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Heroes Assemble at the San Bernardino County Library

The San Bernardino County Library invites you to strengthen your superpowers and participate in our Summer Reading Program: Heroes Assemble!

Throughout the summer, we will be hosting amazing programs and activities as well as giving away fantastic rewards at all 32 of our branch libraries. Participating is easy: fly in to your local San Bernardino County Library to sign-up and become part of this read for rewards program to earn exciting weekly incentives. Reading for rewards is just the beginning. The Library will be hosting various super hero-themed programs including storytime, crafts, Doc2discovery time as well as awesome performers who provide exciting, entertaining and educational shows the whole family can enjoy. The Summer Reading Program is open to all ages so come on in and sign up the entire family. The best part – this program is absolutely free!

The fun doesn’t stop there. The County Library will offer special drawings for children and teens who meet the County Library Reading Challenge. The children’s challenge is to read at least 45 books or the equivalent in pages and minutes to receive a ticket. For teens, the challenge is to read at least eight books or the equivalent to get a ticket. New this year: each kid and teen who reached the challenge will receive a ticket for a chance to win a Kindle Fire 7” tablet at their branch library. Also, for every 25 items checked out this summer, receive a ticket for our countywide drawing to win one of the grand prizes which include Samsung Galaxy Tablets, a WiiU gaming system, a super hero-themed bike, and a kids Spider-Man Dune Buggy.

Check out the San Bernardino County Library website for details on the kick-off events and program information. Come sign up for the program and be a part of our Summer of Reading Challenge to increase summer reading participation among youth by 15 percent throughout the county.

The San Bernardino County Library System is a dynamic network of 32 branch libraries that serves a diverse population over a vast geographic area. The County library system strives to provide equal access to information, technology, programs, and services for all people who call San Bernardino County home.

The library plays a key role in the achievement of the Countywide Vision by contributing to educational, cultural, and historical development of our County community.

For more information on the San Bernardino County Library system, please visit http://www.sbclib.org/ or call (909) 387-2220.

Board endorses Vision2Read literacy campaign

Vision2Read_Logo_FINALVision2Read, a year-long campaign designed to help improve literacy throughout San Bernardino County by connecting people to literacy programs – whether they need help or are able to help – was endorsed by the Board of Supervisors today as part of its recognition of National Literacy Month.

About 60 percent of San Bernardino County third graders are not proficient in reading, scoring lower than their peers in neighboring Riverside, Los Angeles and Orange counties on the 2013 California Standards Test. Reading at grade level by the third grade is one of the greatest predictors of children’s success in school, their likelihood of going to college, and their future earning potential, according to a 2010 study by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

“Vision2Read is an opportunity for all sectors and members of the San Bernardino County community to engage and take action to support literacy and the success of every child from cradle to career,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman James Ramos. “Literacy has a profound impact on several elements of the Vision we have for our county, including jobs and the economy, public safety, education, and wellness.”

The Vision2Read campaign kicks off with a Saturday, Sept. 19 Family Reading Rally held by the San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools at Cal State University San Bernardino. More than 5,000 children and their families are expected to attend the Reading Rally from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. to participate in interactive workshops, learn about the importance of reading and obtain free books.

Throughout the year, Vision2Read.com will serve as a reading and literacy portal to include literacy facts, resources and services, event information and volunteer opportunities in partnership with the United Ways of San Bernardino County and its 2-1-1 San Bernardino County and HandsOn Inland Empire programs. The web site will go live next week.

All of San Bernardino County is encouraged to get involved in Vision2Read to help raise the bar for literacy in our community and advance our efforts to achieve the Countywide Vision, adopted in June 2011 by the Board of Supervisors and the San Bernardino Associated Governments Board of Directors, which includes the County Board members and a mayor or council member from each of the county’s 24 cities and towns.

Vision2Read helps achieve both regional goals of the Countywide Vision – supporting the success of every child from cradle to career and establishing the county as a model in the state where local government, regulatory agencies and communities are truly business-friendly.

IEEP honors SBCounty red-tape cutters

The Inland Empire Economic Partnership recently recognized the leaders of more than two dozen Inland Empire governments and agencies at its Second Annual “Turning Red Tape to Red Carpet Awards” reception, 14 of them representing San Bernardino County and the Countywide Vision’s Regional Goal of  establishing the county as a model in the state where local government, regulatory agencies and communities are truly business-friendly.

ieeplogoThe IEEP, the region’s largest economic development organization, honored the cities, counties and agencies that came up with innovative ways to enhance job growth and the local economy despite an often-difficult regulatory environment. These are the San Bernardino County agencies, departments and people that have gone the extra yard to grow the economy.

Business Retention and Expansion

FINALISTS: The San Bernardino Community College District for far exceeding its goals of hiring local people to work on capital improvement projects; City of Redlands for an aggressive downtown improvement project that was accomplished without the use of the city’s general fund.

Sustainable and Green Development

WINNER: City of Rancho Cucamonga for an automation project for numerous city departments that puts vital services online for the first time, dramatically reducing the amount of paper and ink that must be used as well as the need to drive to city offices.

RUNNER UP: San Bernardino Associated Governments, for a regional plan to reduce greenhouse gases in compliance with state laws that brings simplicity and consistency for 21 cities in San Bernardino County.

OTHER FINALIST: San Bernardino Community College District, for alternative energy measures in construction, landscaping and energy consumption, along with other environmental strategies.

Real Estate Redevelopment and Reuse

FINALISTS: City of Ontario, for a downtown office building project the will provide jobs while maintaining the character of the area; City of Rialto, for its repurposing a blighted area and helping create that land into the site of a 718,000-square-foot logistics center.

Public-Private Partnership

RUNNER-UP: San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department, which rallied other agencies to work with the promoters of the San Manuel Pavilion and other venues, achieving the twin goals of smooth operations and public safety.

Response to Globalization

WINNER: San Bernardino County Land Use Services Department, for using GIS technology to develop a computerized system that lets would-be developers, even developers in other countries, to self-search vacant land in the county.

Tales of Two Cities: Stories of Interagency Cooperation

WINNER: City of Rancho Cucamonga Library, for developing a program, in partnership with Riverside, Ontario and others, to establish new training parameters for a next generation of librarians in the Inland Empire.

RUNNER-UP: City of Fontana, for bringing other cities and agencies on board to solve issues relating to Interstate 10 interchange development, which helped Fontana redevelop some blighted areas.

OTHER FINALISTS: San Bernardino and Riverside counties, along with UCR and Los Angeles, for implementing the state’s Innovation Hub economic development project; The cities of Yucaipa and Calimesa, which work together on numerous projects despite being in two different counties.

Leadership in Public Service

RUNNER-UP: Kristen Riegel, the Supervising Hazardous Materials Specialist for the San Bernardino County Fire Prevention District. She has worked hard to ensure that businesses can operate with a minimal amount of government-imposed fees and still not compromise the environment or the safety of workers. Under her guidance, fees have come down for 20 percent of the businesses that are covered.

Launch Initiative moves to improve economy in Inland Empire

ieepThe Inland Empire Economic Partnership is bringing together local business, government agencies, schools, housing advocates, public health and human service experts as part of “Launch Initiative” an effort to improve education and the economy in the Inland Empire.

According to this article in The Sun newspaper, Mike Gallo, IEEP Board member and president and CEO of Kelly Space and Technology in San Bernardino said the program will help provide “stable housing for impoverished families, and connect them with their own life coach, which would be a mentor to provide them with goals, timelines and accountability, and guide them through the process of becoming self-sustaining and successful members of the community.”

The Sun quotes Gallo saying Launch Initiative will start with a pilot program of 100 families and 40 life coaches.

This effort is a good proposal that will address job training for adults who have aged out of the traditional educational system and has the promise of complementing the Countywide Vision’s Cradle to Career goal.

Read more about Launch Initatiative here: http://www.sbsun.com/social-affairs/20141107/inland-empire-economic-partnership-aims-to-make-impact-against-poverty#disqus_thread

 

 

 

You’re invited to the 8th Annual Homeless Summit on Nov. 5

Homeless Summit Electronic Invite PIO revised 10 7 14The San Bernardino County Homeless Partnership invites the public to attend the 8th Annual Homeless Summit held in conjunction with the Interagency Council on Homelessness and the Homeless Provider Network.

Homeless service providers, faith-based organizations, city governments, and other public and private agencies involved in providing services to chronically homeless individuals and families are encouraged to attend.

The event will be held from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Ontario Convention Center, 2000 E. Convention Center Way in Ontario.

This year’s event is entitled “Collaboration is KEY”, and is geared to inspire faith-based and community-based homeless providers and government agencies to become more informed and active in forming practical solutions and policies to end homelessness. The summit will include a variety of targeted workshops including:

  • A new law enforcement approach to homelessness;
  • The role of WIA and EDD Employment programs, as well as the veteran program in helping people become employed;
  • Funding opportunities for homeless service providers;  and
  • Progress on ending veteran homelessness

This year’s Homeless Summit is provided free of charge through the Partnerships continued commitment to provide quality services and salient resources to homeless service providers – our essential partners in our joint effort to end chronic homelessness.

Registration for this event is available through the San Bernardino County Homeless Partnership website at www.sbcounty.gov/sbchp/.

There are four workshops to choose from, so please pick one workshop from each section.  You may also contact Deanna Luttrell from the Office of Homeless Services at (909) 386-8225 or via email at dluttrell@dbh.sbcounty.gov if you need assistance with summit registration.

 

 

 

Learn how to expand your business globally

earthParticipate in an exclusive free training program carefully designed to give business executives strategies, insights, and a ready network of contacts necessary to successfully expand sales globally.

“Successful Exporting in Today’s Global Economy,” will be held from 7:30 a.m. to noon on Thursday, Oct. 9 at the Chaffey College Chino Community Center, 5890 College Park Avenue in Chino. Click here to register.

If you believe exporting could be part of your growth strategy, these courses will provide you with the hands on tools and the latest information necessary to succeed. In addition, through this course, you will become informed about the effective finance and marketing assistance currently available through both state and federal agencies and walk away knowing precisely how to leverage these resources.

Selling American products and services overseas is both profitable and culturally rewarding for all companies that want to prosper in today’s global marketplace.

The Export Trade Assistance Partnership (ETAP) provides export training and assistance to local businesses and entrepreneurs interested in expanding to new markets.

To read more about the event, click here.

Business-friendly best practices established across the county

Businesswoman Assisting CustomersIn May 2012, the SANBAG Board of Directors and the County Board of Supervisors adopted implementation goals for the Countywide Vision. One of the implementation goals was to establish San Bernardino County as a model in the state where local governments, regulatory agencies and communities are truly business friendly.

The Jobs/Economy Element Group that consists of representatives of the business community as well as staff from SANBAG and the County took up this implementation goal. One of the tasks that they identified was to find a way for local governments and businesses to share what already works.

The Business-Friendly Best Practices Inventory is the result.

This Inventory was compiled from a survey sent to every city and the County asking them to identify “Business Friendly” practices and programs.  Also included are some best practices identified by other governmental organizations in reports from the U.S. Conference of Mayors, the Washington State Governor’s Office of Regulatory Assistance, the Massachusetts Association of Regional Planning Agencies, the University of North Carolina School of Government, and the Southern California Association of Governments.

Insights were also gained during a Countywide Vision workshop on best practices in development processing between cities and developers and hosted by SANBAG, the County and the Building Industry Association (BIA).

Read the Best Practices Inventory here: Business-Friendly Best Practices Inventory.

Read the Building Industry Association Baldy View Chapter’s Best Recommended Practices.

Transforming communities through collective impact discussed at City-County Conference

partners in progressCity, county and local government leaders convened in at the 14th Annual City-County Conference in Lake Arrowhead on March 24-25 to discuss unique ways to collaborate and bring innovative ideas to meet challenges in our communities.

The conference themed “Partners in Progress” began with a presentation on the benefits of collective impact in solving society’s complex problems.

Collective impact occurs when organizations from different sectors agree to solve a specific social problem using a common agenda, aligning their efforts, and using common measures of success, said Jennifer Splansky Juster, director of the Collective Impact Forum at FSG, a nonprofit consulting firm.

Juster highlighted the use of collective impact used in by officials in New York state who were struggling with recidivism of  their juvenile offenders. By tapping state resources in the areas such as mental health, housing, and corrections, the state reduced the number of juveniles in state custody by 45 percent.

This model has been used across the country to tackle some of the most serious social issues, including the education system in Cincinnati, malnutrition in low socioeconomic status communities, substance abuse in teens, and childhood obesity.  This model holds promise as a successful approach to the Cradle to Career goal of the Countywide Vision.

healthymuralSan Bernardino County Director of Public Health Trudy Raymundo led a lively discussion about healthy communities using artists who drew a mural showing what healthy communities look like based on a wish list received from conference attendees.

Their answers ranged from clean air, to a general plan that promotes diversity in housing amenities, to bike and walking paths and recreation centers.

Barbara Alejandre, assistant to the County Superintendent of Schools joined San Bernardino County Director of Preschool Services Diana Alexander to talk about education’s role in the economy of our region.

Education is an excellent investment in a region’s overall economic vitality, and improves social, environmental, and cultural factors as well. The Countywide Vision Cradle to Career Roadmap was developed to bring all sectors of our community together to support every child’s path to the workforce.

Already underway in the Colton Joint Unified School District are Community Cabinets of educators, parents, community members and business leaders working together to develop concrete goals -such as reading by third grade – to help children excel in school and build the skills necessary to sustain themselves into adulthood.

Board of Supervisors Chair Janice Rutherford and the County’s Chief Executive Officer Gregory C. Devereaux discussed County government’s roles and responsibilities and how those duties relate to a county’s incorporated cities.

devereauxcitycountyCounties have four basic functions: provide municipal services in unincorporated areas, provide the backbone infrastructure, provide health and human services and law enforcement and justice.

Cities and counties have major differences in function and they are not the same in structure and legal abilities, Devereaux said. However, cities and counties can find ways to collaborate and work with each other on major issues to reach common goals.

The conference was sponsored by the County of San Bernardino, San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG) and the South Coast Air Quality Management District.

 

Business-friendly workshop showcases innovative efforts

DevereauxBIAvisionToday, cities, local governments and members of the Building Industry Association Baldy View Chapter discussed the development of business-friendly best practices to help sustain an environment of economic prosperity in our region.

This draft Business-Friendly Best Practices Inventory has been compiled as one way to help achieve the goal.  While “business friendly” may mean slightly different things to different people, one common understanding is that of fostering a welcome environment for businesses to be created, grow and thrive.  This report is a list of programs and practices that were submitted by cities and the County in response to a Best Practices Survey sent to each of SANBAG’s 25 member agencies in April 2013.  Also included are some best practices identified by other governmental organizations in reports from the US Conference of Mayors, the Washington State Governor’s Office of Regulatory Assistance, the Massachusetts Association of Regional Planning Agencies, the University of North Carolina School of Government, and the Southern California Association of Governments.

If you have a business-friendly idea, the Countywide Vision project is interested in hearing from you. Please send your comments and ideas by April 2, 2014 to visionproject@sbcounty.gov.

 

 

Transforming lives through the power of work

gwjessicaWhen you drive by a local Goodwill you might see racks of clothes, shoppers darting to-and-fro to find a hip outfit at a great price, or a neighbor making an in-kind donation. What you may not see are the Goodwill employees and the unique role they play in the community that’s worth far more than anything you can buy in a store.

Jessica Rodriguez is one of those special Goodwill employees that you just won’t see at the local retail store. She works behind the scenes as program manager at Goodwill’s San Bernardino Career Resource Center (located at 444 S. Waterman Ave.) and also manages multiple workforce and career development programs that are dedicated to helping individuals with disabilities and other vocational barriers prepare for and find stable employment.

With that much responsibility, you’d think work motivation would come at a premium; but if you ask Rodriguez, she’ll say it’s easy. All she has to do is step out of her office.

“If I look onto the work floor, looking at the participants doing their job, hearing their stories, looking at their successes, that’s why I continue to come every day to work. Why I motivate and inspire my staff to do the best that they can, it’s those successes,” said Rodriguez.

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