivo es hacer todo lo posible para ayudar a las empresas a tener éxito durante este difícil momento. Para ver todos los próximos seminarios web, visite la página de eventos de la Junta de Desarrollo de la Fuerza laboral Workforce Development Board events page.

Prevención del Acoso para Supervisores

Este entrenamiento virtual tendrá una nueva mirada al acoso, discriminación, represalias y leyes que gobiernan. Examinaremos escenarios e incidentes en el lugar de trabajo y discutiremos posibles respuestas apropiadas, así como la función de un supervisor en la prevención del acoso
Jueves, 10 de diciembre, de 10 a.m. a mediodía
Registro:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/harassment-prevention-for-supervisors-tickets-126480499579

Actualización del Sheriff sobre presos y empleados que han resultado positivos de COVID-19

Un total de 602 presos en las cárceles del condado han resultado positivos de COVID-19. Muchos de los presos sólo están experimentando síntomas menores del virus. Los presos infectados están aislados, siendo vigilados las 24 horas del día y reciben tratamiento médico. Un total de 518 presos se han recuperado de la enfermedad.

Un total de 461 empleados del departamento han resultado positivos de COVID-19 y se autoaislan en casa; 292 empleados se han recuperado del virus. Se espera que los otros empleados regresen a trabajar en las próximas semanas.

Estadísticas más recientes

111,518 Casos Confirmados                        (un 2.4% desde el día anterior)
1,208 Muertes                                               (un 0.1% desde el día anterior)
1,245,718 Pruebas                                        (un 1.1% desde el día anterior)

Capacidad actual de las unidades de cuidados intensivos (UCI) del sur de California: 9 % (objetivo para levantar el pedido de permanencia en casa del estado: el 15 %)

Para obtener más estadísticas del Tablero de Vigilancia COVID-19, haga clic en la pestaña de escritorio o móvil en sbcovid19.com sitio web del Condado.

Para toda la información relacionada con COVID-19, incluyendo estadísticas de casos, preguntas frecuentes, pautas y recursos, visite la página web de COVID-19 del Condado en http://sbcovid19.com/.  Los residentes del Condado de San Bernardino también pueden llamar a la línea de ayuda COVID-19 al (909) 387-3911 para obtener información general y recursos sobre el virus. La línea telefónica NO es para llamadas médicas y está disponible de lunes a viernes, de 9 a.m. a 5 p.m. Si tiene preguntas sobre servicios sociales, llame al 211.

December 8, 2020 Update – Special Edition

The County Update publishes each Wednesday, and also as needed, to share important news and resources in our battle against COVID-19 and to keep our economy running. We remain here for you. #SBCountyTogether

For latest Statistics and link to our COVID-19 Community Testing page, scroll to the bottom of today’s Update

In today’s Update:

  • County swears in new Supervisors
  • Regional Stay Home Order now in effect

 County Welcomes New Supervisors

Former Congressman and retired U.S. Marine Col. Paul Cook, County Supervisor Dawn Rowe, and former Rialto Councilman and State Assembly Member Joe Baca, Jr. were administered the oath of office on Monday, Dec. 7, and began four-year terms on the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors.

Supervisor Paul Cook

They join Supervisor and Board Chairman Curt Hagman and Supervisor Janice Rutherford on the body that governs an award-winning organization made up of more than 23,000 employees and more than 100 departments, divisions, and agencies offering a diverse array of essential and quality-of-life services to more than 2.2 million county residents.

“I am very, very honored to be here,” Supervisor Cook said after being sworn in by his wife Jeanne. “Local government is where it all begins. This is part of the reason I got involved – to make a difference.”

After being administered the oath by her father, Robert Haynes, Supervisor Rowe said, “I would like to thank the voters. It is an honor to be here. It has been a long journey for me since the time I was appointed in December 2018.”

Supervisor Dawn Rowe

“I’ve had the chance to work with great people and I’ve learned a lot,” Rowe said. “I’m very blessed that God has placed me here to do good work for our citizens.”

“These are challenging times, and I’m looking forward to taking on the challenge and working with all of you and working for this community,” Supervisor Baca said after being sworn in by his father, retired seven-term Congressman Joe Baca, Sr.

Due to COVID-19, attendance was limited to a small group of masked and socially distanced family members, staff, and friends. A recording of the event can be viewed on the CountyDirect Broadcast Network under the “Other Meetings and Events tab.

Supervisor Joe Baca, Jr.

Supervisor Cook was elected in March to represent the First Supervisorial District, which includes the Town of Apple Valley and the cities of Adelanto, Hesperia, Needles, and Victorville. Cook had served in Congress since 2013 and also served in the State Assembly and on the Yucca Valley Town Council. Cook succeeds Robert Lovingood, who retired after serving two terms on the Board of Supervisors.

Supervisor Rowe was elected in March to represent the Third Supervisorial District, which includes the Town of Yucca Valley and the cities of Barstow, Big Bear Lake, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Loma Linda, Redlands, San Bernardino, Twentynine Palms, and Yucaipa. Rowe has served on the Board of Supervisors since December 2018 and previously served on the Yucca Valley Town Council.

Supervisor Baca was elected in November to represent the Fifth Supervisorial District, which includes the cities of Colton, Fontana, Rialto, and San Bernardino. Baca had served on the Rialto City Council since 2006 and also served in the State Assembly. Baca succeeds Josie Gonzales, who retired after serving four terms on the Board of Supervisors.

San Bernardino County Now in State Regional Stay Home Order Due to Increased Hospitalizations

Due to an alarming decrease in ICU capacity in San Bernardino County and throughout Southern California, residents and businesses here are now under a State-mandated Regional Stay Home Order. The new order went into effect at midnight on Sunday and will remain in place for at least three weeks.

“Our county’s hospitalization rate has been rising rapidly for several weeks and our ICU capacity is dwindling toward the single digits. We must ensure capacity for our sickest and most vulnerable residents,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman. “That’s why county leadership and the county’s healthcare and public heath teams are working tirelessly and employing all innovations to increase capacity and move us toward better community health and safety.”

The new State order segments the state into five separate regions. San Bernardino County is part of the Southern California region, which also includes Imperial, Inyo, Mono, Orange, Riverside, Los Angeles, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and Ventura counties. Southern California and the San Joaquin Valley regions are currently under the State stay-at-home mandate.

The State Regional Stay Home Order (PDF), announced December 3, 2020, and a supplemental order, signed December 6, 2020, goes into effect the day after a region has been announced to have less than 15% ICU availability. These orders prohibit private gatherings of any size, close sector operations except for critical infrastructure and retail, and require 100% masking and physical distancing in all others. The Southern California region currently has a 10.1% ICU availability, as of today, Dec. 8.

Once triggered, these State directives will remain in effect for at least 3 weeks. After that period, they will be lifted when a region’s projected ICU capacity meets or exceeds 15%. This will be assessed on a weekly basis after the initial 3 week period. Learn more about these orders on the California Department of Public Health website.

The State order limits retail stores to 20% capacity and 35% for standalone grocery stores. Eating or drinking inside stores is prohibited. Non-essential businesses, meaning those that are not defined as critical infrastructure, must close for in-person activities, with the exception of retail. Essential work is permitted to continue. The new rules also ban non-essential travel, but outdoor recreation facilities will remain open.

Details on what constitutes essential work and businesses, as well as many other Frequently Asked Questions, can be found at https://covid19.ca.gov/stay-home-except-for-essential-needs/.

“The decrease in our ICU capacity is not to be taken lightly. We must do what we can to ensure we have the resources to treat those who need help the most. That’s why the County continues to urge everyone to wear masks, physically distance, and avoid gatherings whenever possible,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman, noting that local data clearly shows that private gatherings of families and friends continues are far and away the leading source of spread within San Bernardino County.

“At the same time, we will continue to work on behalf of our residents and businesses for fair and effective safety measures, and, most of all, securing adequate amounts of vaccine as soon as they are available,” Hagman said.

The County’s posture on the State’s order will be to continue to educate and engage with businesses and organizations on a cooperative basis on safe practices and current health orders, and respond to complaints about violations as appropriate on a case-by-case basis. Complaints can be made through the County’s COVID-19 website.

County attorneys, at the Board of Supervisors’ direction, are continuing to examine what legal options might be available to provide relief to struggling businesses in those areas of the county with lower COVID-19 numbers than the county as a whole.

Latest Stats

108,946 Confirmed Cases             (up 0.9% from the previous day)
1,207 Deaths                                    (up 1.1% from the previous day)
1,232,457 Tests                               (up 1% from the previous day)

Current Southern California ICU Capacity: 10.1 % (Goal to lift State Stay-at-Home Order: 15%)

For more statistics from the COVID-19 Surveillance Dashboard, click the desktop or mobile tab on the County’s sbcovid19.com website.

 For all COVID-19 related information, including case statistics, FAQs, guidelines and resources, visit the County’s COVID-19 webpage at http://sbcovid19.com/.  Residents of San Bernardino County may also call the COVID-19 helpline at (909) 387-3911 for general information and resources about the virus. The phone line is NOT for medical calls and is available Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. If you have questions about social services, please call 211.

Actualización del 8 de diciembre de 2020

Edición Especial

La Actualización del Condado publicará una vez a la semana, los miércoles y también según sea necesario, con el fin de compartir noticias y recursos importantes en nuestra batalla contra COVID-19 y para mantener nuestra economía funcionando. Permanecemos aquí para usted. #SBCountyTogether

Para las estadísticas más recientes y enlaces importantes, desplácese hasta la parte inferior de la actualización de hoy.

En la actualización de hoy:

  • El juramiento de nuevos supervisors del Condado
  • Orden regional de permanecer en casa ahora en efecto

El condado da la bienvenida a los nuevos supervisores

Supervisor Paul Cook

El ex congresista y el ex coronel de la Marina de los Estados Unidos, Paul Cook, la supervisora del condado Dawn Rowe, y el ex concejal de Rialto y miembro de la Asamblea del Estado, Joe Baca, Jr., recibieron el juramento de cargo el lunes 7 de diciembre. Y comenzó cuatro años de duración en la Junta de supervisores del Condado de San Bernardino

Se unen con el Supervisor y Presidente de la Junta de supervisores, Curt Hagman, y la Supervisora, Janice Rutherford, en el organismo que gobierna una organización galardonada compuesta por más de 23,000 empleados y más de 100 departamentos, divisiones, y agencias que ofrecen una variedad diversa de servicios esenciales y de calidad de vida a más de 2.2 millones de residentes del condado.

Supervisor Dawn Rowe

“Es un gran honor para mí estar aquí”, dijo el Supervisor Cook después de haber sido jurado por su esposa Jeanne. “El gobierno local es donde todo comienza. Esto es parte de la razón por la que me involucré – para hacer una diferencia.”

Después de ser administrada el juramento por su padre, Robert Haynes, Supervisora Rowe dijo: “Me gustaría dar las gracias a los votantes. Es un honor estar aquí. Ha sido un largo viaje para mí desde que fui nombrada en diciembre de 2018.”

“He tenido la oportunidad de trabajar con gente estupenda y he aprendido mucho”, dijo Rowe. “Estoy muy bendecida porque Dios me ha puesto aquí para hacer un buen trabajo para nuestros ciudadanos”.

“Estos son tiempos difíciles, y estoy deseando asumir el desafío y trabajar con todos ustedes y trabajar para esta comunidad”, dijo el Supervisor Baca después de haber sido jurado por su padre, el congresista jubilado de siete mandatos Joe Baca, Sr.

Debido a COVID-19, la asistencia se limitó a un pequeño grupo de familiares, miembros del personal y amigos usando máscaras y socialmente distanciados. Una grabación del evento puede verse en la difusión del Condado en la ficha “otras Reuniones y Eventos CountyDirect Broadcast Network.

Supervisor Joe Baca, Jr.

El Supervisor Cook fue elegido en marzo para representar al primer Distrito Supervisor, que incluye la Ciudad de Apple Valley y las ciudades de Adelanto, Hesperia, Needles y Victorville. Cook había servido en el Congreso desde 2013 y también sirvió en la Asamblea Estatal y en el Consejo Municipal de Yucca Valley. Cook sucede a Robert Lovingood, quien se retiró después de cumplir dos términos en la Junta de supervisores.

La supervisora Rowe fue elegida en marzo para representar al Tercer Distrito Supervisor, que incluye la ciudad de Yucca Valley y las ciudades de Barstow, Big Bear Lake, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Loma Linda, Redlands, San Bernardino, Twentynine Palms y Yucaipa. Rowe ha servido en la Junta de Supervisores desde diciembre de 2018 y anteriormente sirvió en el Consejo Municipal de Yucca Valley.

El supervisor Baca fue elegido en noviembre para representar al Quinto Distrito Supervisor, que incluye las ciudades de Colton, Fontana, Rialto y San Bernardino. Baca había servido en el Ayuntamiento de Rialto desde 2006 y también sirvió en la Asamblea Estatal. Baca sucede a Josie Gonzales, quien se retiró después de servir cuatro mandatos en la Junta de Supervisores.

El Condado de San Bernardino ahora bajo un mandato estatal, la Orden Regional de permanecer en casa debido al aumento de hospitalizaciones

Debido a una disminución alarmante en la capacidad de las unidades de cuidados intensivos (ICU) en el condado de San Bernardino y en todo el sur de California, los residentes y negocios aquí están ahora bajo un mandato estatal Orden Regional de permanecer en casa. La nueva orden entró en vigor a medianoche del domingo y permanecerá en vigor al menos 3 semanas.

“La tasa de hospitalización de nuestro condado ha estado aumentando rápidamente durante varias semanas y nuestra capacidad de las unidades de cuidados intensivos (ICU) está bajado al menos de 10%. Debemos garantizar la capacidad de nuestros residentes más enfermos y vulnerables”, dijo el presidente de la Junta de supervisores, Curt Hagman. “por eso los líderes del condado y los equipos de salud y salud pública del condado están trabajando incansablemente y empleando todas las innovaciones para aumentar la capacidad y movernos hacia una mejor salud y seguridad de la comunidad”.

La nueva orden estatal divide el estado en cinco regiones distintas. El Condado de San Bernardino es parte de la región del sur de California, que también incluye los condados Imperial, Inyo, Mono, Orange, Riverside, los Angeles, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Bárbara y Ventura. El sur de California y las regiones del Valle de San Joaquín están actualmente bajo el mandato de permanecer en casa del Estado.

La Orden Regional de permanecer en casa del Estado Regional Stay Home Order (PDF), anunciada el 3 de diciembre de 2020, y una orden suplementaria supplemental order, firmada el 6 de diciembre de 2020, entra en vigor el día después de que se haya anunciado que una región que tiene menos del 15% en las unidades de cuidados intensivos ( ICU). Estas órdenes prohíben las reuniones privadas de cualquier tamaño, cierra las operaciones del sector cercano excepto para la infraestructura crítica y la venta al por menor, y requieren 100% de uso de mascarilla y distanciamiento físico en todos los demás. La región del sur de California tiene actualmente una disponibilidad de 10.1% en UCI, hasta hoy, 8 de diciembre.

Una vez activadas, estas directivas estatales permanecerán en vigor al menos 3 semanas y, después de este periodo, se levantará cuando la capacidad proyectada de las ICU de una región alcance o exceda el 15 %. Esta será evaluada semanalmente después del periodo inicial de 3 semanas.

Obtenga más información sobre estos pedidos en el sitio web del Departamento de Salud Pública de California Learn more about these orders on the California Department of Public Health.

El pedido estatal limita las tiendas minoristas a un 20% de capacidad y un 35% para las tiendas de comestibles independientes. Está prohibido comer o beber dentro de las tiendas. Las empresas no esenciales, es decir, aquellas que no se definen como infraestructuras críticas, deben cerrar para las actividades en persona, con excepción de la venta al por menor. Se permite que continúe el trabajo esencial. Las nuevas normas también prohíben los viajes no esenciales, pero las instalaciones de recreación al aire libre seguirán abiertas.

Los detalles sobre lo que constituye el trabajo esencial y las empresas, así como muchas otras preguntas frecuentes, se pueden encontrar en https://covid19.ca.gov/stay-home-except-for-essential-needs/.

“La disminución de nuestra capacidad en las unidades de cuidados intensivos (ICU) no debe tomarse a la ligera. Debemos hacer lo que podamos para asegurarnos de que contamos con los recursos necesarios para tratar a quienes más necesitan ayuda. Por eso el Condado sigue instando a todos a usar máscaras, mantener la distancia física, y evitar reuniones siempre que sea posible”, dijo el presidente de la Junta de supervisores, Curt Hagman, señalando que los datos locales muestran claramente que las reuniones privadas de familias y amigos continúan siendo la principal fuente de propagación dentro del Condado de San Bernardino.

“Al mismo tiempo, seguiremos trabajando de parte de nuestros residentes y negocios para medidas de seguridad justas y efectivas y, sobre todo, para asegurar cantidades adecuadas de vacuna tan pronto como estén disponibles”, dijo Hagman.

La posición del Condado con la orden del estado será continuar educando y interactuando con las empresas y organizaciones de manera cooperativa sobre prácticas seguras y órdenes de salud actuales, y responder a las quejas sobre violaciones según corresponda caso por caso. Las quejas se pueden hacer a través del sitio web COVID-19 del Condado County’s COVID-19 website.

Los abogados del condado, bajo la dirección de la Junta de supervisores, continúan examinando qué opciones legales podrían estar disponibles para proporcionar alivio a los negocios en dificultades en aquellas áreas del condado con números COVID-19 más bajos que el condado entero.

Estadísticas más recientes

108,946 Casos Confirmados         (un 0.9% desde el día anterior)
1,207 Muertes                                  (un 1.1% desde el día anterior)
1,232,457 Pruebas                          (un 1% desde el día anterior)

Capacidad actual de las unidades de cuidados intensivos (UCI) del sur de California: 10.1 % (objetivo para levantar el pedido de permanencia en casa del estado: el 15 %)

Para obtener más estadísticas del Tablero de Vigilancia COVID-19, haga clic en la pestaña de escritorio o móvil en sbcovid19.com sitio web del Condado.

Para toda la información relacionada con COVID-19, incluyendo estadísticas de casos, preguntas frecuentes, pautas y recursos, visite la página web de COVID-19 del Condado en http://sbcovid19.com/.  Los residentes del Condado de San Bernardino también pueden llamar a la línea de ayuda COVID-19 al (909) 387-3911 para obtener información general y recursos sobre el virus. La línea telefónica NO es para llamadas médicas y está disponible de lunes a viernes, de 9 a.m. a 5 p.m. Si tiene preguntas sobre servicios sociales, llame al 211.

               

Cook, Rowe, and Baca take oath of office on Monday

Congressman and retired U.S. Marine Col. Paul Cook, Supervisor Dawn Rowe, and Rialto Councilman and former State Assembly Member Joe Baca, Jr. will take the oath of office and begin four-year terms on the Board of Supervisors at noon on Monday, Dec. 7.

Due to COVID-19 and social distancing requirements, the oath of office ceremony will be conducted without a public audience. However, the event can be viewed live on the CountyDirect Broadcast Network. It will also be archived on CountyDirect for viewing at a later time.

Supervisor-elect Cook was elected in March to represent the First Supervisorial District, which includes the Town of Apple Valley and the cities of Adelanto, Hesperia, Needles, and Victorville. Cook has served in Congress since 2013 and has also served in the State Assembly and on the Yucca Valley Town Council.

Cook will succeed Supervisor Robert Lovingood, who is retiring after serving two terms on the Board of Supervisors.

Supervisor Rowe was elected in March to represent the Third Supervisorial District, which includes the Town of Yucca Valley and the cities of Barstow, Big Bear Lake, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Loma Linda, Redlands, San Bernardino, Twentynine Palms, and Yucaipa. Rowe has served on the Board of Supervisors since December, 2018, and previously served on the Yucca Valley Town Council.

Supervisor-elect Baca was elected in November to represent the Fifth Supervisorial District, which includes the cities of Colton, Fontana, Rialto, and San Bernardino. Baca has served on the Rialto City Council since 2006 and has also served in the State Assembly.

Baca will succeed Supervisor and Board Vice Chair Josie Gonzales, who is retiring after serving four terms on the Board of Supervisors.

Cook, Rowe, and Baca will join Supervisor and Board Chairman Curt Hagman and Supervisor Janice Rutherford on the Board of Supervisors.

Twitter @SBCountyFollow @SBCounty on Twitter!