16 Search Results Found For: "volunteer"

Page Title: Copy of – Internship and Volunteer Program

Page Content:

Interns and volunteers at the Department of Public Health (DPH) will find many different opportunities to serve local communities and to learn about the diverse array of programs and services that we offer. Interns and volunteers support the department as nurses, epidemiologists, health educators, research assistants, and several other important roles. If you are interested in exploring a rewarding career in public health or simply want to serve on a temporary basis, there is a place for you at DPH.

What would I be doing as an intern or volunteer?

DPH currently has 13 programs which welcome interns and volunteers. These programs work to address the public’s health from various angles and interventions to positively impact our diverse communities. Interns and volunteers can help in many areas such as research, data analysis or direct customer service such as leading health education and promotion activities.

How does DPH benefit from interns and volunteers?

Interns and volunteers may be very knowledgeable in certain fields of study which will help DPH to achieve its mission and vision. Interns and volunteers also bring a diversity of new perspectives, fresh ideas and creative solutions to health problems within our community and for improving departmental operations.

Which programs use interns or volunteers?

The following DPH programs work with interns and/or volunteers:

•  Animal Care and Control

•  Communicable Disease Section

•  Clinic Operations

•  Community Vital Signs

•  Environmental Health Services

•  Health Promotion & Education Services

•  Healthy Communities

•  Laboratory

•  Nutrition

•  Local Oral Health

•  Preparedness and Response Program

•  Reentry

•  Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)

 

Does DPH offer paid Internships?

DPH does not offer any paid internship or volunteer opportunities at this time. You will, however, receive hands-on experience and receive an opportunity to make an impact on the health and lives of San Bernardino County residents.                                                 

What is required to intern or volunteer?
  • Applicants for internship must be part-time/full-time students, preferably in a Bachelor’s, Master’s, or PhD Program. They must also attend a school that has entered into a current Learner Agreement with DPH (see the Which schools have a Learner Agreement with DPH section below). 
  • Non-internship volunteers must be 18 years of age or older to serve in DPH related activities and events. Volunteers do not need to be in any academic institution to apply.
  • High school students interested in interning with DPH can visit the following website to learn more the county GenerationGo! Program: https://wp.sbcounty.gov/workforce/youth/
What information is needed for my application?

The application contains several of the forms you will need to submit with your application, however you will need to provide information on:

  • Drivers license details
  • Auto insurance details
  • Field advisor contact information, if applicable
  • Emergency Contacts
  • Vocational license information, if any
  • Available schedule for work
How will I know if my application is accepted?

All applications received are downloaded into a database used by a hiring manager to find interns and volunteers that meet a specific DPH program’s needs.

A hiring manager will contact candidates immediately when there is an opening for an intern or volunteer.

Unfortunately, given that we typically receive hundreds of applications each year, we are only able to acknowledge that your application has been received in the form of an email and contact those applicants chosen for an opening.

Which schools have a Learner Agreement with DPH?

• A.T. Still University

• Andrews University

• Argosy University

• Azusa Pacific University

• Benedictine University

• California Baptist University

• California State Polytechnic University

• California State University, Dominguez Hills

• California State University, Fullerton

• California State University, Long Beach

• California State University, Northridge

• California State University, San Bernardino

• Cerritos College

• Chaffey College

• Claremont Graduate University

• Concorde Career Institute

• Everest College

• Frontier Nursing University

• George Washington University

• Grand Canyon University

• Holy Names University

• Loma Linda University

• Mission Career College

• Mt. St Mary’s University

• National University

• Pacific Union College

• Partners for Better Health

• Patton State Hospital

• Reach Out West End

• San Diego State University

• San Joaquin Community College

• Simmons College

• Sonoma State University

• Southeast California College

• Stanbridge College

• Summit Career College

• University of San Francisco

• University of Southern California

• University of St Augustine for Health Services

• University of Tennessee

• Utah State University

• Walden University, LLC

• West Coast Ultrasound Institute

• Western Governors University

• Western University of Health Sciences

Find additional resources and information in the buttons below.

If you have questions or comments about the Internship and Volunteer Program, please contact the DPH Workforce Development Coordinator.

.

Page Link: https://wp.sbcounty.gov/dph/copy-of-internship-and-volunteer-program/


Page Title: Applying for Internship and Volunteer Opportunities

Page Content:

    Ensure you are ready to provide the following:

  • Available work schedule

  • Emergency contact information

  • Field advisor contact information, if applicable

  • Resume and references, if applicable

  • Vocational license information, if any

When you are ready,

APPLY NOW

Page Link: https://wp.sbcounty.gov/dph/applying-for-internship-and-volunteer-opportunities/


Page Title: Internship and Volunteer Program

Page Content:

Interns and volunteers at the Department of Public Health (DPH) will find many different opportunities to serve local communities and to learn about the diverse array of programs and services that we offer. Interns and volunteers support the department as nurses, epidemiologists, health educators, research assistants, and several other important roles. If you are interested in exploring a rewarding career in public health or simply want to serve on a temporary basis, there is a place for you at DPH.

What would I be doing as an intern or volunteer?

DPH currently has 13 programs which welcome interns and volunteers. These programs work to address the public’s health from various angles and interventions to positively impact our diverse communities. Interns and volunteers can help in many areas such as research, data analysis or direct customer service such as leading health education and promotion activities.

How does DPH benefit from interns and volunteers?

Interns and volunteers may be very knowledgeable in certain fields of study which will help DPH to achieve its mission and vision. Interns and volunteers also bring a diversity of new perspectives, fresh ideas and creative solutions to health problems within our community and for improving departmental operations.

Which programs use interns or volunteers?

The following DPH programs work with interns and/or volunteers:

•  Animal Care and Control

•  Communicable Disease Section

•  Clinic Operations

•  Community Vital Signs

•  Environmental Health Services

•  Health Promotion & Education Services

•  Healthy Communities

•  Laboratory

•  Nutrition

•  Local Oral Health

•  Preparedness and Response Program

•  Reentry

•  Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)

 

Does DPH offer paid Internships?

DPH does not offer any paid internship or volunteer opportunities at this time. You will, however, receive hands-on experience and receive an opportunity to make an impact on the health and lives of San Bernardino County residents.                                                 

What is required to intern or volunteer?
  • Applicants for internship must be part-time/full-time students, preferably in a Bachelor’s, Master’s, or PhD Program. They must also attend a school that has entered into a current Learner Agreement with DPH (see the Which schools have a Learner Agreement with DPH section below). 
  • Non-internship volunteers must be 18 years of age or older to serve in DPH related activities and events. Volunteers do not need to be in any academic institution to apply.
  • High school students interested in interning with DPH can visit the following website to learn more the county GenerationGo! Program: https://wp.sbcounty.gov/workforce/youth/
What information is needed for my application?

The application contains several of the forms you will need to submit with your application, however you will need to provide information on:

  • Drivers license details
  • Auto insurance details
  • Field advisor contact information, if applicable
  • Emergency Contacts
  • Vocational license information, if any
  • Available schedule for work
How will I know if my application is accepted?

All applications received are downloaded into a database used by a hiring manager to find interns and volunteers that meet a specific DPH program’s needs.

A hiring manager will contact candidates immediately when there is an opening for an intern or volunteer.

Unfortunately, given that we typically receive hundreds of applications each year, we are only able to acknowledge that your application has been received in the form of an email and contact those applicants chosen for an opening.

Which schools have a Learner Agreement with DPH?

• A.T. Still University

• Andrews University

• Argosy University

• Azusa Pacific University

• Benedictine University

• California Baptist University

• California State Polytechnic University

• California State University, Dominguez Hills

• California State University, Fullerton

• California State University, Long Beach

• California State University, Northridge

• California State University, San Bernardino

• Cerritos College

• Chaffey College

• Claremont Graduate University

• Concorde Career Institute

• Everest College

• Frontier Nursing University

• George Washington University

• Grand Canyon University

• Holy Names University

• Loma Linda University

• Mission Career College

• Mt. St Mary’s University

• National University

• Pacific Union College

• Partners for Better Health

• Patton State Hospital

• Reach Out West End

• San Diego State University

• San Joaquin Community College

• Simmons College

• Sonoma State University

• Southeast California College

• Stanbridge College

• Summit Career College

• University of San Francisco

• University of Southern California

• University of St Augustine for Health Services

• University of Tennessee

• Utah State University

• Walden University, LLC

• West Coast Ultrasound Institute

• Western Governors University

• Western University of Health Sciences

Find additional resources and information in the buttons below.

If you have questions or comments about the Internship and Volunteer Program, please contact the DPH Workforce Development Coordinator.

.

Page Link: https://wp.sbcounty.gov/dph/internship-and-volunteer-program-2/


Page Title: Volunteer Services Program (VSP)

Page Content:

The Volunteer Services Program (VSP) provides short and long-term placement for student interns and volunteers in the Department of Public Health (DPH). VSP offers participants hands-on Public Health experience, skills and knowledge, and networking opportunities that may enable a transition to the career field.

All volunteers and student interns must be a student from a school/institution with a current approved Learner Agreement with the Department of Public Health and complete the following:

  • Registration Packet
  • Background Check
  • Program Interview and Acceptance

Internship and volunteer placements depend on program need and availability. Opportunities are offered in the following programs:

  • Animal Care and Control
  • California Children’s Services (Physical Therapy)
  • Clinic Operations
  • Communicable Disease (Epidemiology)
  • Preparedness and Response
  • Health Education
  • Laboratory
  • Nutrition

 

For more information, please contact:

San Bernardino County Department of Public Health
Volunteer Services Program
340 N. Mountain View Avenue
San Bernardino, CA 92415-0010
(800) 782-4264

volunteers

Page Link: https://wp.sbcounty.gov/dph/programs/health-edu/volunteer-services/


Page Title: Volunteer

Page Content:

Volunteers assist Animal Care and Control at our special adoption events. They assist with set up, transporting animals, answering questions, and introducing animals with potential adopters. If you would like to volunteer with San Bernardino County Animal Care and Control, please call (800) 472-5609. Volunteers must be 18 or older and pass a background check.

 

volunteers

Page Link: https://wp.sbcounty.gov/dph/programs/acc/customer-info/volunteer/


Page Title: Coronavirus 2019

Page Content:

The San Bernardino County Department of Public Health (DPH) continues to work with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) to respond to reports of Novel Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) as the situation is quickly evolving.

Residents of San Bernardino County are encouraged to stay home as much as possible while only participating in essential activities, such as critical work functions and shopping for necessities. We know these measures are challenging, but social distancing will help to protect all of our communities. We encourage older adults and those with chronic medical conditions to take additional precautions to avoid getting sick with the disease.

The County Acting Health Officer has ordered the cancellation of all gatherings based on CDPH’s Gathering Guidance and provided other guidance to the public in an effort to protect our population from any possible spread of the virus. Please stay home if ill, regularly wash hands with soap and water, clean frequently touched surfaces and objects daily and practice social distancing. To prevent stigma and discrimination, it is important to remember that the risk of COVID-19 is not related to race, ethnicity or culture. Do not make determinations of risk based on race or country of origin and be sure to maintain confidentiality of people with confirmed COVID-19.

All San Bernardino County residents and visitors are strongly encouraged to continue to practice good public health hygiene and follow guidance from CDC, CDPH and DPH to protect themselves from possibly spreading any illness. 

For the most updated information about COVID-19, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

COVID-19 SURVEILLANCE DASHBOARD

Screenshot of San Bernardino County Surveillance Dashboard

DESKTOP VIEW (PDF)
Recommended web browsers: Chrome, Firefox, Safari

MOBILE VIEW
Press the small circle with four arrows on the top right corner of your device screen for an expanded view

977

COVID-19 CASES IN
SAN BERNARDINO
COUNTY

31

COVID-19 ASSOCIATED DEATHS IN
SAN BERNARDINO
COUNTY

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COVID-19 HOTLINE

General Information and Resources for San Bernardino County Residents

(909) 387-3911

Monday through Friday
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The hotline is NOT for medical calls. If you are feeling sick, please contact your health care provider. Call 9-1-1 ONLY if you have a medical emergency. If you have questions about social services, please call 2-1-1.

News Releases and Health Officer Orders

COVID-19 crisis endures, but County plans for recovery (Apr. 13, 2020)

Homeless sheltering effort to protect all county residents gets underway (Apr. 13, 2020)

Specimen collection for COVID-19 testing to be held in Montclair (Apr. 10, 2020)

County, partners provide more locations for drive-up COVID-19 testing (Apr. 10, 2020)

San Bernardino County mountains closed to snow play (Apr. 9, 2020)

Clarification of religious services and face-coverings order (Apr. 8, 2020)

Public Health officer orders face covering, electronic-only religious services (Apr. 7, 2020)

HEALTH OFFICER ORDER – Stay-At-Home Order to include Face Coverings for Essential Outings (Apr. 7, 2020)

County creates Nursing Facilities Task Force; issues order mandating patient safety measures (Apr. 6, 2020)

HEALTH OFFICER ORDER – For the Control of COVID-19 Requirements for all Individuals Entering Certain Licensed Facilities and Other Agencies Who are Not a Patient, Existing Resident, or New Resident; Temperature Screening and Self-Evaluation for COVID-19 Symptoms, Masking of All Staff While in Facility, Avoiding Staff Working in Multiple Facilities (Attachment A and B) (Apr. 6, 2020)

Public Health officer recommends face coverings during essential outings (Apr. 2, 2020)

Health Officer formally prohibits short-term rentals (Apr. 2, 2020)

HEALTH OFFICER ORDER – Extension of March 17th Order and Clarification on the Order Related to Lodging Facilities (Apr. 2, 2020)

County offices and attractions will remain closed to public traffic (Apr. 2, 2020)

Twelve reported COVID-19 cases at California Institution for Men, Chino (Apr. 1, 2020)

Traffic requirements for tomorrow’s COVID-19 testing in Victorville (Apr. 1, 2020)

Sample collection for COVID-19 testing to be held in Victorville (Mar. 31, 2020)

County COVID-19 dashboard now includes confirmed cases by city (Mar. 30, 2020)

COVID-19 outbreak in Yucaipa nursing facility (Mar. 28, 2020)

Public Health to hold drive-thru testing; COVID-19 dashboard coming soon (Mar. 25, 2020)

Second death associated with COVID-19 recorded within county (Mar. 25, 2020)

San Bernardino County COVID-19 Press Conference (VIDEO) (Mar. 25, 2020)

First death associated with COVID-19 recorded within county (Mar. 24, 2020)

31 cases of novel coronavirus recorded within county (Mar. 24, 2020)

Short-term rentals advised to comply with health orders (Mar. 23, 2020)

Eight new cases of novel coronavirus recorded within county (Mar. 22, 2020)

Social distancing options created for Supervisors meetings (Mar. 21, 2020)

Four new cases of novel coronavirus recorded within county (Mar. 20, 2020)

County clarifies March 17 Public Health Order (Mar. 19, 2020)

County closes additional offices to public traffic (Spanish) (Mandarin) (Mar. 19, 2020)

Two new cases of novel coronavirus recorded within county (Mar. 18, 2020)

County orders cancellation of all gatherings; Third case confirmed (Mar. 17, 2020)

HEALTH OFFICER ORDER – Cancelling All Gatherings | Orden Del Oficial De Salud Del Condado De San Bernardino Cancelando Todas Las Reuniones (Mar. 17, 2020)

Second case of novel coronavirus recorded within county (Mar. 16, 2020)

County closes several public attractions and public offices (Mar. 16, 2020)

First case of novel coronavirus recorded within county (Mar. 15, 2020)

Health Officer orders cancellation of large gatherings; no local cases in County (Mar. 13, 2020)

County orders cancellation of large gatherings (Mar. 12, 2020)

County declares local health emergency; Still no cases in the county (Mar. 11, 2020)

HEALTH OFFICER ORDER – Mandated COVID-19 Reporting (Mar. 10, 2020)

County continues to monitor COVID-19; reports no local cases (Mar. 9, 2020)

Governor declares State of Emergency; County reports no local cases (Mar. 5, 2020)

County continues to monitor COVID-19; reports no local cases (Mar. 2, 2020)

County continues to monitor COVID-19; reports no local cases (Feb. 28, 2020)

County continues to monitor novel coronavirus; reports no local cases (Feb. 5, 2020)

County monitoring Novel Coronavirus; reports no local cases (Jan. 31, 2020)

County monitoring Novel Coronavirus; reports no local cases (Jan. 28, 2020)

Community Drive-Through Events

In efforts to provide more testing opportunities for San Bernardino County residents, community drive-through sample collection events are being held throughout the county. Samples are collected by public health professionals by inserting a nasal swab up the nostril. These samples are then sent to a laboratory for COVID-19 testing. All persons must meet criteria to be tested. Events are free of charge and do not require health insurance.

Community drive-through sample collection events are currently being planned for Twentynine Palms, San Bernardino and Victorville. Additional events and event details will be announced as they are confirmed.

Please remember, if you are showing symptoms of COVID-19, you can still call your doctor and they can determine if you need testing. 

Upcoming Community Drive-Through Sample Collection Events

Montclair – Montclair Place
5060 E. Montclair Plaza Lane, Montclair (south parking lot off Monte Vista Avenue)
Tuesday, April 14
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Appointment only. Appointment slots are no longer available for this event.

Big Bear Lake – Fox Farm Lot
41850 Garstin Dr., Big Bear Lake
Friday, April 17
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Appointment only. Details will be announced.

Joshua Tree – Copper Mountain College
6162 Rotary Way, Joshua Tree
Wednesday, April 22
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Appointment only. Details will be announced.

Rancho Cucamonga – Rancho Cucamonga Quakes Stadium (LoanMart Field)
8408 Rochester Ave., Rancho Cucamonga
April 27
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Appointment only. Details will be announced.

Guidance for Cities

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Guidance for Homes and Residential Communities

Preventing COVID-19 Spread in Communities
Information on how to prepare and take action at home, childcare and K-12 schools, colleges and universities, work, healthcare settings, large community events/mass gatherings and for first responders 

Information for Specific Groups
Information for Businesses, Schools, Pregnant Women and Children, and Travelers

Public Health Media Library
Free credible health content for your websites, apps and social media

Coronavirus Self-Checker

Recommendation Regarding the Use of Cloth Face Coverings, Especially in Areas of Significant Community-Based Transmission

Interim Guidance for Implementing Safety Practices for Critical Infrastructure Workers Who May Have Had Exposure to a Person with Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19 (PDF Flyer)

CDC/CISA Essential Critical Workers / Employers Do’s and Don’ts Flyer

California Department of Public Health

Guidance for Gatherings

Stay Home except for Essential Needs

Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers

Guidance for Food and Beverage Venues

Guidance for Entertainment Venues
Guidance regarding gambling venues, theme parks and theaters

COVID-19 Cleaning & Waste Management for Residences

Guidance for Individuals with Access and Functional Needs

Guidance documents for home cleaning with COVID-19 positive individuals
Guidance for people with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 who are able to receive care at home, and to their household members and/or caregivers, regarding the cleaning of residences and disposal of waste

Self-Isolation for Older Adults and Those Who Have Elevated Risk

San Bernardino County Department of Public Health

Low Cost Clinics and Federally Qualified Health Centers

DPH Home Isolation Instructions for COVID-19

Office of the Governor

California Volunteers
Information and resources on how to safely donate, volunteer and/or help your local community

Guidance for Healthcare Providers

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Information for Healthcare Professionals
Variety of information for Healthcare Professionals including information about Persons Under Investigation (PUI), Clinical Care, Infection Control, Supply of Personal Protective Equipment, Home Care and much more

Resources for Hospitals and Healthcare Professionals Preparing for Patients with Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19
CDC has developed two checklists that identify key actions that can be taken now to enhance preparedness for potential or confirmed patients with COVID-19.

Interim U.S. Guidance for Risk Assessment and Public Health Management of Healthcare Personnel with Potential Exposure in a Healthcare Setting to Patients with COVID-19

Healthcare Professionals: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

California Department of Public Health

Guidance documents for health care facilities, including long-term care facilities

Prioritization of Patients for Laboratory Testing for COVID-19

Testing Guidance for Health Care Providers and Laboratories 

Use of Personal Protective Equipment during COVID-19 Outbreak

COVID-19 Guidance for Dentistry

Infection Control Recommendations for Facilities with Suspect COVID-19 Patients

Outpatient Healthcare Facility Infection Control Recommendations for Suspect COVID-19 Patients

Guidance for Procedures and Transfer of Deceased Persons with Confirmed or Suspected COVID-19

San Bernardino County Department of Public Health

COVID-19 Communicable Disease Referral Form

COVID-19 Recommendations for Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNF)

COVID-19 Infection Prevention and Control Toolkit for Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNF)

COVID-19 Skilled Nursing Facilities/Long-Term Care Facilities Visitor Questionnaire

Key Points for Healthcare Providers on COVID-19 Testing

DPH Guidance for Clinicians: Evaluating Patients Who May Have COVID-19

DPH Testing Guidance for Health Care Providers and Laboratories

Home Care Instructions for Patients with Mild Respiratory Infection (Español)

COVID-19 Specimen Intake Form

DPH Home Isolation Instructions for COVID-19 (Español)

Low Cost Clinics and Federally Qualified Health Centers

SBC Interfacility Transfer Rules

State of California Department of Social Services

Guidance documents for community care facilities, including assisted living facilities and child care

State of California Labor and Workforce Development Agency

Guidance documents for health care workers and workers in general industry

State of California Department of Industrial Relations

Cal/OSHA Interim Guidance on Coronavirus for Health Care Facilities: Efficient Use of Respirator Supplies

California Cyber Security Integration Center (Cal-CSIC)

Cyber Security Tips, Guidance, and Advisories for Scams and Data Theft related to COVID-19 for Medical Professionals

Guidance for First Responders and Law Enforcement
Guidance for Laboratories
Guidance for Employers/Businesses

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Resources for Business and Employers

Interim Guidance for Businesses and Employers to Plan and Respond to COVID-19

Cleaning and Disinfection Recommendations

Coronavirus Self-Checker

Recommendation Regarding the Use of Cloth Face Coverings, Especially in Areas of Significant Community-Based Transmission

Interim Guidance for Implementing Safety Practices for Critical Infrastructure Workers Who May Have Had Exposure to a Person with Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19 (PDF Flyer)

CDC/CISA Essential Critical Workers / Employers Do’s and Don’ts Flyer

California Department of Public Health

Face Coverings Guidance

Guidance for Gatherings

CDPH Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers

Guidance for Food and Beverage Venues
Guidance regarding restaurants, bars, wineries, food trucks, grocery stores and farmers’ markets

Guidance for Entertainment Venues
Guidance regarding gambling venues, theme parks and theaters

Guidance for Individuals with Access and Functional Needs

San Bernardino County 

Economic Development Agency
San Bernardino County business resources information

DPH Home Isolation Instructions for COVID-19 (Español)

DPH COVID-19 – What to do if you are Sick

DPH COVID-19 – Disinfection Instructions

State of California Labor and Workforce Development Agency

Resources for Employers and Workers

U.S. Small Business Administration 

Disaster Loan Assistance
Federal disaster loans for businesses, private nonprofits, homeowners and renters

Office of the Governor

California Volunteers
Information and resources on how to safely donate, volunteer and/or help your local community

Guidance for Communities

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Coronavirus Self-Checker

Recommendation Regarding the Use of Cloth Face Coverings, Especially in Areas of Significant Community-Based Transmission

Protect Yourself and Your Family

Preventing COVID-19 Spread in Communities

Resources for Large Community Events and Mass Gatherings
Includes Interim Guidance and Cleaning and Disinfection Recommendations

Resources for Community- and Faith- Based Leaders
Includes Interim Guidance, Cleaning and Disinfection Recommendations and Preparation Checklist

California Department of Public Health

Face Coverings Guidance

Guidance for Gatherings

CDPH Stay Home except for Essential Needs

CDPH Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers

Guidance documents for home cleaning with COVID-19 positive individuals
Guidance for people with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 who are able to receive care at home, and to their household members and/or caregivers, regarding the cleaning of residences and disposal of waste

Self-Isolation for Older Adults and Those Who Have Elevated Risk

COVID-19 Cleaning & Waste Management for Residences

Community care facilities, including assisted living facilities and child care

Information for WIC Families 

Information for Women and Families

Immigrant Communities

Guidance for Individuals with Access and Functional Needs

COVID-19 Information for those living with HIV

San Bernardino County Department of Public Health

Home Isolation Instructions for COVID-19 (Español)

Home Care Instructions for Patients with Mild Respiratory Infection (Español)

COVID-19 – What to do if you are Sick

COVID-19 – Disinfection Instructions

Low Cost Clinics and Federally Qualified Health Centers

Office of the Governor

California Volunteers
Information and resources on how to safely donate, volunteer and/or help your local community

Guidance for Schools

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Resources for K-12 Schools and Childcare Programs

Interim Guidance for Administrators of US Childcare Programs and K-12 Schools

Resources for Institutes of Higher Education

Interim Guidance for Administrators of US Institutions of Higher Education (IHE)

Guidance for Student Foreign Travel for Institutions of Higher Education

Cleaning and Disinfection Recommendations

Hygiene Etiquette & Practice – Coughing & Sneezing

Handwashing Health Promotion Materials
A variety of educational resources about keeping hands clean and preventing illnesses

California Department of Public Health

New COVID-19 Guidance for K-12 Schools: Distance Learning, School Meals, Child Care and Student Supervision

Guidance for Child Care and Preschool Settings

Guidance for Schools and School Districts

Guidance for Higher Education (Colleges and Universities)

Guidance documents for home cleaning with COVID-19 positive individuals
Guidance for people with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 who are able to receive care at home, and to their household members and/or caregivers, regarding the cleaning of residences and disposal of waste

Directrices para las escuelas sobre el nuevo coronavirus o COVID-19

Directrices para las instituciones de educación superior sobre el nuevo coronavirus o COVID-19

San Bernardino County Department of Public Health

DPH Home Isolation Instructions for COVID-19 (Español)

Home Care Instructions for Patients with Mild Respiratory Infection (Español)

COVID-19 – What to do if you are Sick

COVID-19 – Disinfection Instructions

San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools

SBCSS COVID-19 Information
For updated information on school closures and additional information for schools in San Bernardino County

California Department of Education

Distance Learning

School Meals

Child Care and Student Supervision

Association of California School Administrators

Coronavirus Resources for Schools
Contains resources from public health agencies relevant to California schools

US Homeland Security Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA)

Guidance on Essential Critical Infrastructure Workforce

Office of the Governor

California Volunteers
Information and resources on how to safely donate, volunteer and/or help your local community

Educational Materials

CDC COVID-19 Handouts and Posters

CDC Public Health Media Library
Free credible health content for your websites, apps and social media

CDPH COVID-19 Graphics (English) (Español)

Hygiene Etiquette & Practice – Coughing & Sneezing

Handwashing Health Promotion Materials
A variety of educational resources about keeping hands clean and preventing illnesses

Prepare for Public Health Emergencies (Español)

Resources

COVID-19 Information

Coronavirus (COVID-19) in California

California Department of Public Health (CDPH)

CDPH Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

World Health Organization

COVID-19 in American Sign Language

COVID-19 Data, Maps, Dashboards

COVID-19 Geographic Information System (GIS) Hub

Social Services

Low-Cost Clinics and Federally Qualified Health Centers
List of clinics that provide medical services for the uninsured

Dignity Health Virtual Care Anywhere 
Download the Virtual Care Anywhere app in the Apple App Store or Google Play Store and use coupon code COVID19 (More details)

California Smokers’ Helpline

Free School Meals Sites in San Bernardino County

Employment Development Department
Provides a variety of support services to individuals financially affected by COVID-19 in California

California Volunteers
Information and resources on how to safely donate, volunteer and/or help your local community

Guidance Documents for Health Care Plans for Screening and Testing for COVID-19

Department of Managed Health Care All Plan Letter

California Department of Insurance Bulletin

There are a number of steps you can take to protect your health and those around you:

  • Stay home except for essential needs. Everyone is required to stay home except to get food, care for a relative or friend, get necessary health care, or go to an essential job.
  • If you must leave your home for an essential outing, wear a face covering that covers your nose and mouth and keep at least 6 feet of distance from other people. Surgical and N95 masks are not recommended for the general population and should be used only by healthcare workers.
  • Wash hands with soap and warm water for 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose or mouth, especially with unwashed hands.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • If someone does become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough, they should stay away from other people to avoid spreading illness and contact their healthcare provider if symptoms become severe.
Dr. Erin Gustafson

San Bernardino County Acting Health Officer

Last updated April 14, 2020

Page Link: https://wp.sbcounty.gov/dph/coronavirus/


Page Title: Food Handlers & Managers

Page Content:

Food Handler Training

Food employees working in San Bernardino County are required to obtain a food handler card from San Bernardino County, Environmental Health Services only. Food handler cards from other counties, programs or companies are not an acceptable substitute. Please call or text 1 (800) 442‐2283 for more information about our food handler training.

The training and test is available online 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and costs $22. Only credit, debit and prepaid debit cards are accepted. The training and test is available in English, Spanish, Mandarin, Korean, Vietnamese and American Sign Language (ASL).

Access the online Food Handler Training and Test.

Food Handler Training Frequently Asked Questions

Q: For the best possible viewing experience of the San Bernardino Online Food Handler Training, what system requirements do you recommend?
A: A DSL internet connection of 1mb or higher, or a dial-up connection of 128K or higher. Not sure where you stack up? Test your connection at http://www.speedtest.net.

The StateFoodSafety.com website and San Bernardino Online Food Handler Course are Flash-based. If the website is not functioning for you (e.g. you are unable to see the map on the StateFoodSafety.com homepage) you will need to download the Adobe Flash player. Get it here: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/.

If you are using the Google Chrome browser, an additional Flash download is not required. StateFoodSafety.com recommends using Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Safari, and Internet Explorer browsers. We do not recommend AOL. For the best viewing experience, make sure you are using an updated version of your preferred browser.

Q: What is the benefit of having the course only online?
A: Due to the large geographical area of San Bernardino County, it may have been inconvenient for residents who needed food handler cards to travel to one of our testing facilities. In order to serve our clients more efficiently, an online training and test has now been made available. The training and test is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The online training and test will benefit San Bernardino County residents because of the cost and time that will be saved in not having to drive to a testing facility. Additionally, the training and test can be taken at your own pace and in the comfort of your home.

Q: How long does the training and test take to complete?
A: The training and test take approximately 1.5 to 2 hours to complete.

Q: I don’t have a computer available to me. How can I take the course?
A: You can take the course on any computer that has internet access. Many employers provide computers, and local libraries also have computers available. If those resources are not an option, computers are available at the following San Bernardino County Workforce Development Resource Centers:

Hesperia
15555 Main St. Suite #G-4
Hesperia, CA 92345

Rancho Cucamonga
9650 Ninth St.
Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730

San Bernardino
658 E. Brier Dr. Suite #100
San Bernardino, CA 92408

Q: I took the course online from another county, program or company and have a card. Will you accept it?
A: No, food handler cards from other counties, programs or companies are not accepted. Food service industry employees working in San Bernardino County are required to obtain their food handler card from San Bernardino County Environmental Health Services only.

Q: What is the cost for taking the course and getting my food handler card?
A: The cost to obtain your food handler card is $22. Only credit, debit and prepaid debit cards are accepted.

Q: How many questions will be on the test? What happens if I fail?
A: There are 40 questions on the test and you may not miss more than 8 questions. You will have 2 opportunities to take the test for each $22 fee.

Q: Can I reprint my food handler card?
A: Yes, you can reprint your food handler card by logging in to the training course with the same username and password that you created when you registered to take the course and print your card.

Q: Do I need to give a copy of the food handler certificate to my employer?
A: Yes, your employer must have a copy of your current valid Certified Food Handler card available at their food facility. The large certificate should be given to the food facility as proof of taking the training and passing the test. The smaller wallet-sized certificate can be kept in the employee’s wallet.

Q: How many times can I take the online course?
A: You can take the online course as many times as necessary until you successfully pass the course. When you sign up and pay the $22 fee, you will be eligible to take the test twice. If you fail both times, you will have to pay the $22 fee again and be given 2 more opportunities to pass the course.

Q: If I sign up online but did not take the course, can I get a refund?
A: You may appeal for a refund from StateFoodSafety.com if you have not yet entered the online course or assessment. Please see below for StateFoodSafety.com refund policy:

Refund appeals are evaluated on a case-by-case basis and are issued by an accounting or client services representative. Refunds will not be issued to people who have completed their online assessment and received a certificate. Refunds will not be issued due to user error. Each customer must create their own account with a user log in and password. Refunds will not be issued via cash or check. Refunds may only be issued to the customer account used for the initial transaction.

Q: Will the colleges and other third parties be able to offer your course?
A: No. You must take the training and assessment through SB County’s website where a link is provided for the food handler course.

Q: If I lose my food handler card, where can I get a replacement card?
A: You can log on to the San Bernardino county website food handler link to reprint your food handler card using the username and password you created when you registered to take the course.

Q: What type of identification will I need in order to take the course online?
A: You will obtain the information at the time of taking the online course, but at a minimum the identification required is first and last name, address, date of birth, gender, and name of employer. You will also need a valid email address to take the course.

Q: The test is skipping, isn’t loading or other technical difficulties are occurring. What should I do?
A: Please visit www.StateFoodSafety.com/support for all technical difficulties. You have the option to email questions to support@statefoodsafety.com or complete an online webform www.statefoodsafety.com/support-form. These options are available to the public from 6 AM – 6 PM Pacific Standard Time. You may also call the toll free customer support-line that is available 24 hours a day/7 days a week at 1-801-494-1416.

Q: Do you offer the online course in languages other than English?
A: The course is also offered in Spanish, Mandarin, Korean and Vietnamese.

Q: Can I stop the training or test, save my spot, and continue to take the training or test at a later time?
A: Yes, you are able to stop the training or test, save your spot and continue at a later time and restart from where you left off. If you are not able to pass with an 80% or higher on your first attempt, you are automatically issued a second test attempt. If you are unable to pass the second time, you will need to repurchase and re-watch the course.

Q: Why is food handler training so important?
A: Food safety has been an important issue in the restaurant industry for decades. Foodborne illnesses are still a major problem in the United States. The CDC estimates that each year 9.4 million Americans get sick, more than 55,900 are hospitalized, and a shocking 1,351 people die from foodborne illnesses just from known pathogens.

Although significant advancements have been made over the last 20 years to educate food service handlers about safe food handling practices, there has been no change since 1984 in the top 3 causes of foodborne illness attributed to food service handlers, those being: poor personal hygiene, improper holding temperatures, improper cooling procedures.

Since the majority of foodborne illnesses are attributed to food service handlers, and the top contributing factors are related to handlers behavior, the importance of the training food handlers receive is critical. As more people are expected to eat out more in the future, no time has ever been more important than now to have an effective food safety as a top priority. While many restaurants currently employ various efforts to ensure food safety, the fact of the matter is people are still getting sick on a daily basis and we must continue to be vigilant.

Q: If I fail the test, do I have to retake the test that same day?
A: No, you don’t. You have as many days to retake the test as you need. You have the option to retake the test immediately or at a later date.

Q: Am I able to save my Food handler certificate to my computer or flash drive?
A: Yes, you can save your Food handler certificate. We recommend that you do this so you can print your Food handler certificate again if you need too. Please do not make copies of the original certificate because this may reduce the quality of the certificate.

Q: Will you accept a voucher I received from HSS and/or the Workforce Development Department?
A: Environmental Health Services will no longer accept the old vouchers submitted through HSS and the Workforce Development Department. Both departments can obtain prepaid numbers through: www.sbcfoodworker.com. You may use these prepaid numbers to access the training, take the test and obtain your food handler card.

Q: I have a food handler card before the new online training and test was offered on September 1st, 2011 and lost it. Can I get a duplicate card?
A: We no longer issue duplicate cards from our old database system. If you need a replacement card, you must retake the test by visiting the Food Handler Training link.

Q: If I have the manager’s certification, do I still need the food handler card?
A: No, the manager’s training and certification supersedes the food handlers card.

Food Manager Certification Training

Currently, County of San Bernardino, Environmental Health Services does not offer a Food Manager Certification Training and test.

The following information pertains to Cal Code, California Health and Safety Code, Division 104, Part 7. California Retail Food Code, Chapter 1. General Provisions, Section 113947.1 (a).

Food facilities that prepare, handle or serve nonprepackaged potentially hazardous food, except temporary food facilities, shall have an owner or employee who has successfully passed an approved and accredited food safety certification examination as specified in Sections 113947.2 and 113947.3. There shall be at least one food safety certified owner or employee at each food facility. No certified person at a food facility may serve at any other food facility as the person required to be certified pursuant to this subdivision. The certified owner or employee need not be present at the food facility during all hours of operation.

View a list of ANSI-accredited food manager certification programs.

Food Safety for Sporting Events Training

Volunteers that handle food and/or food contact surfaces at snack bars are encouraged to take the “Youth Sporting Event Food Safety Training” course. Upon successful completion of this course, participants will receive a certificate of completion and will have the opportunity to obtain and print a variety of food safety posters. NOTE: This module will not provide you with a Food Handler Card. Please refer to the Food Handler Training and Test to obtain an official Food Handler Card.

Access the Youth Sporting Events Food Safety Training course.

Organized Camp Food Safety Training

Volunteers and/or staff that handle food and/or food contact surfaces at organized camps for 2 weeks or less are encouraged to take the “Organized Camp Food Safety Training” course. This course is intended to train the public on how to keep food safe and prevent the spread of foodborne illness while using our Organized Campgrounds. Upon successful completion of this course, participants will receive a certificate of completion and will have the opportunity to obtain and print a variety of food safety posters. NOTE: This module will not provide you with a Food Handler Card. Please refer to the Food Handler Training and Test to obtain an official Food Handler Card.

Access the Organized Camps Food Safety Training course.

Food Safety HELP for Persons in Charge Training

Persons in charge of a Food Facility are encouraged to take the “Food Safety HELP for Persons in Charge” course. This training will teach persons in charge how to utilize Active Managerial Control, or how to proactively incorporate food safety practices, in their establishments to prevent the spread of foodborne illness. Upon successful completion of this course, participants will receive a certificate of completion and will have the opportunity to obtain and print a variety of food safety posters. NOTE: This module will not provide you with a Food Handler Card. Please refer to the Food Handler Training and Test to obtain an official Food Handler Card.

Access the Food Safety HELP for Persons in Charge Training course.

Page Link: https://wp.sbcounty.gov/dph/programs/ehs/food-handlers-managers/


Page Title: Helpful Links

Page Content:

Page Link: https://wp.sbcounty.gov/dph/programs/ehs/helpful-links/


Page Title: Housing & Camps

Page Content:

What We Do

  • Inspect apartments, motels/hotels, organized camps, detention facilities, massage clinics, and bed and breakfasts for possible environmental health hazards
  • Respond to complaints
  • Rehabilitation or demolition
  • Work with neighborhood leaders to remove substandard multifamily structures that are hazardous to the community
  • Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program
Housing

Mold

You should be concerned about mold in your home if the mold growth is extensive and/or can’t be controlled by using disinfectants. Exposure to high airborne mold spore levels may lead to certain health problems. Additionally, mold can cause structural damage to various components in your home.
Allergic reactions are the most common health effects associated with mold exposure. Common symptoms of mold exposure may include respiratory problems, nasal and sinus congestion, burning eyes, watery eyes, reddened eyes, blurry vision, coughing, nose and throat irritation, skin irritation, shortness of breath, possible fever, and central nervous system symptoms such as memory problems, mood changes, and constant headaches.

Environmental Health Services does not test or inspect for mold. You can visit the National Safety Council or Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Asthma, Air Quality, and Environmental Justice websites for additional information on the symptoms of mold exposure.

Additional general information on molds can be obtained from the following websites:

American Lung Association: Indoor Pollution: Biological Agents

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Biological Pollutants in Your Home

Indoor Air Quality: Basics for Schools

Organized Camps

Food Safety Courses

Food Handler Training and Test
Organizations that operate at camps longer than 2 weeks must have their food handler staff obtain the San Bernardino County Certified Food Handler card.

Organized Camp Food Safety Training
Volunteers and/or staff that handle food and/or food contact surfaces at organized camps for 2 weeks or less are encouraged to take the “Organized Camp Food Safety Training” course. This course is intended to train the public on how to keep food safe and prevent the spread of foodborne illness while using our Organized Campgrounds. Upon successful completion of this course, participants will receive a certificate of completion and will have the opportunity to obtain and print a variety of food safety posters.

NOTE: This module will not provide you with a Food Handler Card. If operating more than 2 weeks, please refer to the Food Handler Training and Test to obtain an official Food Handler Card.

Access the Organized Camps Food Safety Training course.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Should I be concerned about mold in my home?
A: Yes, if the mold growth is extensive and/or can’t be controlled by using disinfectants. Exposure to high airborne mold spore levels may lead to certain health problems. Additionally, mold can cause structural damage to various components in your home.

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES DOES NOT TEST FOR MOLD. Additional general information on molds can be obtained from the following web sites:

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Biological Pollutants in Your Home
Common Indoor Air Pollutants
Indoor Air Quality: Basics for Schools
American Lung Association: Indoor Pollution: Biological Agents

Q: What are the common symptoms of mold exposure?
A: Allergic reactions are the most common health effects associated with mold exposure. Symptoms may include respiratory problems, nasal and sinus congestion, burning eyes, watery eyes, reddened eyes, blurry vision, coughing, nose and throat irritation, skin irritation, shortness of breath, possible fever, and central nervous system symptoms such as memory problems, mood changes, and constant headaches.

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES DOES NOT TEST FOR MOLD. Additional information on the symptoms of mold exposure can be obtained from the following web sites:

National Safety Council
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Asthma, Air Quality, and Environmental Justice

Q: What is the phone number to someone that can help me with mold?
A: 1-800-438-4318 (Cal EPA)

Q: Can Environmental Health Services test for mold?
A: No, Environmental Health Services does not test or inspect for mold.

Camp Newsletters

Page Link: https://wp.sbcounty.gov/dph/programs/ehs/housing-camps/


Page Title: Food Facilities

Page Content:

What We Do

  • Inspect places where food is eaten, processed, sold or stored (restaurants, markets, food stands, carnivals, etc.) for sanitation and food safety
  • Investigate complaints of suspected foodborne illness, insanitary conditions and other problems
  • Review plans and inspect construction of food facilities
  • Inspect wholesale food manufacturers and distributors for sanitation and food safety
  • Inspect and sample retail ice cream/yogurt/soft-serve machines
Food facility inspection

Food Service Operations

ABC Retail Food Inspection Guide

Helpful Resources and Tips (Food) English and Spanish

Official Inspection Report

Cal Code – California Retail Food Code

Food Facility Self-Inspection Checklist

Food Facility Self-Inspection Checklist Spanish

Food Facility Risk Based Inspection Frequency

Missing Food Handler Card Tracking Sheet
Spreadsheet to track missing food handler cards

Sidewalk Vendors Information Sheet

Schools

Safe Schools Action Guide
Link to strategies that schools can implement to prevent foodborne illness

Commissaries

Approved Commissaries
Approved commissaries that service catering vehicles, ice cream trucks, ice cream pushcarts and hot dog carts.

 

 

 

Community Event & Temporary Food Facilities

Temporary Event Health Permit Is For:

  • Temporary food facility (TFF) vendors
  • TFF event organizers
  • Temporary body art vendors
  • Temporary body art event organizers

Temporary Food Facility (TFF) Event Organizer Requirements

Temporary Food Facility (TFF) Vendor Requirements

Special Event Portable Toilet Recommendations
Chart to calculate the number of portable toilets necessary for an event.

Food Competition Requirements

Mobile Food Facilities

Food Carts – General Requirements Checklist

Food Trucks – General Requirements Checklist

Food Safety HELP for Persons in Charge Training

In addition, persons in charge of a Food Facility are encouraged to take the “Food Safety HELP for Persons in Charge” Course. This training will teach persons in charge how to utilize Active Managerial Control, or how to proactively incorporate food safety practices in their establishments to prevent the spread of foodborne illness. Upon successful completion of this course, participants will receive a certificate of completion and will have the opportunity to obtain and print a variety of food safety posters. NOTE: This module will not provide you with a food worker card. Please refer to the Food Worker Training and Test to obtain an official Food Worker Card.

Charitable Feeding Operations

Did you know that in the United States 40% of food produced goes uneaten? That is 62.5 million tons of wasted food every year. Meanwhile, there were 42.2 million people, including 13.1 million children, who did not have enough food to lead a healthy, active lifestyle in 2015. While reducing hunger in the US will require addressing the root causes of poverty, donations of wholesome, fresh food can be an important strategy to addressing the immediate needs of millions of Americans.

You can help reduce food loss, and feed those in need by donating your surplus food. Donors are protected under the Federal Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act and the California Good Samaritan Food Donation Act (AB 1219).

The benefits of donating surplus food include, but are not limited to: Community investment and support, corporate image, tax incentives, reduced impact on local landfills, the environment, the planet, and strategy to meet state mandates such as AB 1826.

Volunteers and staff who handle food for charitable feeding operations are encouraged to take this Charitable Feeding Operations food safety training module. This free course is intended to train the public on how to keep food safe and prevent the spread of foodborne illness. Training is available in English and Spanish and the course is 22 minutes long. This module will not provide you with a Food Handler Card. Please refer to the Food Handler Training and Test to obtain an official Food Handler Card.  

Youth Sports Snack Bars

Announcements

Beginning January 2015, all youth sports snack bar operations that prepare, sell and/or distribute food to the public will have to be inspected and permitted by DEHS. Per the California Health & Safety (H & S) Code §113713, DEHS is the responsible agency for enforcing all food protection laws of the state within the County of San Bernardino. Operations at snack bars must meet applicable state requirements to ensure food handling practices are performed in a safe manner.

Anticipated Changes for Food Distribution at Youth Sporting Events.

Application for Youth Sporting Event Snack Bar Health Permit

Food Safety Courses

Youth Sporting Events Food Safety Training

To assist with those changes, the County of San Bernardino Environmental Health Services has collaborated with StateFoodSafety.com in making a brief online Food Safety Course for Youth Sporting Event Snack Bars. Volunteers that handle food and/or food contact surfaces at snack bars are strongly encouraged to complete this course. Upon successful completion, participants will receive a certificate of completion and will have the opportunity to obtain and print a variety of food safety posters. NOTE: This module will not provide you with a food worker card. Please refer to the Food Worker Training and Test to obtain an official Food Worker Card.

Community Food Producers

The following information is for Community Food Producers including but not limited to culinary gardens, community gardens, personal gardens, school gardens and egg producers that supply produce/eggs to food operations regulated by DEHS or directly to the public. Community food producers may sell or provide whole, uncut fruits or vegetables or unrefrigerated shell eggs directly to the public, to a permitted restaurant or a Cottage Food Operation if they meet all requirements imposed. Egg production is limited to 15 dozen eggs per month. The purpose of these guidelines is to help minimize microbial food safety hazards for fresh produce. By using Best Management Practices (BMPs) for California Small Farm Food Safety as described by the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA), operators will reduce microbial hazards for the produce that are grown, prepared and sold. The BMP documents can be found in the California Small Farm Food Safety Guidelines. All Community Food Producers are required to complete the Community Food Producer Registration Form below and return it to DEHS.

Food Worker Training and Test/Food Manager Certification

For prepackaged permit, no food handling certifications are required. For limited and/or full food preparation permits with potentially hazardous food, the following applies. Persons that work and/or are employed to handle food at snack bars, and the person in charge of a snack bar, are required to take the Food Worker Training and Test to obtain an official San Bernardino County food worker card within 14 calendar days following the date of employment. Within 60 days of commencement of operation, at least one person must take an approved Food Manager Certification Training and obtain a valid Food Manager Certification. Ideally this would be the person in charge. The Food Manager Certification supersedes the food worker card. Visit our Food Handlers and Managers webpage for more information on the Food Worker Training and Test and Food Manager Certification Training.

Vending Machines

We permit vending machines with potentially hazardous food products such as ice cream, cold sandwiches, and open cup beverages. Help us identify expired permits on vending machines with these products. If you see an expired permit, please call or text us at 1 (800) 442-2283 or submit a complaint online. Please do not notify us about vending machines with prepackaged snacks or canned soda.

Approved Vending Machine Commissaries

Micro Markets

A micro market is a retail food facility that allows customers to purchase prepackaged fresh foods, fruits, health snacks, and beverages via unattended self-checkout kiosks. Micro markets may be located in office buildings or restricted break areas where access by the general public is somewhat restricted. A micro market is serviced on a pre-set schedule to ensure the equipment is cleaned and working properly, and food shelves and refrigerated and/or freezer units are stocked with new products. In order to obtain approval for a micro market, plans must be submitted to the Division of Environmental Health Services (DEHS) Plan Check program for review and approval. After plans are approved, an on-site inspection is conducted to determine if a health permit can be issued.

Micro Markets Plan Review & Operation Information

Nutritional Labeling Requirements

Senate Bill 20 requires that all chain restaurants (with 20 or more establishments nationwide) provide consumers with nutritional information of calorie content for all standard menu items prepared and sold as part of their establishment. Review the Menu Labeling document for more information.

Raw Oyster Warning

The sale of raw oysters harvested from the Gulf of Mexico during April 1 through October 31 is restricted in the State of California unless the oysters are treated with a scientifically validated process to reduce Vibrio vulnificus to non-detectable levels (pasteurized). Raw Gulf oysters received during April through October that have not been processed to reduce C. vulnificus to non-detectable levels (pasteurized) are considered adulterated. Retailers receiving and selling raw Gulf oysters harvested during November through March should post the following warning sign.

Raw Oyster Warning Sign (printable for display in food facilities).

Food Facilities Frequently Asked Questions

Q: How does Environmental Health make restaurants safer?
A: Environmental Health Specialists inspect all food facilities twice a year, looking at how food is handled, stored, and prepared; the personal hygiene and habits of the employees; and the general cleanliness of the facility. The Environmental Health Specialist has access to the entire food facility, but as a consumer, you can also view some of these things from the dining area. If you would like to see an inspection report on a food facility, the food facility operator will provide a copy of the most recent inspection report for review by the public upon request. You can also look in our Restaurant Ratings link to review a facility’s inspection score, grade and any violations they may have had at the time of inspection.

Q: Is it a violation of the law for a food handler to touch food with his/her bare hands?
A: The California Retail Food Code does not prohibit bare hand contact with food as long as the food handler complies with the strict hand washing requirements as required by law and does not engage in any activity which could contaminate food. Environmental Health strongly encourages the use of utensils (scoops, forks, tongs, paper wrappers, gloves, etc.) whenever possible to minimize bare hand contact with ready to eat foods. To obtain more information, please view our hand washing flyers available in English and Spanish.

Q: How do I report a food facility for health code violations?
A: Environmental Health investigates consumer complaints regarding food safety and sanitation at all retail food facilities in San Bernardino County. If you have a consumer complaint regarding a San Bernardino County food facility, please call 909-884-4056 to report the complaint. Please provide the name and address of the facility you want investigated and explain the conditions you are reporting. You may also complete the Online Complaint Form.

Q: I think I got sick from food. How do I file a report?
A: All possible foodborne illnesses that are reported to Environmental Health are investigated. If you believe that you became ill due to a food product purchased in San Bernardino County you may call 909-884-4056 to report the incident. Be prepared to answer questions about the onset time, duration, and types of symptoms. Try to compile a list of all foods and drinks consumed for up to two days prior to the first signs of illness, as this information is critical for the investigation. You may also complete the Online Complaint Form. Some commercially distributed prepackaged foods are regulated by other State and Federal agencies. Environmental Health can assist in making referrals to the correct agency.

Q: My refrigerator door was accidentally left open overnight. Can I still eat the food inside?
A: The answer to this question depends on the temperature of the food and how long it was held without refrigeration. Use a food thermometer to measure the temperature on the inside of the food. If the food is not above 41°F, then it should be safe to eat. If the food has been above 41°F, then it is critical to determine how long it has been above 41°F. If the food has been above 41°F for less than two hours, it should be safe for immediate use. If the food has been above 41°F for more than two hours, then it is safest to discard these items.

Q: What is the required holding temperature for hot/cold food?
A: Minimum hot holding temperatures and maximum cold holding temperatures are only required for potentially hazardous foods. Potentially hazardous foods are foods that are capable of supporting the rapid growth of disease causing microorganisms (e.g. meat, dairy, poultry, fish, and other high moisture/ protein foods). Potentially hazardous foods must be held at or below 41°F or at or above 135°F.

Q: What is the required cooking temperature for hamburger, pork and poultry?
A: Foods that contain ground beef need to be cooked until the internal temperature is 155°F for 15 seconds. Pork must be cooked until the internal temperature is 145°F for 15 seconds. Poultry must be cooked until the internal temperature is 165°F for 15 seconds. Measuring the internal temperature with a metal-stemmed probe thermometer is the only safe way of determining when the product properly cooked.

Q: Can you test my food to see if there is anything wrong with it?
A: Environmental Health does not routinely perform laboratory testing on food products in the possession of the consumer. If testing is conducted, it is usually done as part of an ongoing investigation. The Environmental Health Specialist in charge of the investigation will ask for a product release from the consumer if testing is necessary. If you would like a product tested for your own information, there are a number of private analytical testing laboratories listed in the telephone directory that have the ability to test food. They are listed in the yellow pages under Laboratories.

Q: What do code dates mean on food products?
A: Manufacturers of baby formula are required to date their products. After this date, these products must be removed from sale. However, with all other packaged food products, code dates are voluntary. These dates are a recommended by the manufacture for quality assurance. These products may remain available for sale even though they have gone past their expiration date.

Q: What do I have to do to start a food business out of my home?
A: Food preparation/distribution is not allowed at home without a health permit/registration. If you would like to prepare and sell non-potentially hazardous food from home, you must apply for a Cottage Food Operations registration or health permit with the County of San Bernardino, Division of Environmental Health Services. Before you are able to apply for this registration or health permit, you must have approval from your local city planning department. If you live in a County area, you must obtain approval from the County Land Use Services Department. Although a Cottage Food Operations permit/registration will allow you to prepare and sell food from home, there are restrictions that apply. For more information, please see our Cottage Food Operations page. Please note: Potentially hazardous food cannot be prepared at or distributed from a home.

Q: What do I have to do to open a food facility and obtain a health permit?
A: If you intend to build a food facility from the ground up or remodel an existing building that has never been a food facility you will need to submit plans to our Plan Check Program prior to any construction. Please refer to our Plan Check page for additional information.

Q: I’m thinking of buying an existing food business. What do I need to do?
A: You will need to obtain a Health Permit from Environmental Health Services in your name as permits are not transferable. Contact our office and check to see if the facility will need to go through our Plan Check process.

Q: What is Vibrio vulnificus?
A: Vibrio vulnificus is a bacterium in the same family that causes cholera. These bacteria normally live in warm seawater such as in the Gulf of Mexico and are commonly associated with live or raw oysters that are consumed. Vibrio vulnificus can infect the bloodstream causing a severe and life-threatening illness characterized by fever and chills, decreased blood pressure (septic shock), and blistering skin lesions. Vibrio vulnificus bloodstream infections are 50% fatal.

Q: How do I get a San Bernardino County food handler’s card?
A: Please visit our food handler page for additional information on how to obtain or renew a food handler certificate.

Mobile Food Facilities Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is a Community Event?
A: A “Community Event” is an event of civic, political, public, or educational nature, including state and county fairs, city festivals, circuses, and other public gathering events approved by DEHS.

Q: What is a Mobile Food Facility?
A: A Mobile Food Facility can be classified as a cart or vehicle used for prepackaged potentially hazardous and non-potentially hazardous foods or vehicles where food preparation is observed.

Q: I would like to purchase a Mobile Food Facility. What are the basic requirements?
A: Refer to the Mobile Food Facility- Build It Right or contact DEHS Plan Check at 800-442-2283.

Q: I have an existing food truck. How can I obtain a health permit to operate?
A: The truck must undergo Plan Check Review and meet all DEHS Plan Check requirements. Contact Plan Check at 800-442-2283 for additional information.

Q: I have a food truck approved and permitted in Orange County and Los Angeles County. What do I need in order to operate in San Bernardino County?
A: In order for the vehicle to operate in San Bernardino County, the vehicle must go through a DEHS modified plan review process. Contact Plan Check at 800-442-2283 for additional information.

Q: What is the cost for Plan Review?
A: Please see our current fee schedule, available on our website.

Q: Do I need a business License/peddler’s License?
A: If you plan to operate in unincorporated County areas you will need approval from the County Planning Department. If you plan to operate in an incorporated area, you may need a business license from the local jurisdiction. Call the appropriate city for specific requirements.

Q: Do I need a health permit to operate my food truck?
A: Yes. All food trucks operating in San Bernardino County shall have a valid County of San Bernardino DEHS Health Permit.

Q: What will it cost for an annual health permit?
A: Please see our current fee schedule, available on our website.

Q: What are the requirements to sell food to the public from temporary food facilities?
A: Temporary food operations have specific requirements that are contained in the California Retail Food Code. Temporary food facilities are restricted as to where they may operate. They must operate at a “Community Event” that is pre-approved by DEHS. The community event organizer must give approval to each vendor to operate at that event. After approval by the event organizer, each food vendor must obtain a Health Permit from DEHS at least 48 hours before the event. DEHS has developed a packet that will assist you. Specific requirements can be found in the temporary food facilities section.

Q: Can I store my Mobile Food Facility at home?
A: All mobile food facilities must be serviced at a DEHS-approved commissary.

Q: Can I operate my vehicle at a private event?
A: Check with the local jurisdiction for restrictions.

Q: What type of activities can I perform outside of my vehicle?
A: Barbequing is permitted. However, no food preparation or assembly is allowed outside the vehicle. Contact the local jurisdiction for specific requirements.

Q: How often will the truck be inspected?
A: A Mobile Food Facility with an annual MFF health permit with the County will be inspected three times per year: one “in-office” inspection and two unannounced field inspections conducted annually.

Q: When will I receive a letter grade?
A: A Mobile Food Facility with an annual MFF health permit will be issued a letter grade at the conclusion of each of the two routine field inspections.

Q: Where do I post the letter grade?
A: The letter grade will be posted by a DEHS health inspector in a location that is clearly visible to the general public and shall remain in place until the next routine field inspection.

Q: Does everyone working in the vehicle need to have a Food Worker Certification?
A: All employees handling food shall have their food worker certification available for review upon inspection.

Q: Are Food Safety Certificates (Manager Certifications) required for food preparation vehicles?
A: Yes, at least one person in the vehicle shall have a valid Food Safety Certificate available for review in the vehicle. Only the original version will be permitted.

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Page Link: https://wp.sbcounty.gov/dph/programs/ehs/food-facilities/